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September-October 2010 Roadrunner Newsletter, Kern-Kaweah Sierrra Club

September-October 2010 Roadrunner Newsletter, Kern-Kaweah Sierrra Club

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Published by: Kern Kaweah Sierrra Club on Dec 30, 2010
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12/30/2010

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 A BI
-
MONTHLY PUBLICATION OF THE KERN
-
KAWEAH CHAPTER OF SIERRA CLUB SEPT./OCTOBER, 2010
 The Roadrunner
PANORAMA VISTA CHALLENGE TO LOCAL ENVIRONMENTALISTS
 
Three groups join forces to establish, develop and maintain 950
-
 acre Kern River Corridor 
The Panorama Vista Preserveconsists of over 950 acres on bothsides of the Kern River below thePanorama Bluffs. In the late1990s, ARCO (which had boththe mineral rights and surfaceownership of what is now themajority of the Preserve) made itknown that they were willing tosell the surface rights.A coalition of of three groups,the Kern River ParkwayAssociation, the Kern Equestriansand the Kern River AccessCommittee were
 
given an optionto buy the property if they couldraise $118,000.Eventually, after the funds wereraised, and the propertypurchased, a new entity, the KernRiver Corridor Endowment,wasformed to manage the property.Eventually, ARCO returned the$118,000 to the Kern RiverCorridor Endowment to be usedas an endowment.About five years ago a few of usbegan a small scale revegetationproject. We had gathered valleyoak acorns from Windwolves andCalifornia sycamore seeds fromthe sycamores already growing onthe Preserve. With the help of Steve Hampson, we laid out adrip irrigation system that drewwater from the well of the smallneighboring community.In the fall of 2006 we wereready to plant and began our trialand error learning process. Withthe help of Boy Scouts and theirparents we planted about 100oaks and acorns after havingmade chicken wire baskets toprotect the seedlings fromrodents. When our planting daywas over all but three seedlingswere protected by chicken wiretop and bottom. The next morningthe three unprotected had beenchewed off. The oaks seemed todo okay but most of thesycamores lost their foliage.However, the next spring, most of the sycamore leafed out and weseemed to be off to a good start.But that was the spring of the“false chinch bugs”—tiny
 —Please turn to page 2
Our annual Fall Banquet on Nov. 13 at Hodel’sCountry Dining, Kern Room, 5917 Knudsun Drivewill start with a no-host social hour at 5 p.m. anddinner at 6 p.m. This is an opportunity to meet andgreet and socialize. Invite your family, work buddies, neighbors, and friends. (No children underthe age of 7, please.) The Fall Banquet is a reachingout to the community to attract new members.We will explore what the Sierra Club is all aboutand why the Club is important to you and yourfamily.The $25 cost includes set-up, linens, security, taxand gratuity.For our program, Chapter activists will give anupdate on what they are doing and what successesthey have had.Reservations are a MUST, to be received no laterthan Thursday, Nov. 11 (checks only, no cash).Walk-ins cannot be accommodated.
See thereservation form on the back of this newsletter.
—Glen Shellcross, Buena Vista Chair
 Fa
Banquet set for Nov 13 at Hodel 
’ 
 s; reservations due on Nov. 11
 PLANTING FORTHE FUTURE
: Madi Evans and  Harry Love ar 
  potting plants a
t
 the PanoramaVista Nurserybelow Panorama Drive near  Bakers
  fi
eld Co
ege.
 Photo/Courtesyof Andy Honig 
 
