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Global Health Affairs - Syllabus

Global Health Affairs - Syllabus

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Published by Randall Kuhn
This course offers an entry point to Global Health from a social science perspective. The history of global health action is littered with failure and disillusionment, due to a lack of theoretical or empirical rigor and serious intentions. Success begins with identifying salient interventions to problems of consequence, a surprisingly rare achievement. Even sensible interventions can fail without an understanding of other aspects of human development that affect health directly, that determine programmatic success or failure, and that are themselves impacted by health.
This course offers an entry point to Global Health from a social science perspective. The history of global health action is littered with failure and disillusionment, due to a lack of theoretical or empirical rigor and serious intentions. Success begins with identifying salient interventions to problems of consequence, a surprisingly rare achievement. Even sensible interventions can fail without an understanding of other aspects of human development that affect health directly, that determine programmatic success or failure, and that are themselves impacted by health.

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Published by: Randall Kuhn on Jan 04, 2011
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GLOBAL HEALTH AFFAIRS: THEORY AND PRACTICE
INTS 4367
 SPRING 2015 CLASS
WEDNESDAY 9-12, STURM HALL 235
BLACKBOARD
INSTRUCTOR
RANDALL KUHN / rkuhn@du.edu / 303.871.2061 / BCH 208D
OFFICE HOURS
TUESDAY/WEDNESDAY 12-3PM
Objectives and Overview
This course offers an entry point to Global Health from a social science perspective. The history of global health action is littered with failure and disillusionment, due to a lack of theoretical or empirical rigor and serious intentions. Success begins with identifying salient interventions to problems of consequence, a surprisingly rare achievement. Even sensible interventions can fail without an understanding of other aspects of human development that affect health directly, that determine programmatic success or failure, and that are themselves impacted by health. In the opening weeks we will explore and apply frameworks for global health analysis, intervention, and evaluation. Having addressed the surprisingly daunting task of designing effective interventions, we spend the final four weeks dissecting the forces of global trade, security, and politics that further impede the path from good ideas to global change. Our goals are three-fold: to engage in major debates regarding the where, how and why of health interventions; to critique diverse frameworks for understanding and methods for addressing issues in global health; to develop an intervention/research project embedded within  broader concerns of global health.
Grading
Research proposal
 (70%): You will propose, design, and justify an internship or project aimed at improving the quality of a health service or addressing a health problem. This should be work you could undertake in the next year. Details of proposal will be provided under a separate handout. Progress will be monitored and your work evaluated throughout the quarter:
 
1-2 page partner overview due April 8 (10% of your grade)
 
2-3 page overview of global health problem due April 22 (10%)
 
Detailed scientific review of intervention background due May 6 (10%)
 
Outline draft due May 20 (10%)
 
Final proposal due June 1 at 5pm (30% of your grade) Any citations and references used in the homework assignments or final paper must follow the American Psychological Association (APA) style guide (visit http://www.apastyle.org/ or
 
 2 http://duwriting.org/writing-center/services). The DU Writing Center is an excellent resource. For further information, or to schedule an appointment, see http://duwriting.org/writing-center
Discussion Leader (20%):
 Each student must co-lead a case study discussion or debate. Case studies relate to specific high-profile interventions. Leaders should present a well-organized talk oriented around identifying the burden, risk factors, intervention, contextual issues, and success. Talks should clearly connect the theoretical and practical aspects of the intervention. They should cumulatively build on earlier course readings. Leaders should frame questions for further class discussion. Presentations will be graded on relevance, substance, and creativity. In the case of debates, you will also be graded on persuasiveness.
Participation
(10%): I will track participation on the basis of class discussion, a small number of quick response writing exercises, and attendance at research seminars. We will have seminars after class for several weeks. Speak to me in office hours or by email if you have any concerns about in-class discussion or attendance at seminars.
 All readings are available through Canvas.
March 25: The Challenge of Global Health
Global Public Health
 , 4(1): 50-68 Dybul, Mark, Peter Piot, and Julio Frenk. 2012. Reshaping Global Health. 
Policy Review
173, Hoover Institution, Stanford University, 13 pages. Fidler, David P. 2011. Rise and Fall of Global Health as a Foreign Policy Issue. 
Global Health Governance
IV(2), Special Issue: The Intersection of Health and Security , 6 pages. Taplin, Dana H. and Heléne Clark. 2012. Theory of Change Basics: A Primer on Theory of Change. ActKnowledge: Theory to Results, 9 pages.
April 1: Health measurement and priority-setting
Daedalus
137(1): 36-48. Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. The Global Burden of Disease: Generating Evidence, Guiding Policy. Seattle, WA: IHME, 2013, pp. 1-30. Stuckler, David and Martin McKee. 2008. Five metaphors about global-health policy. 
The Lancet
372: 95-97. Black, Robert E, Saul S Morris, Jennifer Bryce. 2003. Where and why are 10 million children dying every year? 
The Lancet
 361(9376): 2226-2234.
 
 3
 After class, there will be a talk by Mohammed Shaheen, Associate Professor and former Dean, School of Public Health, al-Quds University, will speak about research on the impact of the Israel-Palestinian conflict on health
April 8: Health transitions and structural drivers
1-2 page overview of partner organization due today
Kunitz, Stephen J. 1987. Explanations and Ideologies of Mortality Patterns. Population and Development Review 13(3): 379-408. Kuhn, Randall. 2010. Routes to Low Mortality in Poor Countries Revisited. 
Population and Development Review
36(4): 655-692. Weiss, Robin A. and Anthony J. McMichael. 2004. Social and environmental risk factors in the emergence of infectious diseases. 
Nature Medicine
 10: S70
S76. Sparrow, Annie. 2014. Syria: The Other Threat. 
New York Review of Books
 August 12, 2014. Some of you may wish to read 
. 
April 15: Proximate risk factors and interventions
Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation. The Global Burden of Disease: Generating Evidence, Guiding Policy. Seattle, WA: IHME, 2013, pp. 31-43.  Jones, Gareth. 2003. How many child deaths can we prevent this year? 
The Lancet
362: 65-71. Smith, Kirk R. 1995. Environmental Hazards During Economic Development: the Risk Transition and Overlap. In E.G. Reichard & G.A. Zapponi,
 Assessing and Managing Health Risks  from Drinking Water Contamination
 , IAHS, Wallingford, UK, 3-13. Mosley, W. Henry and Lincoln C. Chen. 1984. An Analytical Framework for the Study of Child Survival in Developing Countries. 
Population and Development Review
10: 25-45.
April 22: Intervention design and Theory of Change
2-3 page overview of health problem due today
Filmer, Deon , Jeffrey S. Hammer, and Lant H. Pritchett. 2000. Weak Links in the Chain: A Prescription for Health Policy in Poor Countries. 
World Bank Research Observer
 17(1): 47
66. Campbell, Oona M R, Wendy J Graham. 2006. Strategies for reducing maternal mortality: getting on with what works. 
The Lancet
368(9543): 1284-1299. Taplin, Dana H., Heléne Clark, Eion Collins, and David C. Colby. 2013. Theory of Change Technical Papers. ActKnowledge: Theory to Results, 23 pages. Maru, Duncan. 2012. 
of Change. Nyaya Health Blog. January 27, 2012, 2 pages.

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