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The Inlander - The Newspaper of the Inland Press Association

The Inlander - The Newspaper of the Inland Press Association

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Published by Henry M. Lopez

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Published by: Henry M. Lopez on Dec 31, 2010
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Mailed Monday, Dec. 27, 2010, from Sterling, Ill.Inform post office if it arrives after Jan. 10.
the
Inlander
knowledge for newspapers
 JANUARY 2011 | Vol. 25, No. 1
READY TO HIRE? READ THIS
Remove the barriers to hiring the‘best and the brightest’ with theseproven tips.
PAGE 9
COMPETITION HEATS UP
AOL’s Patch joins the fragmentedmedia landscape in search of localadvertising dollars.
PAGES 12-13
FELLOWSHIP PROGRAM
Why a Wick Communication’s webdeveloper has a strong passion fornewspapers.
PAGE 14
Additional training information on pages17 or visit InlandPress.org. Select “EventRegistration” under the “Training” tab.
Inlandtraining
 Jan. 13 | Webinar
DemystifyingDigital Sales forLegacy Print Teams
This Inland Webinar will help takethe fear factor out of online adprograms for traditional print repswho still feel more confident sell-ing print over digital ads. Topicscovered will include simplifyingthe sales process; comparing andcontrasting the online vs. print au-dience; targeting other media forreal incremental revenues; and de-mystifying online terminology.
WITH SCOTT ROSENBERG, DIGITALMARKETING SPECIALIST,STRATEGY2 DIGITAL, CRYSTAL LAKE, ILL.
 Jan. 26 | Webinar
Write Tighter and Faster
With a little planning and a bit of deconstruction and focus of yourstory idea, you’ll write more effi-ciently. You’ll also learn to usepowerful words and fewer awk-ward transitions in a session thatwill improve your story lengthsand writing speed.
WITH KIM STRONG, DIRECTOR OF BUSINESSDEVELOPMENT AND WRITING COACH, THEPATRIOT-NEWS, HARRISBURG, PA.
“I just wanted to send you aquick note to compliment Inland on a Webinar. It’s almost likebits and pieces of great informa-tion we have received throughmany Inland seminars all cametogether for us through the In-land Webinar, “A Close Exami-nation of the Agency Approach for Sales Force Organization,”with Greg Swanson. Our groupspent another 30 minutes brain-storming after the session and came out with a shared focus for improvement for our sales repsand, most importantly, our cus-tomers. It will take time and alot of work, but our team seemsto be on a common path to real-ize improvement. Thanks for a job well done.” — Jeffrey N. Evans, publisher, Ludington (Mich.) Daily News
Preserving advertising revenue as competition grows
By Michelle Finkler
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
Non-newspaper sales people areapproaching your advertising cli-ents an average of 22 times a month,according to research conducted byITZBelden.“That includes Groupon, LivingSocial, mobile sites, somebody in-side a garage who’s got a cool ideafor your town—all kinds of peo-ple,” said Greg Swanson, presidentof Portland, Ore.-based ITZ Pub-lishing, which conducted the re-search in partnership with BeldenInteractive, also based out of Port-land.“Out of the 22 people who askedto give a pitch, our local retailersare taking about seven of thosecalls,” Swanson said. “What’s go-ing on here is our advertisers arebeing educated about twice a weekabout ways they should advertise,and we’re either helping them fig-ure out what to do on the basis of what they’re hearing or we’renot.”Unlike other studies that surveybusinesses in general, the ITZ-Belden research is based on actualnewspaper contacts. The findingsare based on input from 2,840small- and medium-sized busi-nesses identified as advertisingclients or prospects for the localpaper. The advertisers agreed toparticipate in the study, which wascompleted in September 2010,upon an invitation by 81 newspa-pers in 40 states.Newspaper sales reps who arenot conversant with the variousproducts that are constantly beingpitched to your customers and thewide range of advertising optionsthey have, undermine your abilityto sell solutions to local business“because we look like we’re lim-ited consultants,” Swanson said.Sales reps need to identify all of the different products available intheir markets and understand howthey are being sold, he said.“If we’re not selling keywords insearch, if we’re not selling e-mailpush, if we’re not helping facilitatemap-based advertising, if we’re notselling mobile and video ads, if we’re not selling the things they’rebuying, all we know for sure is thatthis money is going to someoneelse.”According to ITZBelden, 45 per-cent of businesses use three to fiveother mediums to advertise besidesthe print newspaper; 14 percent usetwo other mediums and 15 percentuse six to nine other mediums.What it boils down to is thatnewspapers get almost 30 percentof the local businesses’ total spend-ing. Online, the percentage is evensmaller.“If we ask them how muchthey’re getting in online advertis-ing, it is 13 percent of total spend-ing,” Swanson said. “The maximumwe’ll be getting between our printproduct and online product is some-where around 40 percent of theirspending, or $4 out of $10. Thequestion is, what other products canwe offer to get some of those $6?”
