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Published by callura

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Published by: callura on Jan 03, 2011
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01/03/2011

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Chapter 6:
 
 Segmental change: an outline of some of the most common phonological processes
CHAPTER 6
SEGMENTAL CHANGE:AN OUTLINE OF SOMEOF THE MOST COMMONPHONOLOGICAL PROCESSES
 
6.1. Sounds in connected speech. Coarticulation
We have so far described various sounds, we analyzed and classified consonants,vowels and other classes and subclasses of sounds. We even talked about functionalclasses of sounds that we labeled phonemes and further decomposed into distinctivefeatures. We have, nevertheless, spoken only about individual sounds. When we talkedabout groups or classes of sounds we actually operated various generalizations extendingthe features of a particular sound to a hypothetical superordinate category. This meansthat our analysis only dealt with isolated sounds, sounds that we picked up as we do witha beetle that we keep in an insectarium, and we examine hoping to draw from itsindividual characteristics conclusions about the traits of its entire family or species.However, this is not how speech works. We saw from the very beginning of this book that speech is a dynamic process and that when human beings talk they do not utter eachand every sound separately, but deliver a continuous flow of sounds that are actuallyoften difficult to distinguish for an ear that is not accustomed to the phonology of therespective language. It was actually one of our first examples of the different concerns of  phonetics and phonology, as it was clear that when we listen to an unknown idiom our mind cannot understand what the ear perceives, which in fact demonstrates that,mentally, we operate with classes of sounds (the phonemes we described earlier)

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