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Individual-based model formulation for cutthroat trout, Little Jones Creek

Individual-based model formulation for cutthroat trout, Little Jones Creek

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Published by: PACIFIC SOUTHWEST RESEARCH STATION REPORT on Dec 21, 2010
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I
ndividual
-
Based
 
ModelFormulation
for
CutthroatTrout,Little Jones
 
Creek, California
Steven
F. R
ailsback
 
Bret
C.
Harvey
United StatesDepartmentof AgricultureForest Service
Pacific SouthwestResearch Station
General Technical ReportPSW-GTR-182
 
Publisher
Albany, CaliforniaMailing address:PO Box 245, Berkeley CA94701-0245(510) 559-6300http://www.psw.fs.fed.us
 June 2001
Pacific Southwest Research Station
Forest Service
U.S. Department of Agriculture
Abstract
Railsback, Steven F.; Harvey, Bret C. 2001.
Individual-based model formulation for cutthroattrout, Little Jones Creek, California.
Gen. Tech. Rep. PSW-GTR-182. Albany, CA: PacificSouthwest Research Station, Forest Service, U. S. Department of Agriculture; 80 p.
This report contains the detailed formulation of an individual-based model(IBM) of cutthroat trout developed for three study sites on Little Jones Creek, DelNorte County, in northwestern California. The model was designed to supportresearch on relations between habitat and fish population dynamics, theimportance of small tributaries to trout populations, and the usefulness of individual-based models for forest management. The model simulates the fulltrout life cycle at a daily time step; habitat is modeled at a resolution of severalsquare meters. The major trout activities simulated are spawning, habitatselection (movement), feeding and growth, and mortality. Two feeding strategiesare simulated: drift feeding and searching for stationary food. Mortality risksinclude starvation, aquatic predation, terrestrial predation, high temperature,stranding, and high velocity. Movement maximizes the probability of survivingand attaining reproductive size over a future time horizon. Risks to incubatingtrout eggs include extreme temperatures, dewatering, and scouring by highflows. The model design approach was adapted from complex adaptive systemstheory.
Retrieval Terms
: cutthroat trout, habitat selection, individual-based model,population model, salmonids
The Authors
Steven F. Railsback
is an environmental scientist with Lang, Railsback & Associates, 250 California Avenue, Arcata CA 95521; e-mail:LRA@Northcoast.com.
Bret C. Harvey
is a research fish biologist with the Pacific Southwest ResearchStation, USDA Forest Service, 1700 Bayview Drive, Arcata CA 95521; e-mail: bch3@humboldt.edu.
Acknowledgments
The Little Jones Creek cutthroat trout model was developed under Research Joint Venture Agreement PSW-99-007-RJVA between the Pacific SouthwestResearch Station, USDA Forest Service’s Redwood Sciences Laboratory, andLang, Railsback & Associates (LRA). Collaborative funding for softwaredevelopment and model testing was provided to LRA by the Electric PowerResearch Institute (EPRI). The trout model software is developed and maintained by Steve Jackson, Jackson Scientific Computing, McKinleyville, California. JimPetersen, Columbia River Laboratory, U. S. Geological Survey, provided avaluable review of a previous draft of this document. Tom Lisle, PacificSouthwest Research Station, Arcata, California, helped develop the approach weuse for modeling redd scouring. The
Swarm
program at the Santa Fe Institute(Santa Fe, New Mexico) has heavily influenced our approach to fish movementand the overall modeling philosophy.
 
Pacific SouthwestResearch Station
USDA Forest ServiceGeneral TechnicalReportPSW-GTR-182
 June 2001
Contents
In Brief .....................................................................................................................ivI. Introduction............................................................................................................. 1
I.A. Fundamental Approach and Assumptions ............................................ 2I.B. Study Site....................................................................................................... 3I.C. Conventions.................................................................................................. 4I.C.1. Units ................................................................................................. 4I.C.2. Parameter and Variable Names .................................................. 4I.C.3 Survival Probabilities and Mortality Sources........................... 4I.C.4. Dates, Days, and Fish Ages ......................................................... 4I.C.5. Habitat Cell Conventions............................................................. 4
II. Model Initialization ........................................................................................... 5
II.A. Habitat Initialization ................................................................................ 5II.B. Fish Initialization ...................................................................................... 5II.C. Redd Initialization .................................................................................... 6
III. Habitat Model...................................................................................................... 6
III.A. Cell Boundaries and Dimensions........................................................... 7III.B. Daily Flow, Temperature, and Turbidity ............................................. 7III.C. Depth and Velocity ................................................................................... 7III.D. Velocity Shelter Availability ................................................................... 8III.E. Spawning Gravel Availability ................................................................ 8III.F. Distance to Hiding Cover ........................................................................ 8III.G. Food Production and Availability ......................................................... 8III.G.1. Production.................................................................................... 9III.G.2. Availability ................................................................................ 10III.H. Day Length ............................................................................................... 10
IV. Fish Model.......................................................................................................... 10
IV.A. Spawning .................................................................................................. 11IV.A.1. Determine Spawn Readiness .................................................. 11IV.A.2. Identify Redd Location ............................................................ 11IV.A.3. Make Redd ................................................................................. 12IV.B. Movement................................................................................................. 12IV.B.1. Departure Rules ........................................................................ 13IV.B.2. Destination Rules...................................................................... 13
Individual-Based ModelFormulation for Cutthroat Trout,Little Jones Creek, California

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