New model
The solution isn’t giving “awhole bunch more stuff for oursales people to sell,” Swanson said.The answer is to restructure yoursales organization to more resemblean agency model, with smart bun-dles based on business category, hesaid. ITZBelden data of businessowners’ interests can serve as a di-rectional aid for newspapers as theydecide what offerings should be in
7%0%10%20%30%40%50%None1 to 45 to 910 to 1415 to 1920 to 2425 to 2930 to 4950 or moreDon’t know/Not sure50%22%9%3%2%2%2%1%3%
Under Siege
In September 2010, ITZ Publishing and Belden Interactive completed a survey of small- and medium-sized businesses inactive correspondence with local newspapers as advertising clients or prospects. This graph shows data in response to thisquestion: “In an average month, with how many advertising sales people do you speak, in person or on the phone, amongthese in-coming efforts?” On average, business owners receive 22 approaches a month and listen to pitches from seven of those approaches a month.
SOURCE: ITZBELDEN | GRAPHIC BY: MICHELLE FINKLER 
Sales pitches from non-newspaper advertising sales people
ADVERTISING: CONTINUED ON PAGE 11
 
PAGE 2
The Inlander | InlandPress.org | JANUARY 2011
VOL. 25, NO. 1 | JANUARY 2011
701 Lee St., Suite 925, Des Plaines, IL 60016 | (847) 795-0380Fax (847) 795-0385 | inland@inlandpress.org | InlandPress.org
INLANDER STAFF
The Inlander is the official publication of the Inland Press Association.It is published 12 times a year. The Inlander is printed by ShawCommunity News Group, Sterling, Ill. Paper supplied by PAGE Co-op,King of Prussia, Pa.DISCLAIMER: Columns and articles do not represent the opinions of Inland Press Association or its members or of the Inland Press Foundation.Submissions from law firms do not constitute legal advice or opinions.They are intended for general information purposes only.
THE INLAND PRESS ASSOCIATION
The Inland Press Association is a not-for-profit organization owned byits members and operated by a volunteer board. Dues are among thelowest in the industry, about $30 per thousand circulation for dailies,$125 flat rate for weeklies. The Inland Press Foundation assists withcontinuing education programs for newspaper employees.
the
Inlander
knowledge for newspapers
The Inlander: (ISSN 1066-2146) is published monthly by the Inland PressAssociation, Inc. Subscription rate for non-members is $75. PeriodicalPostage Paid at Des Plaines, Ill., and additional mailing offices.POSTMASTER: Send address changes toInland Press Association, ATTN: The Inlander,701 Lee St., Suite 925, Des Plaines, IL 60016©2011 The Inland Press Association, Inc. All Rights Reserved.
INLAND EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
News in Brief 
Send items to inland@inlandpress.org 
READERSHIP SURVEY: Seventy-eight percent of readers readmost or all of their communitynewspapers—and of those who go online for local news, 55percent found it on the local newspaper’s website,compared to 17 percent for sites such as Yahoo, MSN orGoogle.