THE ROADRUNNER
SEPT./OCTOBER, 2010
sucking bugs which appeared in the millions. Beforewe realized what was happening we had lost almostour entire planting.But we persevered and replanted (mostly sycamoresbecause we didn’t have any more oaks), and thesesycamores did well.Two years ago a new grove next to the river wasstarted with the help of Bill Cooper and Rich O’Neil.This was named the Hampson Grove after SteveHampson who had tragically died. The HampsonGrove was not connected to drip irrigation and had tobe hand watered with cat litter jugs of water that Itrucked from home. In 2009 we got a grant from theKern Wildlife Commission to purchase a 525 tank,trailer and pump. We got permission to pump waterfrom the river and our burden was lessened.This brings us to 2009 when, with the help of ScottFrazer of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, wereceived a couple of grants to enable us to have anirrigation system installed for a new 30-acre grove.An old well, dating from the 1940s was refurbished.In early February, with the help of many friends,including Sierra Clubbers, we gathered thousands of willow, cottonwood and mulefat cuttings and putthem in containers of water to (we thought) soon beplanted. The crucial thing was for P.G.&E. to provideelectricity for the well pump.Finally, in late April after PG&E postponements,the water system was up and running and we, withmany volunteers, planted a couple thousand trees andshrubs over the next two months. Active in workingon planting was Harry Love, a Kern-Kaweah Chapteractivist and Audubon member who organizedAudubon work parties,Meanwhile Bill Cooper, Phil Shepard and RichO’Neil constructed a nursery for the propagation andholding of nursery stock.The Hampson Grove and the nursery continue to bewatered from the trailer tank, but we have recentlyconnected a water system from the well to our firstgrove and soon will be tying our nursery and theHampson Grove to the watering system thanks to a$3000 grant awarded us by the Kern-KaweahChapter.We have made a great deal of progress in ourrevegetation but the story is not over. Volunteer or just come by and see how things are coming along.Go to our web site
to learnmore, to see where we are, and learn how to contactus.—Andy Honig
Sierra Club California is again making recommendationsfor several initiatives appearing on the upcoming ballot inNovember. For more information, see:
 
No on
 
Proposition 18:
The Safe, Clean, and ReliableDrinking Water Supply Act of 2010.This November, California voters will vote on an $11.1billion water bond. Sierra Club California opposes thewater bond and urges voters to reject it.This bond would obligate the state to pay back more than$800 million in bond debt every year for the next 30 years.These payments would further stress our general fund,providing $800 million less for schools, parks, socialservices, police protection and fire services. It seemsunwise to add these huge annual payments to a budget witha projected shortfall of $21 billion by 2011. 
No on Proposition 23:
Proposed Big Oil Initiative.Big Texas oil companies are trying to buy their way out of cleaning up their California refineries and fuels.Companies like Valero and Tesoro recently announced thatthey plan on fully funding a November ballot initiative thatwould halt clean energy efforts and pollution controlstandards aimed at cleaning up our air and atmosphere forour kids and future generations.
Yes on Proposition 25
: Proposition 25, which wouldallow state budgets to be passed by a simple majority of 
Sierra Club o
ff 
ers viewpoints on November ballot initiatives
each house of the Legislature. The anti-democratic two-thirds requirement for passing budgets has createdopportunities for anti-environmental mischief. One of themost egregious examples came in 2007, when 14 SenateRepublicans held the budget hostage to their demand fornon-fiscal legislation weakening the CaliforniaEnvironmental Quality Act’s application to globalwarming.
Yes on Proposition 21:
The California State ParksInitiative. The State Parks and Wildlife Conservation TrustFund Act of 2010, would provide a stable, reliable andadequate source of funding to protect state parks andconserve wildlife.“With our state parks facing an insurmountable fundingcrisis and irreparable damage, it is essential we provide ourparks with a sustainable and reliable funding stream,” saidJim Metropulos, Senior Advocate of Sierra ClubCalifornia. “For years California’s 278 state parks havebeen an integral public asset that residents and visitorsalike enjoyed, and it is imperative we maintain thesepriceless assets for our children and future generations.”Proposition 21 would ensure a dedicated and reliablefunding stream for state parks through an $18 annual StatePark Access Pass surcharge and, in return, would providevehicles subject to the surcharge free, year-roundadmission to state parks.
PANORAMA VISTA: Chapter donates$3000 to support watering system
Continued 
  ' 
om page 1
 )
 
