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2010-12-14 Iqaluit Consultation Final

2010-12-14 Iqaluit Consultation Final

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Published by: Canadian Internet Registration Authority on Dec 14, 2010
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08/26/2011

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Canadian
 
Internet
 
Forum
 
Iqaluit
 
Consultation
 
Date
:
 
November
 
15,
 
2010
 
Venue
:
 
Nova
 
Inn,
 
Iqaluit
 
What 
 
could/should
 
the
 
future
 
of 
 
the
 
Internet 
 
in
 
Canada
 
be
 
like?
 
Participants
 
in
 
Iqaluit
 
suggested
 
that
 
“faster,
 
affordable,
 
reliable,
 
stable”
 
are
 
attributes
 
that
 
southern
 
Canadians
 
might
 
take
 
for
 
granted
 
when
 
describing
 
the
 
internet
 
but
 
are
 
central
 
characteristics
 
that
 
northerners
 
want
 
for
 
internet
 
access
 
across
 
the
 
North.
 
In
 
their
 
view,
 
a
 
faster,
 
affordable,
 
reliable
 
and
 
stable
 
Internet
 
is
 
essential
 
to
 
preserve
 
both
 
the
 
history
 
and
 
the
 
future
 
of 
 
the
 
far
 
North.
 
Northern
 
Canadians
 
currently
 
pay
 
$120/month
 
(compared
 
to
 
between
 
$60
80
 
in
 
the
 
rest
 
of 
 
the
 
country)
 
for
 
internet
 
access
 
mostly
 
delivered
 
via
 
satellite
 
(VSAT)
 
connections
 
and
 
last
 
mile
 
delivery
 
through
 
poor
 
quality
 
dialup.
 
But
 
how
 
else
 
can
 
northerners
 
be
 
connected
 
to
 
reliable
 
high
 
speed
 
internet
 
enjoyed
 
by
 
much
 
of 
 
the
 
rest
 
of 
 
the
 
country
 
given
 
their
 
remote
 
locations
 
and
 
dispersed
 
populations
 
(with
 
participants
 
suggesting
 
that
 
even
 
in
 
the
 
south,
 
only
 
50%
 
of 
 
the
 
population
 
has
 
broadband
 
access
 
by
 
cable/DSL/fibre
 
with
 
the
 
remainder
 
dependent
 
on
 
satellite).
 
Participants
 
felt
 
this
 
situation
 
presents
 
an
 
opportunity
 
for
 
innovation
 
and
 
economic
 
development
 
but
 
specific
 
actions
 
are
 
needed
 
for
 
this
 
to
 
be
 
realised.
 
Participants
 
described
 
the
 
future
 
with
 
much
 
concern,
 
indicating
 
that
 
the
 
average
 
northerner
 
is
 
aware
 
that
 
change
 
can
 
only
 
take
 
place
 
if 
 
certain
 
norms,
 
limitations
 
and
 
challenges
 
are
 
dealt
 
with.
 
Disparities
 
need
 
to
 
be
 
addressed,
 
in
 
which
 
the
 
rich
 
can
 
gain
 
access
 
to
 
all
 
applications
 
while
 
the
 
poor
 
cannot
 
get
 
access
 
even
 
to
 
basic
 
information
 
that
 
they
 
might
 
need.
 
Technical
 
and
 
financial
 
limitations
 
restrict
 
the
 
deployment
 
of 
 
fibre
 
cable
 
to
 
regions
 
that
 
need
 
them
 
such
 
as
 
Baffin
 
Island.
 
Training
 
and
 
capacity
 
development
 
for
 
northerners
 
to
 
deliver
 
and
 
support
 
the
 
basic
 
quality
 
of 
 
service
 
required
 
for
 
good,
 
stable
 
access
 
across
 
the
 
region
 
remains
 
an
 
issue.
 
There
 
also
 
needs
 
to
 
be
 
a
 
basic
 
of 
 
level
 
of 
 
digital
 
literacy
 
among
 
users.
 
Security
 
considerations
 
inhibit
 
the
 
building
 
of 
 
online
 
trust
 
for
 
business
 
opportunities
 
such
 
as
 
e
commerce,
 
and
 
need
 
to
 
be
 
addressing
 
in
 
future
 
infrastructure
 
such
 
as
 
smart
 
energy
 
grids.
 
