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Phil Grout art exhibition ends at Birdie's Cafe Gallery in Westminster Maryland

Phil Grout art exhibition ends at Birdie's Cafe Gallery in Westminster Maryland

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Published by Kevin Earl Dayhoff
Phil Grout art exhibition ends at Birdie's Cafe Gallery in Westminster Maryland

By Kevin Dayhoff

January 4, 2011

Phil Grout’s exhibition at Birdie's Cafe Gallery in Westminster ended on January 2, 2011 after a well-received two-month showing.

Grout, an award-winning photojournalist, fine art photographer appeared for the opening of a retrospective show of his work on November 5, 2010 at Birdie's Café 233 East Main Street, Westminster, MD 21157 - http://www.birdiescoffee.com/

The show titled “44/40,” spanned over four decades of Grout’s work, from Vietnam to Africa, Plains Georgia, to Carroll County; and includes almost 70 pieces of work. (See also: http://www.scribd.com/doc/41131999/Phil-Grout-award-winning-photojournalist-to-appear-at-Birdie%E2%80%99s-Cafe-Gallery-in-Westminster)

An article about Grout’s critically acclaimed show appeared in the Carroll Eagle on November 7, 2010. The article may be found at: http://www.explorecarroll.com/community/4918/photojournalist-phil-grout-shows-decades-work-birdies-caf/

At that time, Sherri Hosfeld Joseph, the owner of Birdie’s and an artist herself, added, “Phil Grout is one of the greatest photojournalists of his generation. We are truly blessed as a community that he has chosen our stories to document. Phil has an amazing ability to find the extraordinary in everyday life - and this show, a retrospective of forty-four years of his work, will leave you awestruck.”

On November 6th, 2010, Grout published the following notes and anecdotes about his show, the art exhibited and his four-decade journey as an artist: “Phil Grout 44/40 in Light.”

An extensive collection of Phil's work can be viewed at www.philgrout.com

See also: http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/2010/11/phil-grout-award-winning.html

For additional information: “Birdie's Cafe; has Westminster's Main Street percolating once again - New cafe opens in place of former Pour House,” By Kevin Dayhoff Posted 8/08/10 http://t.co/aZ8XWbe

Phil Grout, photographer, Vietnam, veteran, Birdie’s Cage, art, culture, Carroll County, Westminster, Maryland, photojournalist, Dayhoff

LABELS: Art Artists, Art Artists Grout Phil, Art Off Track Art, People Joseph Sherri Hosfeld, Photography, Westminster Art Culture Artists, Westminster Bus Birdies's

[20110104 Grout art show ends at Birdie's Cafe Gallery] [20101106 Phil Grout Bio With 44-40 Notes Short]
Phil Grout art exhibition ends at Birdie's Cafe Gallery in Westminster Maryland

By Kevin Dayhoff

January 4, 2011

Phil Grout’s exhibition at Birdie's Cafe Gallery in Westminster ended on January 2, 2011 after a well-received two-month showing.

Grout, an award-winning photojournalist, fine art photographer appeared for the opening of a retrospective show of his work on November 5, 2010 at Birdie's Café 233 East Main Street, Westminster, MD 21157 - http://www.birdiescoffee.com/

The show titled “44/40,” spanned over four decades of Grout’s work, from Vietnam to Africa, Plains Georgia, to Carroll County; and includes almost 70 pieces of work. (See also: http://www.scribd.com/doc/41131999/Phil-Grout-award-winning-photojournalist-to-appear-at-Birdie%E2%80%99s-Cafe-Gallery-in-Westminster)

An article about Grout’s critically acclaimed show appeared in the Carroll Eagle on November 7, 2010. The article may be found at: http://www.explorecarroll.com/community/4918/photojournalist-phil-grout-shows-decades-work-birdies-caf/

At that time, Sherri Hosfeld Joseph, the owner of Birdie’s and an artist herself, added, “Phil Grout is one of the greatest photojournalists of his generation. We are truly blessed as a community that he has chosen our stories to document. Phil has an amazing ability to find the extraordinary in everyday life - and this show, a retrospective of forty-four years of his work, will leave you awestruck.”

On November 6th, 2010, Grout published the following notes and anecdotes about his show, the art exhibited and his four-decade journey as an artist: “Phil Grout 44/40 in Light.”