SOURCE: NNAWEB.ORG
78 percent
“The local newspaper and its associated website may notbe perfect when it comes to presenting informationobjectively, but they do represent at least the attempt tounderstand the meaning of the information they publishand to present information in a clear, useful context.”
 Jim Slusher, assistant managing editor for Opinion, DailyHerald, Arlington Heights, Ill., writing about WikiLeaks
     M    e     d     i    a     Q    u    o     t    e     Q    u     i    c     k     S     t    a     t
Brokerage thinks interest inbuying papers is on the rise
A slowly recovering economy, improving ad revenuesand “great values” are beginning to create strong buyer inter-est in newspapers, according to Cribb, Greene & Associates,a newspaper brokerage firm based in Bozeman, Mont.Managing Director John T. Cribb said values are in the3x to 6x trailing the 12-month range of earnings before inter-est, tax, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA). He saidmost sales are seller-financed, but that buyers are more con-fident in their ability to secure bank financing.Buyers want “quality and synergy,” and they’re also look-ing to time a purchase in advance of a strong rebound in theadvertising industry, which would result in greater competitionfrom other buyers, he said. “This is a change that we believeis the beginning of sustainable buyer interest,” Cribb said.
New Century Press acquiresFlatland Publishing in N.D.
New Century Press Inc., headquartered in Rock Rapids,Iowa, has acquired Flatland Publishing Inc., which pub-lishes the
Steele County Press
in Finley, N.D., and the
GriggsCounty Courier 
in Cooperstown, Iowa, as well the com-pany’s advertising specialties division.Jon Flatland, owner and president of Flatland, said thenew owners have extensive experience in specialty publica-tions, particularly those geared toward tourism and eco-nomic development.Julie Bergman of W.B. Grimes & Company in Gaithers-burg, Md., represented Flatland Publishing in the sale.
 Journal Register’s new erafor community journalism
The Yardley, Pa.-based Journal Register Company re-cently opened a new newsroom that’s designed to encourage“the audience we serve to participate in the newsgatheringprocess and to work with our professional journalists to ad-dress the issues facing our communities,” CEO John Patonsaid.Located in Torrington, Conn., the
 Register Citizen
’s news-room has more than 13,000 square feet of open office space,serves coffee and pastries to the public, provides free publicWiFi and public access to more than 120 years of newspaperarchives. In addition, there’s a classroom/meeting space withvideo conferencing capabilities and dedicated space andworkstations for the public—all part of Journal Register’sstrategy to implement a “digital first” business model.RegisterCitizen.com’s training room will be used to trainstaff and bloggers, Paton said. It will also be made availablefor the public for use as a community meeting room. The
 Register Citizen
is also inviting politicians from the stateand federal level to hold office hours at the newsroom toprovide direct access for community members. Office hourswill be livestreamed on RegisterCitizen.com.
ABC partnership enablesaudits of mobile audience
The Schaumburg, Ill.-based Audit Bureau of Circulations’interactive unit, ABCi, is teaming up with Toronto-basedPolar Mobile to provide independently audited mobile usagedata from smartphones, tablets and mobile browsers forpublications in the U.S. and Canada.Audited mobile application usage figures can be reportedon ABCi’s new “m.Audit” report, which tracks mobile audi-ence by device type or operating system, mobile audience byday, audience access points—apps on tablets, smartphones—unique devices and page views by section, and the numberof time readers shared content via e-mail or Twitter.According to a recent ABCi survey, the mobile market isbecoming increasingly important to content providers, withalmost 90 percent of publishers saying their publication waspaying more attention to the mobile market this year thanlast. Seventy-nine percent of larger newspapers are format-ting their sites for mobile devices.
