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CAFTCAD - BeSpoke Issue 2

CAFTCAD - BeSpoke Issue 2

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Published by Joseph Eiger

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Categories:Topics, Art & Design
Published by: Joseph Eiger on Dec 30, 2010
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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08/16/2013

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Our all MWS, October 23rd at Pinewood Studios, wasanother successul event or participating vendors. But whatmade this sale even more unique than previous sales was theaddition o a costume display.
 The installation consisted o costumed mannequins rom a multitude o shows designed by CAFTCAD members. Coordinated byBrenda Broer, the exhibit gave visitors an opportunity to view acollection o costumes with nothing in common but their interesting diversity. Such a presentation invited scrutiny o somethingnormally seen only in photographic images. But the audience’s boundless appetite or images and the costumer’s drive to create them makes or an ongoing and dynamicrelationship that never ceases to ascinate. This was an opportunityto indulge that bond and an invitation to the public to becomemore intimate with a range o creative cinematic ideas rsthand. Costumes provide a device that can help personiy ideals (whetherconrming stereotypes or complicating/undermining them),model mythology, place souls on display and create a guise or ourpsychology. They show us many worlds. Exhibits like this illustrate that diversity and also, by virtue o thesize o the collection, give a sense o the variety o styles and erasdesigners are expected to master in their eld. CAFTCAD hoped to illuminate the creativity o its membership andstrengthen the connection to our audience by presenting a venueor what costumes do best…and that is, simply, to be looked at.
COSTUMES ON DISPLAY  A WEALTH OF BARGAINS AT THE MOVIE WARDROBE SALE 
The Canadian Alliance of Film & Television Costume Arts & Design
CAFTCAD CELEBRATES COSTUME IN FILM
UP CLOSE
STORY BY LAURIE DREW 
FALL 2010 ISSUE 2
 
MARTHA MANN’S COSTUMES FOR“MARRIAGE OF FIGARO”
Bespoke congratulates Martha Mann on herrecent Dora Mavor Moore Award or OutstandingOriginal Costume Design. The Doras are presentedannually by Toronto Alliance or the PerormingArts in recognition o outstanding work in theatre,dance, and opera. Mann received the prestigiousaward or her work on Opera Atelier’s “Marriage o Figaro”, her debut show or the company. Atelier isa unique Toronto based opera company, specializingin Baroque operas. The company combines opera,ballet, and theatre elements rom the 17th and 18thcentury presenting them with a theatricality thatresonates with a modern audience.Mozart’s “Figaro” is a comic tale o indelity, deception, and ultimately orgiveness and love, in whichthe servants outsmart their betters with subterugeand cunning. Mann’s whimsical designs highlightthe Comedia Dell’Arte elements, echoing the originalperiod beautiully. This opera lends itsel to thevibrant colour and lavish embellishment so evocative o the Baroque period and Mann’s costumescapture the eervescent quality o Mozart’s operawith a particular emphasis on period detail. Stripedsilks, brocades and some newer abrics all meet tocreate a lush palette o textures or the period silhouettes, bringing a bygone era to lie on stage.Mann’s illustrious career has spanned severaldecades encompassing lm, television, theatre andopera. Considered one o Canada’s premier costumedesigners, her work has beenan inspiration to many youngdesigners. I recently had theopportunity to speak to herabout her experience Atelier’s“Marriage o Figaro”.
hat 
 