An extensive collection of Phil's work can be viewed at www.philgrout.com

See also: http://kevindayhoffart.blogspot.com/2010/11/phil-grout-award-winning.html

For additional information: “Birdie's Cafe; has Westminster's Main Street percolating once again - New cafe opens in place of former Pour House,” By Kevin Dayhoff Posted 8/08/10 http://t.co/aZ8XWbe

Phil Grout, photographer, Vietnam, veteran, Birdie’s Cage, art, culture, Carroll County, Westminster, Maryland, photojournalist, Dayhoff

LABELS: Art Artists, Art Artists Grout Phil, Art Off Track Art, People Joseph Sherri Hosfeld, Photography, Westminster Art Culture Artists, Westminster Bus Birdies's

[20110104 Grout art show ends at Birdie's Cafe Gallery] [20101106 Phil Grout Bio With 44-40 Notes Short]

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Published by: Kevin Earl Dayhoff on Jan 05, 2011
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I always thought I wanted to be a doctor like my father. But after five unsuccess-ful majors, the Dean at Denison University suggested I try something other thanacademic studies. I enlisted in the Navy. I was1A in 1966, and Vietnam wascoming into view. I thought it would be best to see 'Nam from the water instead of the land. During a boot camp interview, the personnelman broke it to me that I got a 17 out of 100 on my mechanical test."There's no way in hell we're going to let you on a submarine as you requested," he said. "You'll sink thedamn thing." And then he talked about public relations and the shortage of journalists. I thought fastand said, "Well, I've been a reporter for two years." (I'd never written a news story in my life). He boughtmy story and pronounced me a "journalist." Two months later I was pushed off the end of the pier andfound myself on the Gulf of Tonkin off the coast of Vietnam conducting my first interview as a "journal-ist". I was packing an Instamatic camera around my neck. With help from an officer who had one jour-nalism course in college, I got the story out. It was quite a thrill to see my first news story in
 Pacific Stars and Stripes 
on Paul Nitze, the Secretary of the Navy, who had just crossed paths with some tinhorn Navyreporter whose only writing experience was penning several soppy poems in college. When I look back the path stretching 44 years, I give thanks for the little lie that got my foot in the journalism door (andmore than once in my mouth). It's been a twisting trail filled with light. I quickly learned it wasn’t theimages of war I was hunting, but more the face of humanity.It was a Sunday morning in November 1966. Usually I'd be out with Dean Minnich, my first photomentor. But this day I was on a photo "hunt" by myself working some back alleys in Sasebo, Japanwhen one of those "ah ha!" moments popped up in front of my camera. Three elderly gentlemen wereenjoying their cigarettes
 
and conversation as they sat on a park bench.
(1.)
I knew thenthat I wanted to be behind a camera for the rest of my life. I wanted to be a photojour-nalist. And it was Dean who asked me to come to Carroll County in 1970 to work atthe Hanover Sun in Westminster as a photographer and reporter. That was 40 yearsago.What kept me here were the country folks like Charlie Shriver who used his team of Percheron draft horses to farm his Wakefield Valley Farm. His fellas,
(2.)
like Peteand Jake and others, were kin to Charlie, and I can still see my friend hitching up histeam, looking out to the west to that first field he was going to hit. I was drawn to old John and Irene Wolf and their stories about the past and his lovefor old farm tools. The three of us became friends. I needed a Thanksgivingillustration. They had much to be thankful for 
(3.)
and were glad to ablige.While scouting photos near Gamber, I walked back a farm lane towardan interesting looking barn. And from one of the sheds came a sight thatsuggested I was watching an old soldier return from the Crimean War. It was old CarrollNiner 
(4.)
in his torn poncho carrying one of his hens.The police dispatcher said some kids were "in a clothes dryer" at thelaundromat. Sure enough there was a kid in one of the dryers. He hadn't spotted mycamera, and I just waited quietly for the action to unfold. Just as the officer openedthe dryer door, out I popped and grabbed the shot
(5.)
that got me a first place featurephoto with the Maryland-Delaware-D.C. Press Association.
44/40 in Light 
Phil Grout
 
I was late to a barn fire once. By the time I got there, the barn was down and smoldering, butI'll never forget that farmer doing what he could by taking a hominy
(6.)
can fullof water and tossing it on the remains of his barn.January 20, 2009, will always stick in my memory when I was part of a crowdthat gathered on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial to hear (not see) Barrack Obama getsworn in as our new president. And there beside me was a woman who traveled fromNorth Carolina with her young daughter, to witness the historic ceremony
(7.)
 A disraught young man had a fight with his girlfriend and had barricaded himself inhis mother's home with quite an arsenal of weapons. The shooting was sporatic, butlasted on into the night. I knew I was probably going to have only one shot
.(8.)
I gotit, moments before a state trooper held a shot gun on me for what seemed like an eter-nity before Chief of Police Sam Leppo rescued me.It was Veterans Day 1985 at the Vietnam Veterans' Memorial when a handful of usVietnam vets rode down to D.C. for the occasion. I remember clearly Bernie Masino and Iwalking along The Wall seeing a small crowd headed our way. There was a gray haired manin front. "Bernie," I said, "it's Westmoreland". General William Westmoreland scanned thewall and stooped to get a closer look. He found what he was after—the name of hisnephew, etched forever in black granite.
(9.)
The fire/police scanner announced there was a house fire with two infants trapped in UnionMills, about eight miles away. Weeks later I saw the Fire Marshall's report. The youngmother had wanted to find a new home for her husband and babies. She was tired of shar-ing the home with her in-laws. So she started a small fire in the rear laundry room and wentout front to get the mail. She figured there would just be a little fire and some smoke whichwould force her and her family to find a new home of their own. But the fire spread quickly.Her babies were trapped in a front room. They both died of smoke inhilation. And when the first babywas brought out, I can still hear the screams—still see the outstreched hand— 
(10.)
from a mother whowas too late.In 1991 I had a happy accident in my photo lab. I invented a technique of convertingthe silver embedded in the emulsion coating of photographic paper to another form of silver which would leave a florescent, multi-colored trail across the image. I call a
 photoglyph
or lightetching.
 Dawn Dancer 
 
