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Space Shuttle Mission Chronology Vol 3 2005-2009

Space Shuttle Mission Chronology Vol 3 2005-2009

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Published by Bob Andrepont
NASA booklet of Space Shuttle mission summaries, volume 3 of 3
NASA booklet of Space Shuttle mission summaries, volume 3 of 3

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Published by: Bob Andrepont on Jan 01, 2011
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08/17/2012

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National Aeronautics and Space Administration
c h ro n o l o g y
 Volume 3Space Shuttle Missions2005 - 2009
 
2005-2009 Mission Chronology 2 Information Summary
2005
STS-114 
17th Space Station Flight 
Discovery
Pad 39B:
114th shuttle mission31st ight o OV-10350th Caliornia landing
Crew:
Eileen Collins, commander (4th shuttle ight)James Kelly, pilot (2nd)Soichi Noguchi (JAXA), mission specialist (1st)Stephen Robinson, mission specialist (3rd) Andrew Thomas, mission specialist (4th)Wendy Lawrence, mission specialist (4th)Charles Camarda, mission specialist (1st)
Orbiter Preps:
OPF –
 Aug. 22, 2001 (return); Oct. 24, 2001;Jan. 28, 2002; March 8, 2002; April 24, 2002;June 20, 2002; Aug. 22, 2002 (begins OMM);March 29, 2005 (rollover)
 VAB
Sept. 17, 2001 (storage); Nov. 28, 2001(storage); April 17, 2002 (storage); June 14,2002; June 26, 2002; July 2, 2002 (transeraisle); May 26, 2005 (rollback)
Pad A
– April 6, 2005; June 15, 2005 (rollout)
Launch:
July 26, 2005, at 10:39 a.m. EDT.
 A liquid hy-drogen tank low-level uel cut-o sensor ailed a rou-tine prelaunch check during the launch countdownJuly 13, causing mission managers to scrub Discov-ery’s frst launch attempt. Members o an engineeringteam met to review data and possible troubleshootingplans. Some o the troubleshooting included con-ducting electromagnetic intererence and ground re-sistance testing on wiring in the at engine compart-ment. On July 26, the countdown was awless andlito occurred on time.
Landing:
 Aug. 9, 2006, at 8:11:22 a.m. EDT.
Landed
 
onRunway 22, Edwards Air Force Base, Cali. Maingear touchdown: 8:11:36 a.m. Nose gear touch-down: 8:11:41 a.m. Wheel stop: 8:12:36 a.m. Rolloutdistance: 1.5 miles. Mission duration: 13 days, 21hours, 32 minutes and 48 seconds. Landed on orbit219. Logged 5.8 million miles. Waived o 2 land-ing opportunities on Aug. 9 at KSC due to weather.Landed on frst opportunity at EAFB, marking the 6thnight landing at Edwards and the 50th Shuttle landingin Caliornia. Kennedy Space Center was beset withweather issues starting Aug. 7, the original landingdate. Several landing opportunities at Kennedy werewaived o Aug. 8 and again Aug. 9. Edwards waschosen as the preerred landing site.
Mission Highlights:
Discovery’s climb to orbit was extensively docu-mented through a system o new and upgradedground-based cameras, radar systems and airbornecameras aboard high altitude aircrat. The imagerycaptured o Discovery’s launch, and additional im-agery rom laser systems on Discovery’s new orbiterboom sensor system, or OBSS, laser-scanner aswell as data rom sensors embedded in the shuttle’swings, helped mission managers determine the healtho Discovery’s thermal protection system.When Discovery neared the station early Thurs-day morning, Krikalev and Phillips used digital cam-eras and high-powered 800-mm and 400-mm lensesto photograph Discovery’s thermal protective tilesand key areas around its main and nose landing geardoors. All imagery was downlinked to a team o 200to analyze.Beore docking with the space station, Com-mander Eileen Collins perormed the frst rendezvouspitch maneuver about 600 eet below the station. Themotion ipped the shuttle end over end at 3/4 degreeper second, allowing Expedition 11 crew members tophotograph the underside o Discovery and its heat-resistant tiles in detail.Imagery during launch showed a piece o oambeing shed rom the external tank, as well as smallertile and oam dings. Imagery o the tiles showed twoareas where gap fllers were protruding.Mission managers spent several days to deter-mine i any action would be required o the crew.They fnally decided to allow Robinson attempt to pullout the protruding gap fllers with his hand or with or-ceps, or remove the protrusions with a hacksaw. Theastronauts reviewed training or using the robotic armand worked on assembling a hacksaw should theyneed it. A pued-out piece o thermal blanket near thecockpit was identifed in the imagery and became an-other area o concern. Tunnel tests at NASA’s AmersResearch Center in Caliornia and urther engineering
 
