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6389-6512

6389-6512

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Published by: ctr4media on Aug 08, 2008
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05/09/2014

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~mm:
tio om as
~merney
tiine-
Sent:
Saturday.
~pnl
5,2006
4.27
PM
To:
Ruff.
Eric.
S3,
OSDSubject:
Re
SO SUPPORT
EricGreat
Thanks
Tom
om,
i attached today's la times story. toward the end the
>
reporter quotes
juniper,
dark
and
keane,
all of
whom
are
very strong
>
about
the
situtation leading up
to
the
war
and
the
interraceion that
>
cook
place, etc. might
be
some
useful info for your oped. thanks.
>
LOB
Anqelç Tines
>
April 15,
2006
>
PO.
1President Cones
To
Defense Of RuwEeld
>
Innusual personal declaration, Bush suggests
Chat
generals might
be
angry
about
milxtary
changes
the
secretary
has
imposed.
>
By Peter Spiegel. Times Staff writer
>
WASHINGTON
-
President Bush gave his forceful and unequivocal backing
>
Friday
to
Defense Secretary Donald
H.
~msfeld. ssuing
a
rare
>
personal statement
to
express
"my
full
support
and
deepest>appreciationq for his
work
in the
war
on terrorism.
>
coving
ta
head off
a
potential political
crisis,
Bush directly
>
addressed recent
criticism
of
Rumsfeld
by
re?ired
senior
generals,
sayin9
^e
had personally witnessed
-
and endorsed
.
the
way
:he
?
"I
have
seen
firsthand how
Don
relies
upon
our military commanders in
>
the field and
at
the
Pentagon to
iuke
deciaiona
about
now
best
to
>
comolece
these
niisaions," Buç maid.
"Secretam
Rumsfeld'a enemetic
>
andsteady leadership is exactly what is
needed
at
this critical period."
>
Bush issued the statement after speaking with Rmsfeld
on
Friday about
3
military operations in
Iraq
and Afghanistan and personally voicing his
a
support. Bush said Rumsfeld had
been
given
the
difficult
job
ofidernizing the military, suggesting
chat
the
process
ofttonay
have
drawn the ire of officers.
>
The
presidential
statement
came
at
the end of
a
week
in which
two
iticed
my
generala who commanded divisions in
~raq,
aj.
en.
~ohn
3
Batiste
and
Ma,.
Gen,
Charles
n.
Swannack
Jr.,
called for Rumsfeld'sresignation,, ccusing him of arrogance and of mismanaging the
war.
>
haa'retired Marine
men.
~nthony
.
zinni, former head of
u.S.
central
a
Command.
>
The mounting criticism of Rumsfeld and recriminations
over
the
war
3
MY
TIMES
 
>
also
come
as
Bush's approval ratings
are
falling and public support
>
for the conflict is declining.
~ven
mong
U.S.
troops
in
Iraq,
72%
favor withdrawal from
Iraq
within
a
year,
and more
than
one
in
four
>
favor an immediate pullout, according
to a
survey released 'in February
>
by mgby International
and
~>e
yne
College in Syracuse.
N.Y.
ftn
administration official said Friday that the white
House
was
>
particularly concerned that the generals'
remarks
could gain
momentum
>
over
a
long holiday weekend in which ~ush, acationing with his family
1
at
Camp David, Md., would
be
out of the limelight.When speculation surfaced recently about another long-rumored Cabinet
>
departure, that
of
Treasury
secretary
John
W.
Snow,
Bueh
was
able
to
f
go before television
cameras
immediately
to
deny it.
>
he
president wanted
to
do this today,.
the
adminiaeration official
>
said ~riday, equesting anonymity while discussing internal White
>
House deliberations.
>
Runrfeld has
been
the aqect ofresignation speculation before After1
i
2004
of
priaoner
abuçe
by
U.S.
wldiera
at
Iraq'm
Abu
Ghraifc
pnso:i
Pumafeld
twice
offered
Buah
hr efllgmation.
9
Democrats pointed out Fridaythat Bush also
offered
a
staunch
defense
>
of
Michael D.
Brown
last year, days before Brown resigned
as
Federal~mergency
ManaqenienC
~gency irector becauae
of
the flawed response toHurricane ~atrii.
>
Many active-duty generala privately agree with public criticism chatRumafeld is disrespectful
to
milicury leader#, current and former
>
senior officers said.
>
~onethçlçm he public çt~tement y retired generala have unsettled
some
officers, who
worry
the
comments
could undermine the morale of
>
Croopa
in
Iraq
and appear
to
challenge civilian control
of
che military.
>A
number
of retired senior officers who worked directly with Rumsfeld
>
also mid in interviews chat they considered the criticim miflguidcd.
>
Although
the
Defense
aecreeary's
aggreaaive style has caused upheaval
1
the
ranks
-
particularly in the Army
-
he ha* changed his views
on
>
several high-profile
issues
because of well-irqued
cases
made by theinifomd leadership, the
officers
said.
,
~umaf~ld's
tough
guy,
nodoubt
about
fit;
ha
can
be prickly," saidAdm.
vem
dark,
who
spent five yearm working with ~mnafeld
s
chief
>
of naval operations before retiring last year,
"You
have
to gain hisrespect, but
once
you gain that, you can work with him.
I
was
thankful
I
had
a
tough guy, because
we
were
in cough times.8'
>
plane and that it
was
thoroughly debated
by
military leaders,
>
Retired
Gen.
John
P.
Jumper,
the
Air
Force
chief
of
inaâ‚ through
the
>
Afghanistan and
Iraq
invasions,
acknowledged
chat
miatakea
were
made
by
failing
to
anticipate the insurgency. But he said allthe military
Â¥
service
chiefs
-
including =en. Eric
K.
Shinseki, then the Army chief
>
of
staff who had
a
public falling-out with Rumafeld
-
were
involved
>
in the discussions and received detailed input from their subordinates.
It
was
Gen.
Franks'
job
to
put together the
war
plan,"
Jumper said in
a
telephone interview.
"of
course
there wasn't
universal agreement.
we
>
hashed things out for hours and hours in the
Tank
Ithe Pentagon's
>
ornate meeting room!.
There
was
a
lot of opportunity
to
discussand
 
