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Scribe: The Habs Literary Journal, Autumn 2010

Scribe: The Habs Literary Journal, Autumn 2010

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Published by: scribe1264 on Dec 20, 2010
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03/28/2011

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THE HABS LITERARY JOURNALAUTUMN 2010
 S  c  r  i   b   e 
  |    A u t  u m n 2  0  1  0 
 
During my tenure as Editor of 
Scribe
what has been most uncanny is the commonality between the piecessubmitted. Look out for the sun; for lanes, for long a
ernoons and whispered tales of Winter in thisedition – for alienation, for nervousness, for
tension
.
e tension is, as Orwell noted, probably the converse of the feeling one had in the times beforecentral heating when Spring arrived. He claimed that the main reason that Spring was so celebrated, whyChaucer spoke of Zephirus blowing and April’s ‘shoures soote’, was because everybody was so elated that Winter had
nally ended.
e coats went back into the closets, the lights lasted longer and brighter, andmost importantly, the harvest came, o
en saving young children days away from death by starvation.So it is unsurprising that this Autumn’s
Scribe
, while still funny and light as it has always been,is also a tense edition, tense about going into the darkness of Winter. Missen writes in
Winter 
of the‘petrifying cold’.
e icy wind ‘whips across the pristine tundra’ in Paul’s
Where No Man Treads
and inKaria’s
Styx 
, his protagonist admits that he is ‘unwelcome here’ as he meets his frosty reception. Even themoments of relaxation are lost in memory as in Bernstein’s
Today
or the ‘youthful exhilaration’ of the boysin Lewis’
e Journey
.
e natural response seems to have been to get a sense of remove, to do what Literature so o
endoes and escape from time and place. In Shah’s
 Bleak
, with the endless mining work of a grandfatherand in Sheth’s
 I Will Never Forget 
, where the eyes of war veterans glimmer from the dark cobwebs of memories passed down through generations, one theme stands out: timelessness, the eternalising of truthsand norms, the commonality of human experience.
is is what binds the edition together.In
e Straw Man and the Whale
, I consider two big thinkers who have a huge ‘sense of remove’,removing themselves from time and place. It is this that we love most about Literature and it is this thatcharacterises our writers in this term’s
Scribe
, the sense of remove that characterises future novelists andbig thinkers, the future Orwells and Rushdies. We are tense in general with talk of cuts in the arts budget, cuts everywhere. Talk of Iran andIsrael, talk of Kashmir in India, talk of Conan and Leno, talk of tension everywhere, and here we arealways very tense. On the rugby pitch or in the exam hall, on a running track or in a classroom - yet veryrarely do we talk about it. Rarely is it mentioned that we are fraught with anxiety and it is rarer still that we are given the bigger picture, a sense of timelessness.In Moore’s
Watchmen
a character called
e Comedian, a brutal man, laughs at tragedies in lifeand says that ‘it’s all a joke’. As this burly man runs around leaving a trail of destruction in the Vietnamsand Koreas, he laughs at his mistakes because it is his release. It is like imagining a high wire trapeze artiststriding con
dently and then falling o
 
. In the moment before he collapses, before one is aware of theimplications, a smile breaks out as the tension is released. Relief. No longer does the high wire artist haveto do his job, no longer does the student have to pass his exams or win the sports match – in that moment,suspended in laughter, time vanishes and happiness is immortal.  We laugh and then we dream.
 Ameya Tripathi, Editor
e Editorial
 Ameya Tripathi U6H2
Editor
Tom Ough U6C2
Publishing O
cer
Oliver Goldstein U6C2
Deputy Editor
 Features
David Joels U6R2
Deputy Editor
Short Stories
Marco Marcello U6R2
Deputy Editor
 Poetry
 Arnie Birss U6C1
Copy Editor
 Poetry
David Lawrence U6H1
Copy Editor
Short Stories
Nikhil Subbiah U6S2
Copy Editor
 Features
 Jordan Bernstein 8R 
 Junior Editor
 Andrew Djaba 10S1
 Junior Editor
 Joseph Salem 11S2
Artist
Shaneil Shah L6J2
Artist
Zak Kay L6R1
Advertising O
cer
Mr T-S. Li
Supervising 
 
Editor
Scribe
2010 Editorial Team
Email submissions for the Spring 2011 edition of 
Scribe
to scribe@habsboys.org.uk
Scribe
| Autumn 201049
Scribe
| Autumn 2010
 
Akshay-Kishan Karia
e Night of the New Moon
Nobody is frightened. Nobody is depressed. Nobody is awake.
ere was the eccentric entrepreneur, the busy businessman, the poetic playwright, the seductive sales- woman, the unfamiliar usher, the solemn shopkeeper and the cra
 y criminal. Rest. Now, it seems thereis nothing. 
e people are in bed, as are the products of the various shops, no longer busy trying to pose in a way that makes them presentable and attractive, in their time of rest. Everyone and everything is asleep.Even the reels of red tape, the computers, the cash-registers, the rakes and the uncooked foods revel inthe glorious time of slumber.
e city is sleeping.
e city is dead!
   
uick! Call for help! It is nowhere tobe found. Is this not reason to be afraid?Nobody answers.Beware. Silence screams at its highest volume, echoing throughout the city, like the schoolmas-ter, desperunaware that they will rarely come true. Night is truly just a blissful day, the day everyoneactually enjoys, and an escape from the torture of the next morning.
 
 Will Missen,
Winter 
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2Siddharth Sheth,
Silent Witness
.............................................................. 2 Jordan Bernstein
 , Poem of Poems.......................................................... 3
Anonymous,
 Keeping Up Appearances
......................................................... 4Daniel Paul,
Where No Man Tread 
s. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5Rohit Bhatia,
 Room 101
..................................................................... 6Ben Peacock,
 A Parting of Ways –
e A 
   
ermath
............................................... 10Ragavan Guneshalingham,
 Leap
.............................................................. 12 Jordan Bernstein,
Today
..................................................................... 14Corey Lewis,
e Journey
.................................................................... 15Siddharth Sheth,
 I Will Never Forget 
.......................................................... 17Daniel Paul,
 Liberation
...................................................................... 18 William
ong,
 Forbidden Heroics
........................................................... 19 James Conophy,
e Railway Experience
...................................................... 21 Jordan Bernstein,
 My Autumn
................................................................ 23Daniel Gold,
 Allie’s Baseball Mitt 
............................................................ 24Akshay Kishan Karia,
 An alternative continuation to ‘Odour of Chrysantheumums’ 
................ 25Shaneil Shah,
 Bleak
 ......................................................................... 26Harry Jukes,
 A sequel to ‘Of Mice and Men’ 
..................................................... 26Ameya Tripathi,
e Straw-Man and 
e Whale
............................................... 27Nakul Khanna,
e Weeping Willow
.......................................................... 34Siddharth Sheth,
Sarcasm
.................................................................... 36 William Yarwood,
 Home
.................................................................... 37 Jonathan Adams,
 A Common O
    
ence
......................................................... 38Ameya Tripathi,
Summer in Paris
............................................................. 39 Jacob Harris,
e Key
........................................................................ 40Andrew Djaba,
‘ 
e Social Networkreviewed 
................................................. 43Akshay Kishan Karia,
Styx 
................................................................... 44 Joe Salem,
 A Chemical Anthology
............................................................. 45Anand Gudka,
 In Hague’s Fields
.............................................................. 46Ameya Tripathi,
e Buttery Mosque
.......................................................... 47
Contents
Co
er designed by Joseph Salem, with grateful thanks to Garry Byrne and Faber and Faber 
Scribe
| Autumn 20101

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