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Global Health Affairs - Syllabus

Global Health Affairs - Syllabus

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Published by Randall Kuhn
This course offers an entry point to the field of Global Health Affairs from a social science and international relations perspective. Its main goal is to explore and apply theoretically-grounded frameworks for understanding global health priorities, for designing local and national health interventions, and for understanding the impact of health programs on a range of long- and short-term outcomes. In the first half of the course we will explore the determinants and impacts of health, working our way from the conceptual to the empirical, and from the macro to the micro. In the second half, we will address a broad terrain of interventions, working our way back up from the traditional disease control approach to more recent efforts in health systems, security, trade reform, and governance.
This course offers an entry point to the field of Global Health Affairs from a social science and international relations perspective. Its main goal is to explore and apply theoretically-grounded frameworks for understanding global health priorities, for designing local and national health interventions, and for understanding the impact of health programs on a range of long- and short-term outcomes. In the first half of the course we will explore the determinants and impacts of health, working our way from the conceptual to the empirical, and from the macro to the micro. In the second half, we will address a broad terrain of interventions, working our way back up from the traditional disease control approach to more recent efforts in health systems, security, trade reform, and governance.

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Published by: Randall Kuhn on Jan 04, 2011
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GLOBAL HEALTH AFFAIRS: THEORY AND PRACTICE
INTS 4367
AUTUMN 2010CLASS
THURSDAY 9-12, BCH 220
BLACKBOARD
http://blackboard.du.edu/webapps/blackboard/execute/courseMain?course_id=_141328_1
 
INSTRUCTOR
RANDALL KUHN / rkuhn@du.edu / 303.871.2061 / BCH 208D
OFFICE HOURS
TUESDAY / THURSDAY 12-2 OR BY APPOINTMENT
Objectives and Overview
This course offers an entry point to the field of Global Health Affairs from a social science andinternational relations perspective. Its main goal is to explore and apply theoretically-groundedframeworks for understanding global health priorities, for designing local and national healthinterventions, and for understanding the impact of health programs on a range of long- andshort-term outcomes. In the first half of the course we will explore the determinants andimpacts of health, working our way from the conceptual to the empirical, and from the macro tothe micro. In the second half, we will address a broad terrain of interventions, working our way back up from the traditional disease control approach to more recent efforts in health systems,security, trade reform, and governance.Each of you must work individually and with the group to build and refine our
own “theory ofchange” for
assessing and addressing health issues across a wide range of contexts. The ToCapproach emphasizes assumptions, and not merely the grand assumptions that give us theaudacity to pursue change in the first place. More important is mapping your programmaticassumptions, the specific intermediate impacts that will be necessary for you to achieve yourgoals. You will explore others' theory of change in case study discussions and build your own by designing a service-based research proposal that could be carried out in the near future.
Grading
 
Research proposal (80%):
You will propose, design, and justify a service-based research projectthat you could actually undertake in the next year or so. It is hoped that this proposal will giveyou a head start on your summer internship plans, a template for subsequent knowledgeacquisition, and an opportunity to undertake the kind of research that lies at the heart of truechange. Successful completion of the assignment will require the following1) identify a specific program, project, or agency addressing a global health challenge2) provide scientific background on significance, causes, and solutions to the challenge3) describe geographic, social, political, or cultural context and assumptions of project4) use background and context to synthesize uncertainties in project that require research5) outline research questions and methods in as much detail as possible6) identify clear goals for how the project could benefit global health science, the servedpopulation, the service agency, your personal development, and your community at GSIS
 
 2We will talk about possible topics in Week 1, in class discussion, and in office hours. For ideason how to formulate your project, visit http://www.theoryofchange.org/. 
You must schedule a half-hour appointment to talk about your project in the first two weeks.
Your progress will be monitored and your work evaluated throughout the quarter:
 
Two-page project summary/overview due on October 21 (15% of your grade)
 
Preliminary draft proposal due on November 11 (15% of your grade)
 