THE ROADRUNNER
SEPT./OCTOBER, 2010
FROM THE CHAIR 
 Fa
 " 
inspires renewed dedication to ongoing projects
The end of summer…and wherever you wandered, I hopeyou are back safely, with adventures to share. This time of year means many things to us in the Kern-KaweahChapter. First, we urge you to look over the Sierra Clubendorsements for the November ballot. Next, beautifulSierra Club calendars are once again being offered for saleas a Chapter fundraiser. Be sure to see the article onCalendar contacts. And last, Chapter and Group ExecutiveCommittee elections are coming up. Have you consideredbecoming a candidate ?On a sad note, two of our long-time Chapter memberspassed away this summer – Chris Geyer and JeanPretorious. Both of these active women gave not only theirmoney, but their time to the Sierra Club. We will miss theirfamiliar, warm smiles at Chapter events, but they bothleave inspiration in our hearts. How fortunate we were toknow Chris and Jean, and count them as friends of theenvironment.The end of summer…if you enjoyed a winding trailthrough wild places, clear blue skies, sparkling waters, andpristine open spaces, thank an environmental group. Weencourage you to give back by doing your part to make adifference. Seasons pass and time passes quickly.Get out there and dosomething good for our natural world today!—Georgette TheotigKern-Kaweah Chapter Chair
Giant SequoiaNational  Monumen
t
 campout coming Sept. 24
-
26
The Kern-Kaweah Chapter of Sierra Club is encouraging membersand friends to join in a camp out andhike Sept. 24-26 in one of the mostmagnificent sequoia groves in theGiant Sequoia National Monument.Sponsoring the event are the SierraClub/Sequoia Task Force and TuleRiver ConservancySequoia Task Force Chair CarlaCloer, Vice-Chair Joe Fontaine,Sequoia Forest Keeper AraMarderosian, and Rich Kangas areleading the activities. Meet folkswho were instrumental in creatingthe Monument and who now fightfor real protection of these forests.See why these groves need to bereunited with the rest of theirecosystem under the management of Sequoia National Park.We will camp near Quaking Aspenat the headwaters of the South Fork of the Middle Fork of the Tule Riverabout one and a half hours fromPorterville.Our downhill hike on Saturdaymorning will begin after a no-hostbreakfast. We will discuss past andplanned future activities in the groveand the latest on the Forest Service'sattempt to re-do their ManagementPlan. Bring lunch to munch at a siteby the Tule River.An optional afternoon trip will beoffered to tour the Trail of 100Giants, discuss the Forest Service’srecent expansion and tree removalprojects there, and pay tribute to theunmarked Sequoia where PresidentClinton created this Giant SequoiaNational Monument. Saturday nightwill feature a potluck supper.Participation is optional.For Sunday morning a two-hourround-trip hike is planned down theFreeman Creek Grove Trail wherethe Forest Service, with no notice,replaced every stream crossing withwooden bridges and banked the trailfor bike speed. For those who don'thave to rush home, we will concludethe weekend with a short hike to thetop of Dome Rock to see anoverview of the Kern River and thesite of the McNally fire.You MUST contact Carla at 559 .781.8445 or at
bySept. 8 to reserve your place as spaceis limited.Membership in Sierra Club,SequoiaForest Keeper,or Tule RiverConservancyis not required. There is nofee for theouting.Directionsand moreinformationwill be sentto thosewho makereservations.To receive alerts and newslettersby mail, send your name and addressto "Sequoia Task Force," or "TuleRiver Conservancy," P.O. Box 723,Porterville CA 93257. —Carla Cloer
FOR PDF VERSION OF NEWSLETTER
E-mail Lorraine Unger at
lorraineunger@att.net 
and ask to be taken off the hardcopy list.
 
Log on to
 http://kern kaweah.sierraclub.org/email.html 
 
and join theKERN-NEWS email list.
 

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