can 
 
you 
 
tell
 
us
 
 about 
 
de 
-
signing
 
for
a
telier
 ,
 a
 
company 
 
that 
 
specializes
 
in 
b
 aroque 
 
opera
 This particular production is actually very, very latein the Baroque period, and the design reected that.Atelier is beginning to branch out somewhat romthe Baroque strictures. “Figaro” was less amboyantand somewhat more realistic in its aesthetic, andI think that’s why they approached me to do thedesign.While working on the latest installmento BeSpoke, I have to admit I’m in aweo the sheer talent and diversity o our membership. CAFTCAD oers thecostume community a vehicle to cometogether or the greater good o ourcrat and our shared interests. The question has changed rom “Whatis CAFTCAD?” to “Why should I join?” O course being in the nucleus, it’s easyto ramble on about the many reasonswhy:Being part o a positive and denedalliance o Canadian costumers; communicating challenges and triumph inorums with ellow members; learningat one o the Catcademy weekends,whether one is a seasoned costumeror a student at Ryerson; gaining insightinto personal creative processes; networking, raising one’s prole in thevarious public avenues that CAFTCADoers; the website; the newsletter; thebiannual Movie Wardrobe Sales and, o course, the parties.For me, CAFTCAD represents developing my skills, some o which havenothing to do with costume directly,but the cosmos always nds a wayto bring it orward to my daytodaylie. I’m proud to still be learning andgrowing and, to coin a phrase, that is‘Priceless’.
ou 
 
 are 
 
no
 
stranger
 
to
 
opera
 ,
having
 
designed
 
for
b
oston 
l
yric 
 o
pera
 ,
eW 
ork 
ity 
o
pera
 ,
 and
g
limmerglass
o
pera
 
 among
 
other
 
companies
.
oW 
 
did
 
your
 
experience 
 
With 
a
telier
 
differ
 
from
 
your
 
previous
 
experiences
“Marriage o Figaro” began its theatrical lie as a play. Set toMozart’s dazzling music, it lives on as a great opera. It has a wonderul character basedstory and is more realistic less ridiculousthan operas tend to be. Also Marshall (Pynkoski, the director)had a very clear vision or the style o the production. He madeinteresting changes to the accepted conventions. For example,the chorus is usually portrayed as “happy peasants” that work onthe land, but in Atelier’s production, they were servants in thepalace and dressed accordingly. This lead to a unity o look thatis not generally seen in “Figaro”.
hat 
 
Was
 
your
 
favorite 
 
costume 
 
or
 
 aspect 
 
of 
“f 
igaro
”? 
Well my avorite part o any production is always when it lookson stage like it did in my head! As or a avorite costume, it’salmost impossible to choose, but I’ve always loved characterclothing. Characters like the gardener, who is on stage or onlya ew brie moments throughout the opera, oer the chance tohave some un with the detail o the costume. I also enjoyed thiscostume because I did much o the breakdown mysel.
 a
telier
 
is
 
 a
 
ballet 
-
opera
 
company 
 ,
What 
 
challenges
 
Were 
 
pre 
-
sented
 
by 
 
the 
 
inclusion 
 
of 
 
dancers
Because it’s an operaballet, the dancers are equally as importantas the singers. This is very unique, as most opera companiessimply cut the music which was originally written or the dancers,or use it as scene change music, but do not include dancers intheir production. In “Figaro” the dancers aorded me a greatopportunity to underscore that the opera is set in Spain. Duringthe late 18th century, Spanish nobles dressed very much in theFrench and Italian style, so it was difcult to show the uniqueSpanish style. For Atelier’s production, the ballet corps were castas a troupe o Spanish dancers in the employ o Count Almaviva. This was a common practice in those days. Perorming troupes,dancers, actors, musicians and the like, were kept on retainer bywealthy patrons and they would perorm at dinners and specialevents. Through the dancers, we were not only able to revealthe country the story takes place in, but echo the conventionso late 18th century arts culture, as Mozart himsel would havehad a wealthy patron or whom he composed and perormedon a regular basis....CONTINUE READING ON INSIDE BACK COVER
new 
 
members
 
Laurie Drew, Costume DesignerMichael Ground, Costume DesignerPeter Olczak, Costume DesignerAlexis Honce, StylistMarie Grogan Hales, Asst DesignerJanet Cavanagh, Asst DesignerLisa D’Arcy, Truck/ SetMartino Nguyen Designs, CISFreda’s, Business MemberBelita Belle, Business Member
BY JENNIFER BUNT 
LeTTer
FrOm THe
PresIDenT 
cOnTrIbuTOrs
 