Medill examines how to makehyperlocal sites more relevant
Local journalism sites must know their audience, makerevenue a priority and engage their audience in new waysif they’re to become more relevant in their communities.Those are the three key findings in a study conducted re-cently by 15 graduate students at the Medill School of Jour-nalism in Evanston, Ill.The students focused on audience research, business andadvertising, and technology. They chronicled their work ona class blog, LocalFourth.com, and produced a 72-page re-port documenting their findings and recommendations. Thereport can be accessed at http://bit.ly/Local-Fourth-Final-Report.
MediaNews Group suesto enforce copyright law
MediaNews Group, the parent company of 
The Denver Post 
, is suing Matt Drudge and other bloggers for copyrightinfringement. A suit filed against the Drudge Report allegesthat the site improperly reposted without permission a pho-to that appeared in the Nov. 18, 2010, edition of 
The Post 
.Righthaven LLC, a copyright enforcement company basedin Las Vegas that’s representing MediaNews Group, is re-portedly seeking $150,000 in damages and the revocationof Drudge’s domain names.Righthaven, which is partially owned by a unit of 
 LasVegas Review-Journal
publisher Stephens Media LLC, hasfiled more than 180 copyright infringement suits. The major-ity of suits filed thus far relate to
 Review-Journal
material,but the company began representing MediaNews in Decem-ber 2010.Lawsuits are necessary because simple cease and desistletters aren’t sufficient, according to Righthaven.
Ray Carlsen
ACTING EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR 
inlander1@aol.com
Tracy McMahon
ACCOUNTING MANAGER 
tmcmahon@inlandpress.org
Patricia Slusher
PROGRAM DIRECTOR 
pslusher@inlandpress.org
Elaine M. Lange
ASSISTANT PROGRAM DIRECTOR 
elange@inlandpress.org
Karla Zander
BUSINESS RESEARCH MANAGER HUMAN RESOURCES
kzander@inlandpress.org
Tim Mather
FINANCIAL STUDIES MANAGER 
tmather@inlandpress.org
Adolfo Mendez
PUBLICATIONS EDITOR 
amendez@inlandpress.org
Michelle Finkler
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
mfinkler@inlandpress.org
Kathy Koerlin
ASSISTANT OFFICE MANAGER 
kkoerlin@inlandpress.org
Adolfo Mendez
EDITOR 
Michelle Finkler
ASSOCIATE EDITOR 
Karla Zander
CIRCULATION MANAGER 
Kathy Koerlin
EDITORIAL ASSISTANT
Charles Pittman
CHAIRMAN
Schurz CommunicationsMishawaka, Ind.
Kathleen Ballanfant
ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT
Responsive MediaBellaire, Texas
Rex Rust
ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT-ELECT
Rust CommunicationsCape Girardeau, Mo.
Lloyd Case
ASSOCIATION VICE PRESIDENT
Forum CommunicationsFargo, N.D.
 Julie Inskeep
FOUNDATION PRESIDENT
 Journal GazetteFort Wayne, Ind.
Cheryl Dell
FOUNDATION VICE PRESIDENT
Sacramento BeeSacramento, Calif.
Ray Carlsen
SECRETARY TREASURER 
Inland Acting Executive DirectorDes Plaines, Ill.
 
JANUARY 2011 | InlandPress.org | The Inlander
PAGE 3
Inland News
California
Victor Patton
, crimeand courts reporter, waspromoted to managingeditor of the MercedSun-Star. Patton also is afellow in Inland’s Minor-ity Fellowship Program.
Colorado
Scott Stanford
, adver-tising director at the Pi-lot & Today in Steam-boat Springs, has beennamed general managerin charge of the day-to-day operations of thenewspaper.
Meg Boy-er
, print advertisingmanager, replaces Stanford as adver-tising director.
Georgia
Kevin Riley
, editor-in-chief of the Dayton(Ohio) Daily News, hasbeen named editor-in-chief of the AtlantaJournal Constitution.Riley succeeds
JuliaWallace
, who will be-come senior vice presi-dent of news and pro-graming for Cox MediaGroup’s Ohio proper-ties. The changes takeeffect Jan. 3.