This
 
present
 
state
 
of 
 
affairs
 
prevents
 
innovation,
 
development,
 
deployment,
 
and
 
eventual
 
access
 
to
 
new
 
technologies.
 
Participants
 
felt
 
government
 
has
 
played
 
a
 
limited
 
role
 
and
 
its
 
engagement
 
has
 
been
 
limited.
 
One
 
participant
 
asked,
 
“Where
 
is
 
the
 
Government
 
of 
 
Canada
 
in
 
this?”
 
They
 
would
 
like
 
to
 
see
 
government
 
incentives
 
that
 
strengthen
 
and
 
improve
 
bandwidth
 
and
 
connectivity,
 
drive
 
up
 
competitiveness;
 
and
 
they
 
would
 
like
 
to
 
see
 
government
 
be
 
more
 
proactive
 
in
 
responding
 
to
 
people’s
 
needs.
 
Current
 
government
 
subsidies
 
on
 
access
 
are
 
not
 
sustainable
 
and
 
they
 
provide
 
only
 
short
 
term
 
respite.
 
New
 
tax
 
regimes
 
on
 
goods
 
and
 
services
 
could
 
be
 
explored
 
to
 
take
 
local
 
realities
 
into
 
consideration.
 
For
 
instance,
 
entertainment
 
goods
 
could
 
be
 
taxed
 
in
 
order
 
to
 
subsidize
 
environmental
 
and
 
social
 
services
 
on
 
the
 
internet.
 
Access
 
to
 
government
 
services
 
should
 
be
 
available
 
free
 
of 
 
charge.
 
Access
 
is
 
the
 
major
 
and
 
most
 
significant
 
challenge
 
for
 
northerners;
 
and
 
participants
 
viewed
 
that
 
access
 
to
 
this
 
form
 
of 
 
communications
 
should
 
be
 
considered
 
a
 
basic
 
“human
 
right”
 
for
 
citizens.
 
 
Issue
 
Identification
 
Process
 
What 
 
are
 
burning
 
issues
 
or
 
key
 
questions
 
about 
 
the
 
internet 
 
today
 
and
 
its
 
role
 
in
 
Canadian
 
economy/society
 
as
 
it 
 
relates
 
to
 
digital
 
economy?
 
The
 
burning
 
issues
 
were
 
grouped
 
into
 
three
 
baskets:
 
1.
 
Access
 
and
 
cost
 
2.
 
Technology,
 
security,
 
connectivity
 
to
 
the
 
wider
 
world
 
within
 
and
 
within
 
the
 
region
 
3.
 
The
 
absence
 
of 
 
policies/public
 
policy
 
needed
 
1.0
 
 Access
 
and
 
Cost 
 
1.1
 
Basket 
 
of 
 
Issues
 
 
Burning
 
issues:
 
Access
 
should
 
be
 
available
 
throughout
 
the
 
country
 
and
 
across
 
the
 
board.
 
 
In
 
the
 
north,
 
quality
 
is
 
low
 
and
 
bandwidth
 
is
 
expensive.
 
 
Equivalent
 
level
 
of 
 
service
 
must
 
exist
 
regardless
 
of 
 
geographic
 
location
 
and
 
wealth.
 
1.2
 
Current 
 
Status
 
 
Internet
 
is
 
available,
 
but
 
cost
 
is
 
high
 
and
 
prohibitive.
 
 
Current
 
high
 
cost
 
applies
 
downward
 
pressure
 
on
 
access.
 
 
Present
 
situation
 
is
 
not
 
healthy
 
for
 
businesses.
 
1.3
 
Barriers
 
 
Geographic
 
isolation,
 
limiting
 
connectivity
 
with
 
rest
 
of 
 
the
 
world.
 
 
The
 
north
 
is
 
not
 
on
 
any
 
digital
 
highway.
 
 
Its
 
low
 
population
 
base
 
may
 
be
 
to
 
its
 
disadvantage,
 
but
 
should
 
it
 
be?
 
It
 
is
 
not
 
China
 
[ie,
 
not
 
the
 
population
 
base
 
of 
 
China],
 
therefore
 
it
 
may
 
not
 
be
 
economically
 
viable
 
for
 
investments
 
in
 
infrastructure.
 
 
Potential
 
revenues
 
are
 
not
 
great
 
enough
 
to
 
offset
 
the
 
expense/investment.
 
 
There
 
is
 
little
 
incentive
 
for
 
updating
 
infrastructure
 
and
 
existing
 
technologies.
 