ALEYA GIBSON
, LAURIE DREWLORI GARDNER, MELLISSA STEWARTSILVANA SACCO, JENNIFER BUNT
cOmmITTee
 
KRISTEN O’REILLY - CO-CHAIR
LOREEN LIGHTFOOT  COCHAIRJOANNA SYROKOMLA TAMIYO TOMIHIRO  COPY EDITORLUIS SEQUEIRA  MANAGING EDITORJOSEPH EIGER  ART DIRECTOR 
LUIS SEQUEIRA
 
COSTUME DESIGN IS MONIQUE PRUDHOMME’S PERFECT FIT
CAFTCAD was honoured to have Vancouverbased Costume Designer, Monique Prudhommeas our guest speaker or the opening night o this year’s CAFTCADEMY weekend last April.Ater hearing her speak, it was clear that weneeded to know more.
January 2010 – Monique’s excellence in her crat was recognized by her peerswith an Oscar nomination or “The Imaginarium o Doctor Parnassus” alongwith 2 wins: a Costume Designers Guild Award and a Satellite Award. Needlessto say,” the experience was overwhelming and it took awhile to get real”.With wide parameters and a clear vision rom Director Terry Gilliam,Monique embarked on a “hunt and gather or her characters”. The projectwas “an all engaging and antastic collaborative rom each department.It was the dream job that she “wishes or all designers to experience”.Her 30 year journey to the point o receiving these accolades has taken someinteresting turns. Originally rom Montreal, Monique studied ne art with aplan to teach art at the high school level. However, once there, discovered shereally didn’t want to be a teacher and “hated it with a passion”.Always interested in lm and costumes, she coldcalled a production in townand oered hersel as an intern. A period lm with boots, buttons and busks,all new to her, she jumped in “watched and learned and gured it out”.Now on the right path, she continued with other productions, graduallylearning about costuming. Within a ew years the rst design oer came. Usingthe sink or swim technique, she gured it out and received her rst credit, aCanada/ France coproduction that took her on location to the Rockies. Lovebrought her to Vancouver in the early 80’s. Fantastic timing as the industry wasstill in its inancy stage and the opportunities or learning the crat o costumedesign and growing her resume were excellent.Although” Dr Parnassus” has had the most impact on her career, Monique eelsall projects are interesting. Monique’s other credits include the indie runawayhit ‘Juno’ and the hilariously unny ‘Best in Show’ to name a ew. She loves theprocess, the art o making movies, collaborating with others, telling a storyand composing characters.Some words o advice to aspiring designers: “Take all opportunities as theycome, learn about all aspects o costuming, listen and learn rom the base up,be condent and realize what you don’t know, be open to the collaborativeprocess but don’t become scattered, cultivate yoursel by using all resources:movies, museums, books on all the arts, dierent cultures, history, collect anddraw rom many sources. Most o all be patient.”Recently Monique wrapped up “The Big Year”  a contemporary comedy shoton location in B.C, Florida Keys and NYC, about 3 bird watchers (Luke Owen,Jack Black, Steve Martin) competing in an annual event to spot the rarest birdsin North America.Retiring is not on Monique’s agenda. Still on her lm “to do” list is a periodwestern, set at the end o the 19
th
century. Also she would love to nd her” TimBurton” reerring to Colleen Attwood and Tim Burton’s continued collaborativerelationship.When not making movies, Monique likes to live lie quietly, spending timewith her husband and visiting amily in Montreal, takes drawing classes, likesto cook and have dinner parties and walking by the sea. She has traveled theworld extensively and loves Europe. Paris in particular speaks to her with itsnever ending wealth o all the things that engage and inspire her. I she wereto pack her bags and go somewhere tomorrow, it would be Paris.When Monique became the rst Canadian Costume Designer to receive anOscan nomination it was an extremely proud moment or the entire costumecommunity in Canada. We’re thrilled to have you as a member o CAFTCAD.
BY LOREEN LIGHTFOOT 
“I would row across the ocean for the chance to work with him again” 
STILLS FROM THE IMAGINARIUM OF DR. PARNASSUS

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