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Story of Stuff - Vocabulary Only

Story of Stuff - Vocabulary Only

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The transcript of "Story of Stuff" with some words translated into spanish.
The transcript of "Story of Stuff" with some words translated into spanish.

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Categories:Types, School Work
Published by: Juan José Alonso Tresguerres on Dec 30, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/31/2014

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Do you have one of these? I got a little obsessed with mine, in fact I got a littleobsessed with all my stuff. Have you ever wondered where all the stuff we buy comes fromand where it goes when we throw it out? I couldn’t stop wondering about that. So I looked itup. And what the text books said is that our stuff simply moves along these stages: extractionto production to distribution to consumption to disposal
1
. All together, it’s called thematerials economy.Well, I looked into it a little bit more.
In fact,
I spent 10 years travelling the worldtracking where our stuff comes from and where it goes.
 
And you know what I found out? Thatis not the whole story. There’s a lot missing from this explanation. For one thing, this systemlooks like it’s fine.
(1:00)
No problem. But the truth is it’s a system in crisis. And the reasonit is in crisis is that it is a linear system and we live on a finite planet and you can not run alinear system on a finite planet indefinitely.
 
Every step along the way, this system isinteracting with the real world. In real life it’s not happening on a blank white page. It’sinteracting with societies, cultures, economies, the environment. And all along the way, it’sbumping up
2
 against limits. Limits we don’t see here because the diagram is incomplete. Solet’s go back through, let’s fill in some of the blanks and see what’s missing.
(1:37)
Well, one of the most important things that is missing is people. Yes, people.People live and work all along this system. And some people in this system matter a littlemore than others; some have a little more say. Who are they?Well, let’s start with the government. Now my friends
3
tell me I should use a tank tosymbolize the government and that’s true in many countries and increasingly in our own,after all more than 50% of our federal tax money is now going to the military,
(2:00)
but I’musing a person to symbolize the government because I hold true
3
to the vision and values thatgovernments should be of the people, by the people, for the people. It’s the government’sjob is to watch out for us, to take care of us. That’s their job.Then along came the corporation. Now, the reason the corporation looks bigger thanthe government is that the corporation is bigger than the government. Of the 100 largesteconomies on earth now, 51 are corporations.
 
As the corporations have grown in size andpower, we’ve seen a little change in the government where they’re a little more concernedin making sure everything is working out for those guys than for us. OK, so let’s see what elseis missing from this picture.
Extraction
(2:41)
We’ll start with extraction which is a fancy word for natural resourceexploitation which is a fancy
4
word for trashing
5
the planet. What this looks like is we chopdown
6
trees, we blow up mountains to get the metals inside, we use up
7
all the water and we
1
 
disposal
[
d
ɪ
'sp
əʊ
z
ə
l
]
(de basura)
eliminación.
2
 
bump
 
/b
ʌ
mp/
golpe, sacudida ,(collision) topetazo /
bump up
: aumentar /
bump up against
estarllegando al límite
3
 
En este contexto “defiendo”.
4
 
fancy
2
 
adj 
elaborado
ideas
extravagante
,
estrambótico; aquí….”elegante”
 
5
 
trash
1
 
/træʃ/
(
 AmE 
) basura
 / Verbo tr. (US)
destrozar 
6
 
chop down
cortar, talar.
7
 
use up
 
verbo transitivo
acabar, gastar:
they've used up all our sugar,
han acabado con el azúcar.
Story of Stuff
1
 
wipe out
8
the animals. So here we are running up against our first limit. We’re running out ofresources.
(3:00)
We are using too much stuff. Now I know this can be hard to hear, but it’sthe truth and we’ve gotta deal with it
9
. In the past three decades alone, one-third of theplanet’s natural resources base have been consumed.
 
Gone.We are cutting and mining and hauling
 and trashing the place so fast that we’reundermining the planet’s very ability for people to live here
. Where I live, in the UnitedStates, we have less than 4% of our original forests left.
 
Forty percent of waterways havebecome undrinkable.
 
And our problem is not just that we’re using too much stuff, but we’reusing more than our share. We [The U.S.] have 5% of the world’s population but we’reconsuming 30% of the world’s resources and creating 30% of the world’s waste. If everybodyconsumed at U.S. rates, we would need 3 to 5 planets.
 
And you know what? We’ve only gotone. So, my country’s response to this limitation is simply to go take someone else’s! This isthe Third World, which—some would say—is another word for our stuff that somehow got onsomeone else’s land
.
 
So what does that look like?
(4:08)
The same thing: trashing the place.• 75% of global fisheries
 now are fished at or beyond capacity• 80% of the planet’s original forests are gone.• In the Amazon alone, we’re losing 2000 trees a minute. That is seven football fieldsa minute.And what about the people who live here? Well. According to these guys, they don’town these resources even if they’ve been living there for generations, they don’t own themeans of production and they’re not buying a lot of stuff. And in this system, if you don’town or buy a lot of stuff, you don’t have value.
Production
(4:44)
So, next, the materials move to “production“ and what happens there is weuse energy to mix toxic chemicals in with the natural resources to make toxic contaminatedproducts.There are over 100,000 synthetic chemicals in commerce today.
(5:00)
Only a handfulof these have even been tested for human health impacts and NONE of them have beentested for synergistic health impacts, that means when they interact with all the otherchemicals we’re exposed to every day. So, we don’t know the full impact of these toxics onour health and environment of all these toxic chemicals. But we do know one thing: Toxics in,Toxics Out. As long as we keep putting toxics into our production system, we are going tokeep getting toxics in the stuff that we bring into our homes, our workplaces, and schools.And, duh
, our bodies.Like BFRs, brominated flame retardants. They are a chemical that make things morefireproof but they are super toxic.
 