(11.)
 
is one of the best examples.Dad was always my champion. His favorite image of mine was the portrait of Sister Helen
(12.)
at St. John's Church in Westminster. This same framed print hung in aspecial place beside my father in his office for many years. It's a priceless possession.Speaking of Dad, how about Herb "Daddy" Sell hittin' those hot lickson his keyboard. For decades Herb was the choral music director atWestminster High School. By moonlight, and now daylight after hisretirement, he's taking his jazz sound around the southern Pennsylvanianorthern Maryland circuit. He and the fellas were warming up thecrowd in this shot
(14.)
during a recent Westminster Flower and Jazz Festival. "Daddy" andhis combo almost brought down our little log house for a party when I turned 40.
-2-
 
Mary Garrison could have been the poster girl for the Maryland Milk Producers, AARPor even the American Rodeo Association. That's what I've told folks more than once—thatMary was the 1982 grand champion senior "bulldogger" at the Carroll County Senior Rodeo.She really just loved her cows. I met her in 1982 when I was trolling for photos at the CarrollCounty 4-H/FFA Fair.
(15.)
We need more Mary Garrisons. She's become the poster girl for my journey. I can't remember how she acquired the name "Howard," but that's it—Howard W. Hubbard.I was on assignment at a large senior condominium complex in Towson, Maryland when thewait staff thoroughly surprised "Howard" with this birthday cake.
(
16.)
The famous poem"Desiderata" ends with ". . .with all its sham, drudgery and broken dreams, it still is a beautiful world. Strive to be happy." These three seniors found that beautiful world righthere. I'm so blessed to have found them and their happiness.ML and I live right over that ridge line of trees exploding with the ruby red mackrelsky at sunup on the day after Christmas 2008. We were watching the morning newsand saw the approaching sunrise growing over Chesapeake Bay during the weather report. I told my wife, "I have about five minutes to catch this one. It's going to be akiller." I raced a mile up Patapsco Road, set up my tripod and "nailed it."
(17.)
And for sunsets, there were the rolling fields of ripe soybeans at the intersection of Rts. 32and 97 in Westminster last fall. The "rubber neckers" at that busy crossroads couldn't reallyappreciate the full view of those fields on "fire"
(18.)
and the "flames" lapping at sundown.By now you can see I step back and forth between the real world of people andthat of the good earth. There are times when I stumble upon, say, a dead sycamore
(19.)
in astream flanked by live trees moments before sundown holding onto fall with traces of red,yellow and gold, and wonder what it would have been like to have taken the path asa wildlife/nature photographer. But I already know the answer. I'd miss people.I'd miss finding people plopped in the middle of a memorable sundown atIce Planet in Eldersburg.
(20.)
It was shot to illustrate a story on sno-ball stands for 
Carroll Magazine 
.There are people who travel from all over the world to this pasture to see the maresof Hanover Shoe Farms. They are the standard of excellence for standardbred horsestrained with the unusual gait of a "pacer" used in the sport of sulky racing. Ihappened to travel up from Westminster and crossed over into Pennsylvania to findthe brood mares grazing in this dawn's golden light.
(21.)
 Sometimes it doesn't matter that my drawing ability is still what is was when I was inkindergarten. I stumbled upon this scene
(22.)
at the edge of Uniontown with JimmySaylor "skinning" one of his mules, heading back Bob Sabastian's lane through the"sketch" of a first snow.But then there are times when an image just drops in my lap. It was ten days ago, Sunday,October 24, 2010. I was printing for this show in my studio when I heard a loud roar outside. I heard it again and recognized it. "Fred (he's my four-legged assistant), it's a bal-loon." A hot air balloon
(23.)
was actually drifting over the peak of fall right above our home.
-3-

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