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US Mayors Climate Protection Strategy Handbook 2007

US Mayors Climate Protection Strategy Handbook 2007

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Published by AxXiom
In 2007, the U.S. Conference of Mayors convened a Climate Protection
Summit, and announced as its ―top legislative priority‖ for the 110th Congress a
new Energy and Environmental Block Grant program; the Conference also
published a Climate Protection Strategies and Best Practices Guide31 that detailed
how, with ―cross-cutting‖ or ―comprehensive multi-faceted approaches,‖ ―regional
initiatives,‖ and ―focused initiatives,‖ fifty-two cities conserved energy and
reduced greenhouse gases. By the spring of 2008, more than 800 mayors,
representing towns and cities whose combined populations numbered almost 80
million people, endorsed the Climate Protection Agreement. Further local action
took place through coordinated initiatives within states. For example, in 2007,
residents of 134 towns in New Hampshire approved resolutions supporting local
and national efforts to combat climate change.

Government actors in the United States are not the only ones who have
embraced horizontal coordination at the subnational level. Cities around the world
work together, and many have a particular focus on climate issues. Illustrative of
such national border crossings by subnational units is the International Council for
Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI), a group of more than 815 local
governments begun in 1990 by the International Union of Local Authorities and
the United Nations Environmental Program.

Another example of translocal work is a 2007 initiative through which a coalition of
sixteen of the world‘s largest cities (including Berlin, Chicago, Mumbai, São Paulo, and New York)
agreed to sponsor upgrades to older buildings to cut energy use and reduce greenhouse gas
emissions. A consortium of banks lent five billion dollars, to be repaid as cities save money
through reduced energy use.
In 2007, the U.S. Conference of Mayors convened a Climate Protection
Summit, and announced as its ―top legislative priority‖ for the 110th Congress a
new Energy and Environmental Block Grant program; the Conference also
published a Climate Protection Strategies and Best Practices Guide31 that detailed
how, with ―cross-cutting‖ or ―comprehensive multi-faceted approaches,‖ ―regional
initiatives,‖ and ―focused initiatives,‖ fifty-two cities conserved energy and
reduced greenhouse gases. By the spring of 2008, more than 800 mayors,
representing towns and cities whose combined populations numbered almost 80
million people, endorsed the Climate Protection Agreement. Further local action
took place through coordinated initiatives within states. For example, in 2007,
residents of 134 towns in New Hampshire approved resolutions supporting local
and national efforts to combat climate change.

Government actors in the United States are not the only ones who have
embraced horizontal coordination at the subnational level. Cities around the world
work together, and many have a particular focus on climate issues. Illustrative of
such national border crossings by subnational units is the International Council for
Local Environmental Initiatives (ICLEI), a group of more than 815 local
governments begun in 1990 by the International Union of Local Authorities and
the United Nations Environmental Program.

Another example of translocal work is a 2007 initiative through which a coalition of
sixteen of the world‘s largest cities (including Berlin, Chicago, Mumbai, São Paulo, and New York)
agreed to sponsor upgrades to older buildings to cut energy use and reduce greenhouse gas
emissions. A consortium of banks lent five billion dollars, to be repaid as cities save money
through reduced energy use.

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Categories:Types, Research
Published by: AxXiom on Dec 13, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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11/09/2011

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Mayors Climate Protection CenterNovembe
1-2
, Seattle
Climate ProtectionStrategies andBest Practices Guide
2007
Mayors Climate Protection Summit Edition
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THE UNITED STATES CONFERENCE OF MAYORSTHE CITYOF SEATTLE
 
The United StatesConference of MayorsDouglas H. Palmer 
Mayor of TrentonPresident
Manuel A. Diaz
Mayor of MiamiVice President
Greg Nickels
Mayor of SeattleAdvisory Board Chair Co-Chair, Mayors Climate Protection Task ForceEvent Host
 James Brainard
Mayor of CarmelCo-Chair, Mayors Climate Protection Task Force
Will Wynn
Mayor of AustinChair, Energy Committee
Patrick McCrory 
Mayor of CharlotteChair, Environment Committee
Tom Cochran
Executive Director 
usmayors.org 
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Foreword
This report on U.S. cities’ efforts to conserve energy and reduce the greenhouse gasemissions that threaten our planet has been prepared for the Mayors Climate ProtectionSummit in Seattle. It is based on information submitted to The U.S. Conference of Mayors by mayors who applied for the First Annual Mayors’ Climate Protection Awards,announced in June during our 2007 Annual Conference of Mayors in Los Angeles, and by mayors planning to participate in the Seattle Summit.Two years ago the Conference of Mayors unanimously endorsed the U.S. MayorsClimate Protection Agreement, an initiative launched by Seattle Mayor Greg Nickels inwhich participating cities are committed to 1) striving to meet or beat the Kyoto Protocoltargets in their own communities, through actions ranging from anti-sprawl land-use policies to urban forest restoration projects to public information campaigns; 2) urgingtheir state governments, and the federal government, to enact policies and programs tomeet or beat the greenhouse gas emission reduction target suggested for the United Statesin the Kyoto Protocol – a seven percent reduction from 1990 levels by 2012; and 3)urging the U.S. Congress to pass greenhouse gas reduction legislation which wouldestablish a national emission trading system.Conference President and Trenton Mayor Douglas H. Palmer has encouraged andcontinues to urge mayors to sign on to the Agreement; nearly 700 have done so to date – including the mayors of cities whose initiatives are described in this report – and thenumber continues to rise.For decades our Conference has adopted and promoted policy positions on a range of issues affecting energy production and use and its impact on the environment. In recentyears we have increasingly called attention to the need for global climate protection,focusing on renewable energy sources, national standards for climate change, buildingstandards and practices, and transportation options.Conference President Palmer unveiled a 10-Point Plan in January during our Winter Meeting in Washington which makes enactment of a new Energy and EnvironmentalBlock Grant our top legislative initiative for the 110
th
Congress, and we are making great progress toward this goal. Following this, in February, President Palmer and I officiallylaunched The U.S. Conference of Mayors Climate Protection Center. This action took our organization beyond advocacy; it responded to an urgent need to provide mayors withthe guidance and assistance they need to lead their cities’ efforts to reduce the greenhousegas emissions linked to climate change.One of the first activities undertaken by the Climate Protection Center was a survey of cities designed to build a baseline of information on their efforts to reduce greenhousegas emissions. Released during our Los Angeles meeting, it showed that, in citiesthroughout this nation, fleets include vehicles that use alternative fuels or hybrid-electric

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