analysis showed there was little reason to be con-cerned about debris release during re-entry.Prior to the frst spacewalk, Mission SpecialistWendy Lawrence and Pilot James Kelly guided thestation’s robotic arm, Canadarm2, to lit the multi-purpose logistics module, or MPLM, Raaello romDiscovery’s cargo bay or attachment to the Unitymodule. More inspection o Discovery was conductedby Mission Specialist Charles Camarda and Kelly.During the mission, astronauts tested and exam-ined tiles in demonstration o repair techniques.Other time was spent transerring equipmentand supplies on the Station as well as removing andstowing the same on the MPLM Raaello or return toEarth.Three spacewalks were planned and conducted,including an add-on task or the gap fller removal:
EVA No. 1 — July 30: 6 hours, 50 minutes.
Mission Specialists Stephen Robinson andSoichi Noguchi worked with tiles and reinorcedcarbon-carbon intentionally damaged on theground and brought into space in Discovery’scargo bay. They tested an emittance wash ap-plicator or tile repair and non-oxide adhesive ex-perimental or the reinorced carbon-carbon sam-ples. They also installed a base and cabling or astowage platorm and rerouted power to controlmoment gyroscope-2, or CMG, one o our 600-pound gyroscopes that control the orientation othe station in orbit.
EVA No. 2 — Aug. 1: 7 hours, 14 minutes.
Noguchi and Robinson removed the ailedCMG-1 and stowed it. They moved the new CMGrom the payload bay and installed it. Four unc-tioning CMGs now serve the space station.
EVA No. 3 — Aug. 3: 6 hours, 1 minute.
Attached to the Canadarm2, Robinson wasmoved to the site on Discovery’s underside wherehe gently pulled the two protruding gap fllersrom between thermal protection tiles. Otherevents were installing an external stowage plat-orm outside the station to house spare partsand installing a fth Materials International SpaceStation Experiment (MISSE). MISSE 5 exposessamples o various materials to the harsh spaceenvironment or several months.Mission managers added one more day to themission, to ollow the third spacewalk. Both the Dis-covery crew and Expedition 11 crew paid tribute tothe Columbia crew and other astronauts and cosmo-nauts who have lost their lives in the human explora-tion o space.The MPLM was unberthed rom the Unity nodeusing the robotic arm and placed back in Discovery’scargo bay. Discovery and the MPLM carried 7,055pounds o unneeded equipment and trash. Both theCanadarm2 and OBSS were restored to their loca-tions in the cargo bay.
2005-2009 Mission Chronology 3 Information Summary
2006
STS-121
18th Space Station Flight 
Discovery
Pad 39B:
115th shuttle mission32nd ight o OV-10362nd KSC landing
Crew:
Steven Lindsey, commander (4th shuttle ight)Mark Kelly, pilot (2nd)Piers Sellers, mission specialist (2nd)Michael Fossum, mission specialist (1st)Lisa Nowak, mission specialist (1st)Stephanie Wilson, mission specialist (1st)Thomas Reiter, mission specialist (1st),representing the European Space Agency(ESA)
Orbiter Preps:
OPF
Aug. 22, 2005 (return)
 VAB
May 12, 2006 (rollover)
Pad B
– May 19, 2006 (rollout)
Launch:
July 4, 2006, at 2:38 p.m. EDT.
Launch oDiscovery was scrubbed twice, July 1 and 2, dueto weather concerns. Ater a day’s standdown, thelaunch attempt resumed on July 4 and lito occurredon time.
Landing:
July 17, 2006, at 9:15 a.m. EDT.
Landed onRunway 15 at KSC.
 
Main gear touchdown: 9:14:43a.m. Nose gear touchdown: 9:14:53 a.m. Wheel stop:

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