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2007 Progress in FE Report

2007 Progress in FE Report

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Published by Fevered Steve
This short report came about because the researchers that carried out the survey for Becta after I had moved on to another role just couldn't do this bit. So I was brought back in to crunch the data so that we could have some continuation from the previous series.

I'm uploading these to Scribd because Becta is due to close soon. I need to get all the things I had a hand in creating somewhere I can find and share them.
This short report came about because the researchers that carried out the survey for Becta after I had moved on to another role just couldn't do this bit. So I was brought back in to crunch the data so that we could have some continuation from the previous series.

I'm uploading these to Scribd because Becta is due to close soon. I need to get all the things I had a hand in creating somewhere I can find and share them.

More info:

Published by: Fevered Steve on Dec 13, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/17/2011

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Progress of e-enablement in FE and sixth-form colleges
May 2008 http://www.becta.org.uk page 1 of 8 © Becta 2008 E-enablement in FE
Becta
 
The progress of e-enablement in FE andsixth-form colleges
 
A briefing on the tracking
of colleges‟ implementation of ICT and e
-learning 2003 - 2007
Steve DaviesMay 2008
 
Becta | 
Progress of e-enablement in FE and sixth-form colleges
 May 2008 http://www.becta.org.uk page 2 of 8 © Becta 2008 E-enablement in FE
The progress of e-enablement in FE and sixth-form colleges
Key messages
The headline level of e-enablement appears unchanged from 2006-7. Some 25% ofcolleges were e-enabled and around half were enthusiastic. However, in ambivalentand late-adopter colleges, the situation may have worsened.
Chart 1
The vast majority of colleges have continued to maintain their strategies for the useof ICT in teaching and learning. These strategies were established in 2000, so theplanning process looks well embedded in the college sector. Management activitydirected towards ICT also appears to have increased in the last two years, indicatingthat this planning is being put into action.Detailed examination shows a change in emphasis away from access towards use.Colleges were making greater use of a range of resources and offering support topractitioners. There was greater use of ICT across college programmes and for awider range of purposes. However, this may have been achieved at the expense ofstudent and staff ability to access the system without problems.The uneven progress of individual colleges over several years illustrates thechallenge faced by colleges trying to maintain or increase activity within theconstraints set by their budgets. However this analysis also shows that it is possiblefor colleges lower down the e-enablement spectrum to make rapid and sustainedprogress.
2003 2004 2005 2006 2007E-enabled6% 8% 11% 25% 25%Enthusiastic43% 50% 51% 50% 48%Ambivalent26% 23% 19% 13% 7%Late adopters25% 19% 19% 12% 19%0%10%20%30%40%50%60%70%80%90%100%
   P   e   r   c   e   n   t   a   g   e   o    f   c   o    l    l   e   g   e   s
Spectrum of e-enablement
 
Becta | 
Progress of e-enablement in FE and sixth-form colleges
 May 2008 http://www.becta.org.uk page 3 of 8 © Becta 2008 E-enablement in FE
The progress of e-enablement in FE and sixth-form colleges
Tracking strategy in action
In summer 2000, the Further Education Funding Council (FEFC) required eachcollege to develop an ILT strategy. The following year colleges were required torevise these strategies. All colleges complied with this. By 2007 82% of collegesstill had a dedicated strategy that addressed at least one aspect of ICT and e-learning (Calvert et al 2008, p27). In most of the others this was addressed as partof a wider strategy..A written strategy, if it is not translated into action, quickly becomes a dead
document. If we are asked to describe an organisation‟s strategy, we look to itsactions, rather than to the document on the Chief Executive‟s desk. Strategy, says
Henry Mintzb
erg, is „a pattern in action over time‟ (Mintzberg, 1987).
To track these strategies in action, we developed measures of e-learningimplementation using survey data collected since 2003. These measured progressacross five broad dimensions. Each of these dimensions was arrived at bycombining four measures derived from the survey data. All the measures weretreated equally. Each dimension produced a score out of 20, and when addedtogether, these dimensions gave an overall score out of 100 for each college. Chart2 shows the median values for each dimension as they changed from 2003 to 2007.
Chart 2
Access Resources Workforce E-learning Management200315.8 10.4 10.7 9.7 11.3200415 11.3 11.4 10.5 11.3200514.2 11.5 11.8 11.1 11.3200615 11.7 11.8 11.5 12.9200713.3 14.3 10 11.9 14.6
024681012141618
   M   e   d   i   a   n   s   c   o   r   e
Measures of e-learning implementation

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