>
debate and digest.
>
By
some
accounts, diaagreementa
over
the war plana occasionally
were
>
or
ehement within the officer
ranks
than between military leaders
>
and tumsfeld.
In
h~semoir,
Franks
details neveral run-ins withservice chiefs
over
war
planning for both Afghanistan and
Iraq,
me
of
which included an emletive-laden tirade bv
Franks
aimed
at
two
>
Sow
top
officers involved in
Iraq war
planning
were
less conciliatorytoward Ruinsfeld foe hie handling of the postwar reconstruction period
>
-
particularly the administration's failure to get a civilian
>
authority up and running quickly after saddam Hussein fell.
>
But retired
Gen.
John
Keane,
who
was
Army
vice chief
of
staff duringthe war and
is
still highly regarded by active-duty officers, said theuniformed leaders
fare
ecmallv to blame
tor
not olannina better for
>
the stabilization period.
.
.
-
2
That
judgment was wrong,.
Keane
said in
an
interview.
"We
did not
>
consider
[an
insurgency1 a viable option.
I
believe that's
our
fault.
>
That'a senior military leaderehip buaines!."
>
Although Rumsfeld has
been
criticized
tor
not sending
more
troops to
>
Iraq
once
the regime collapsed,
Keane
aaid the calculation
was
made in
Ã
clone consultation with
Gen.
John
P.
Abizaid,
Pranks' successor as
>
Central Conmand
chief.
>
Keaae
said
he
had
several
convreatians with Abizaid in the autumn
2003
in
which he asked whether
more
troops
were
needed. Abizaid
>
repeatedly argued againat
an
increase,
saying it would only
mean
"more
>
guys walking around the
etreecs
with rifles, net understanding
the
>
culture."
v
"I find it aomewhat insulting for
people
to speculate that Runafeld isaoinehow browbeating the generals
and
they're intimidated into not
>
telling
him
what they believe,"
Keane
said, "The conventional wiadomi they didn't
ask
for
more
troops
because
he 1Runisfeld; wouldn't give
>
it to he. That's insulting
co
the charoctar
of
thoee officere."The
reasons
behind the polarized view of Rmafeld has become the topic
of
intente debate within the uniformed
ranks
in recent
weeks.
Moat
>
retired officers interviewed Friday declined to publicly speculate
on
why views
were
ao
divergent.
>
But
om
currently serving
Army
general who
hae
discussed the
>
relationship between Rumsfeld and the military leadership with severalother
eenior
officers said he believed certain aenerals were simolvbetter suited to dealing with the secretary
on
in
intellectual iivii.
>
generals appointed
by
President clintoi.
.
>
Many
of
those early tensions, which
even Rumsfeld
supporters
>
acknowledge produced intense resentment, largely were set aside afterthe Sept. 11 attacks. But the
current
animosity has been rising
since
Pentaaon civilians sidelined Shineeki after he nubliclv aaid several
>
hundred thousand troops would be
required
to st&iiizeIraq
HY
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