Final paper due November 22 at 5pm (50% of your grade)
Participation and Discussion Leader (20%):
Each student must co-lead a case study discussionand participate in class discussions, visiting lectures, etc. Case studies relate to specific, high-profile interventions. Leaders will present a well-organized talk o
riented around a “Theory ofChange” mapping exercise for the intervention in question.
Talks should clearly address thetheoretical basis for the intervention, alternative approaches to the same issue, and ideologicalor theoretical controversies surrounding the approach. They should relate to earlier coursereadings. Leaders should frame a set of questions for further class discussion. Presentations will be graded on relevance, substance, and creativity. They should last around 15 minutes.I will track participation on the basis of class discussion and a small number of quick responsewriting exercises. These will relate to basic facts of the case study and to its theory of change.Speak to me in office hours or by email if you have any concerns about in-class discussion.
Course Materials
The one book we will use is our forthcoming Global Health Futures volume, a joint effort of theFrederick S. Pardee Center for International Futures and Global Health Affairs.Hughes, Barry B, Randall Kuhn, Cecilia Mosca Peterson, Dale S. Rothman, José RobertoSolórzano. 2010. 
. Forthcoming, Paradigm Press and Oxford University Press.Electronic readings are available through direct WWW links from the on-line syllabus(you must be on the Virtual Private Network), through standard literature search, or from me.
If youbring your thumb drive to the first class I will give you a soft copy of every reading.
 
September 16: The Challenge of Global Health
Hughes et al. Chapter 1: Introduction, 1-8.Benatar, Solomon R. 2005. Moral imagination: the missing component in global health. 
PublicLibrary of Science: Medicine
2: 1207-1210.Garrett, Laurie. 2007. The Challenge of Global Health. 
Foreign Affairs
86(1):
 
14-38.
 
 3
September 23: Concepts, Measurement, and Significance of Health
Hughes et al. Chapter 2: Understanding Health: Concepts, Relationships, and Dynamics, 9-16.McMichael, Anthony J, Martin McKee, Vladimir Shkolnikov, Tapani Valkonen. 2004. MortalityTrends and Setbacks: Global Convergence
Lancet
Review of International Political Economy
The Economic Journal
108(446): 1-25.Braveman, Paula and Sofia Gruskin. 2001. Poverty, equity, human rights and Health. 
Bulletin of the World Health Organization
81(7): 539-545.
If you are not familiar with basis health indicators you may want to look at World Health Report. 2006. Annex Table 1: Basic Indicators for All Members States. 
September 30: Broader Health Determinants and Trajectories
Hughes et al. Chapter 2: Understanding Health: Concepts, Relationships, and Dynamics, 16-28.Kuhn, Randall. 2010. Routes to Low Mortality in Poor Countries Revisited. Manuscript.Brundtland, Gro Harlem.
2004.
.
Whitehead Journal of Diplomacyand International Relations
Emerging InfectiousDiseases
2(4): 259-269.
Further reading: Chapters 3 and 4 of Hughes, et al. for distal driver forecasts; Stephen Kunitz's 1987Explanations and Ideologies of Mortality Patterns  for philosophical basis of the diseases v. systems debate.
October 7: Proximate Determinants of Health
Black, Robert E, Saul S Morris, Jennifer Bryce. 2003. Where and why are 10 million childrendying every year? 
The Lancet
361(9376): 2226-2234.Smith, Kirk R. 1995. Environmental Hazards During Economic Development: the RiskTransition and Overlap.In E.G. Reichard & G.A. Zapponi,
 Assessing and Managing Health Risks from Drinking Water Contamination
 , IAHS, Wallingford, UK, 3-13.Mosley, W. Henry and Lincoln C. Chen. 1984. An Analytical Framework for the Study of ChildSurvival in Developing Countries. 
Population and Development Review
10: 25-45.ActKnowledge and Aspen Roundtable. Theory of Change.See www.theoryofchange.org.Read all sub-
sections under “Toc Background” and “ToC Process”.
 
Further reading: Chapters 5 and 6 of Hughes, et al. to see the proximate driver forecasts and impacts.

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