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Carving Stones Into Necklaces Since the Spanish Inquisition Era.

Carving Stones Into Necklaces Since the Spanish Inquisition Era.

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Published by amiljay
This document is about Carving Stones Into Necklaces Since the Spanish Inquisition Era.
This document is about Carving Stones Into Necklaces Since the Spanish Inquisition Era.

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Published by: amiljay on Jan 01, 2011
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Carving Stones Into NecklacesSince the Spanish Inquisition Era.
 The Smithsonian Institution in Washington, DC is home to such a lot that's rare andwonderful in the world. One of the more spectacular collections is the collection of gems in the Museum of Natural History. There you can see glorious crystals and minerals in their natural form, as well assome of the most incredible pieces of jewelry ever made. There are crowns worn byroyalty, giant diamond earrings worn by the cursed French queen Marie-Antoinette.
Carving Stones Into Necklaces Since the Spanish Inquisition Era.
 They're all stunning and amazing, but nothing is more mysterious than the rareearth-green of the emerald. The Smithsonian is home to the most lovely emeraldsever known, and we're incredibly fortunate to have them in this country.One doesn't normally associate beautiful jewelry with the time of the SpanishInquisition. But in the Smithsonian Institution's collection of gems, there is anexquisite necklace holder stand and a necklace badge holder of diamonds andemeralds.It's an impressive double row of diamonds and emeralds ending in a chandelier of emeralds. There is unfortunately little information about the provenance of thisnecklace. The large diamonds and Colombian emeralds were most likely cut in Indiain the 17th century. This would make them one of the earliest examples of cut gemstones in theSmithsonian's Collection. There are really only legends surrounding this necklace. They indicate that it was worn at times by Spanish and French dignitaries.In the early 20th century, it was acquired by the Maharajah of Indore, whose childsold the necklace in'47 to Harry Winston. Winston afterward sold the necklace toMrs. Cora Hubbard Williams of Pittsburgh. She gave it to the Smithsonian in'72.
Carving Stones Into Necklaces Since the Spanish Inquisition Era.
Emeralds are a kind of crystal known as beryls. Beryls are usually clear crystals, butwhen incorporating chromium or vanadium, they attain numerous gradations of green. The purest green is the most rare emeralds and many folks really prefer anemerald which has a blue-green hint.Before the 16th century, the sole known emerald deposits were in Cleopatra'sEgyptian mines. But after emeralds were found in Columbia, those became the goldstandard in emeralds.Colombian emeralds have been discovered by archaeologists among artifacts of such tribes as the Inca, Maya, Aztec, Toltec and the lesser-known Chibcha Indians.Emeralds are among the most rare of gemstones and can be dearer per carat thaneven the best diamonds! Carving Stones Into Necklaces Since the Spanish

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