Iowa
Tom Stallbaumer
, pub-lisher of the MorningNews in Springdale,Ark., has been namedpublisher of the AmesTribune and other cen-tral Iowa newspapersrecently purchased byStephens Media fromthe Omaha World-Herald Co.
Kansas
Suzanne Schlicht
, pub-lisher of the Pilot & To-day in SteamboatSprings, Colo., has beennamed chief operatingofficer of The WorldCompany in Lawrence.Schlicht will have responsibilities for allaspects of The World Company’s Law-rence operations.
New Mexico
John Severance
hasbeen named editor at theLos Alamos Monitor.He was most recentlyeditor of the MountainMail in southern NewMexico.
New York
Bob Grady
, editor of the PlattsburghPress-Republican, is retiring at the endof 2010. Grady has been with the news-paper since 1972.
Tennessee
Michael Gardner
hasbeen named director of newspaper circulationfor Athlon Media inNashville. Gardner hadbeen with PublishingGroup of America.
People in the News
Obituaries
A. Cooper Hudnutt
,publisher of 
The Chroni-cle-Telegram
in Elyria,Ohio, died Nov. 23, 2010,at age 57.According to the news-paper, Hudnutt died in hissleep of natural causesdue to a probable cardiaccondition.Hudnutt had served aspublisher since 1991,when he replaced his father, Arthur D. Hudnutt. Healso served as president of the board of Lorain CountyPrinting and Publishing Co., which operates
TheChronicle-Telegram
and various print, radio and onlineproperties, including
The Gazette
, where Hudnutt alsoonce served as publisher.The Hudnutt family has had a long commitment tofamily-owned local journalism in Lorain and surround-ing counties in Ohio. It started in 1927 when A.C.Hudnutt, a then-partner of 
The Chronicle
, became thesole owner of the newspaper. This started the propri-etorship of the Hudnutt family that continues today,the newspaper reported. With the passing of A.C. Hud-nutt and his wife in 1950, the baton of leadership waspassed to Hudnutt’s father Arthur D. Hudnutt.Survivors include Hudnutt’s wife of 34 years, Judith(nee Meister), as well as various other family membersincluding a daughter and son.Hudnutt was preceded in death by his father in2006.
Submit news
Send People in the News itemsto inland@inlandpress.org.
StanfordStallbaumerRileyWallace
TownNews.com offers newapp for Android, iPhone users
TownNews.com, based in Moline, Ill., is offering its news-paper clients a new mobile app compatible with the iPhoneand Android phones. An iPad app is currently in progress,the company said.The new app, available for download in the Apple andAndroid app stores, has been designed to work with BLOX,a TownNews CMS website management system. Featuresinclude just-in-time coupons, photo gallery view, video,citizen journalism and user-generated content, polls and sur-veys, and social media integration—meaning smartphoneowners can share stories or photos via Facebook, Twitterand e-mail.The TownNews app doesn’t require the papers to hireadditional staff or understand complicated computer codeand costs $200 a month, with a small upfront investment,the company said. To help newspapers monetize it, the apphas been developed to work with full-page advertising andpre-roll video ads.TownNews noted that there are 42 million iPhone usersand 38 million Android users and cited a Nielsen forecastindicating half of the U.S. population will carry a smartphoneby the end of 2011. Newspapers with mobile-friendly web-sites should benefit as more people use smartphones to readlocal news, TownNews said.
Inland’s 2011 Mobileand Social NetworkingBoot Camp
March 16-17, 2011 | ChicagoFor more, see page 10
SAVE THEDATE!
Inland’s 2011 Mobile and SocialNetworking Boot Camp will be aday-and-a-half workshop designedto help you understandthe mobile andsocial networkingenvironment and giveyou the informationyou need to develop astrategy for your news operation.

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