 
It
 
depends
 
highly
 
on
 
government
 
subsidies
 
and
 
thus
 
is
 
unsustainable.
 
Government
 
can
 
pull
 
the
 
plug
 
at
 
any
 
time.
 
1.4
 
Opportunities
 
Opportunities
 
in
 
the
 
local
 
economy
 
will
 
emerge
 
when
 
access
 
is
 
dealt
 
with.
 
For
 
instance,
 
 
Reducing
 
travel
 
costs:
 
cost
 
of 
 
travel
 
to
 
Grise
 
Fiord
 
vs
 
ability
 
to
 
video
 
conference.
 
 
E
health:
 
sending
 
xrays
 
to
 
doctors
 
in
 
Ottawa;
 
also
 
robotic
 
surgeries
 
 –
 
need
 
easy
 
access
 
to
 
infrastructure
 
and
 
bandwidth.
 
 
Dispersed
 
families
 
need
 
affordable
 
and
 
better
 
quality
 
access
 
as
 
a
 
social
 
tool.
 
 
 
There
 
is
 
a
 
need
 
for
 
access
 
to
 
social
 
media
 
 –
 
a
 
fundamental
 
access
 
to
 
participation
 
for
 
citizens.
 
 
Many
 
Northerners
 
cannot
 
afford
 
a
 
home
 
computer
 
therefore
 
they
 
also
 
need
 
public
 
access
 
facilities.
 
 
If 
 
the
 
access
 
problem
 
in
 
the
 
north
 
can
 
be
 
dealt
 
with
 
through
 
innovation,
 
it
 
presents
 
an
 
opportunity
 
for
 
Canada
 
and
 
Canadian
 
businesses
 
to
 
offer
 
such
 
opportunities
 
globally
 
to
 
countries
 
with
 
similar
 
access
 
challenges.
 
1.5
 
 Actors
 
and
 
Stakeholders
 
 
Government.
 
 
But
 
participants
 
also
 
noted
 
the
 
challenge
 
for
 
leadership
 
in
 
that
 
the
 
Internet
 
is
 
not
 
owned
 
by
 
any
 
one
 
government
 
or
 
country.
 
 
Federal,
 
provincial,
 
private,
 
non
profit,
 
public
 
forums,
 
community
 
leaders,
 
citizens
 
2.0
 
Technology,
 
security,
 
connectivity
 
to
 
the
 
wider
 
world
 
and
 
within
 
the
 
region
 
2.1
 
Basket 
 
of 
 
Issues
 
 
Rollout
 
of 
 
IPv6,
 
improved
 
satellite
 
technologies
 
and
 
more
 
modern
 
satellites
 
in
 
orbit
 
with
 
footprints
 
to
 
cover
 
the
 
north
 
 
Deployment
 
of 
 
local
 
fibre/microwave/UAV
 
technologies
 
and
 
interconnected
 
fibre
 
networks
 
between
 
communities.
 
 
Development
 
and
 
deployment
 
of 
 
local
 
networks
 
(fibre/microwave)
 
connected
 
to
 
local
 
servers
 
for
 
shared
 
local
 
resources
 
and
 
content.
 
 
Improved
 
security
 
for
 
such
 
local
 
networks.
 
 
Reliability
 
and
 
cost
 
factors
 
were
 
also
 
tabled.
 
 
Cost
 
should
 
be
 
commensurate
 
with
 
reliability.
 
 
The
 
quality
 
of 
 
service
 
must
 
be
 
reflective
 
of 
 
the
 
cost.
 
 
Participants
 
described
 
quality
 
of 
 
service
 
(QoS)
 
as
 
less
 
dropped
 
calls,
 
consistent
 
speed,
 
long
 
term
 
stability.
 
2.2
 
Current 
 
Status
 
 
Security
 
is
 
improving;
 
in
 
general.
 
 
More
 
people
 
seem
 
to
 
understand
 
that
 
security
 
must
 
be
 
addressed.
 
 
People
 
must
 
remain
 
vigilant
 
in
 
order
 
to
 
respond
 
to
 
emerging
 
threats.
 
 
There
 
is
 
a
 
need
 
for
 
user
 
education
 
and
 
awareness
 
re:
 
spam,
 
identity
 
theft,
 
etc.
 
 
What
 
can
 
people
 
do
 
to
 
keep
 
themselves
 
secure?
 

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