They’re a neurotoxin—that means toxic to the brain. Whatare we even doing using a chemical like this? Yet we put them in our computers, ourappliances
, couches, mattresses
, even some pillows. In fact, we take our pillows, we
8
 
wipe out
(clean) limpiar, pasarle un trapo a (cancel) ‹deficit› cancelar; ‹lead/advantage› eliminar (destroy, eradicate) ‹species/population› exterminar.
9
Tenemos que enfrentarnos a la situación.
10
 
haul
[h
ɔ
:
l] tirar, arrastrar, transportar.
11
we’re undermining the planet’s very ability for people to live here: estamos agotando la capacidaddel planeta para que podamos vivir aquí.
12
Este es el tercer mundo que –algunos dirán- es una expresión para referirse a nuestras cosas que dealguna forma quedaron en tierras de otros.
13
 
Global fisheries
: recursos pesqueros.
14
 
Duh
\də,
usually with prolonged 
ə\ claro, obvio
15
 
appliance
[
ə'plaɪəns
]
nombre
dispositivo, electrodoméstico
16
 
mattress
 
/'mætrəs / /'mætrɪs/
colchón
Story of Stuff
2
 
douse
them in a neurotoxin and then we bring them home and put our heads on them for 8hours a night to sleep. Now, I don’t know, but it seems to me that in this country with somuch potential, we could think of a better way to stop our heads from catching on
 fire atnight.
(6:00)
These toxics build up
in the food chain and concentrate in our bodies. Do youknow what is the food at the top of the food chain with the highest levels of many toxiccontaminants? Human breast milk. That means that we have reached a point where thesmallest members of our societies—our babies— are getting their highest lifetime dose oftoxic chemicals from breastfeeding from their mothers.
 
Is that not an incredible violation?Breastfeeding must be the most fundamental human act of nurturing
; it should be sacredand safe. Now breastfeeding is still best and mothers should definitely keep breastfeeding,but we should protect it. They [government] should protect it. I thought they were lookingout for us. And of course, the people who bear the biggest brunt
 of these toxic chemicalsare the factory workers, many of whom are women of reproductive age.
 
They’re working withreproductive toxics, carcinogens and more. Now, I ask you, what kind of woman ofreproductive age would work in a job exposed to reproductive toxics, except one who had noother option?
(7:05)
And that is one of the “beauties” of this system. The erosion of localenvironments and economies here ensures a constant supply of people with no other option.Globally 200,000 people a day are moving from environments that have sustained them forgenerations, into cities
 
many to live in slums
, looking for work, no matter how toxic thatwork may be.
 
So, you see, it is not just resources that are wasted along this system, butpeople too. Whole communities get wasted.Yup
, toxics in, toxics out. A lot of the toxics leave the factory as products, but evenmore leave as by products, or pollution. And it’s a lot of pollution.
 
In the U.S., industryadmits to releasing over 4 billion pounds of toxic chemicals a year
 
and it’s probably a lot moresince that is only what they admit. So that’s another limit, because, yuck
, who wants tolook at and smell 4 billion pounds of toxic chemicals a year?
(8:00)
So, what do they do? Move the dirty factories overseas.
 
Pollute someone else’sland! But surprise, a lot of that air pollution is coming right back at us, carried by windcurrents.
Distribution
(8:11)
So, what happens after all these resources are turned into products? Well, itmoves here, for distribution. Now distribution means “selling all this toxic contaminatedjunk
as quickly as possible.” The goal here is to keep the prices down, keep the peoplebuying and keep the inventory moving.How do they keep the prices down? Well, they don’t pay the store workers very muchand skimp on
health insurance every time they can. It’s all about externalizing the costs.What that means is the real costs of making stuff aren’t captured in the price. In other words,we aren’t really paying for the stuff we buy.
17
 
douse
[
daʊs
]
1
empapar, mojar 
2
 
(fuego)
apagar 
18
 
catch
 /kæt
 ʃ 
/
on fire
:prender fuego
19
 
build up
(make bigger, stronger ) ‹muscles› fortalecer (accumulate) ‹supplies/experience› acumular.
20
 
nurture
 
/'nɜ:rtʃər /
||
/'nɜ:tʃə(r)/
child/person› criar, educar;
 
emotion/feeling› nutrir, alimentar 
21
 
brunt
[
brʌnt
]
nombre
 
to bear/take the brunt of sthg,
sufrir (lo peor de) algo
22
 
slum
[
slʌm
]
(usu pl)
barrio bajo, barriada -
figurado
pocilga
23
 
Yup
: (informal) yes
24
 
yuck
 
/jʌk/
,
/jək /
interjección
(colloq) ¡puaj! (fam)
25
 
 junk
 
/dʒʌŋk/
(discarded items) trastos (viejos), cachivaches (worthless stuff ) (colloq) basura
26
 
skimp
 /sk
ɪ
mp/(colloq)
to ~ (ON sth)
escatimar (algo) //
skimp on health insurance
= recortan susprestaciones sociales.
Story of Stuff
3

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