Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Classic Posters - Eric King -- Poster Archivist Pioneer

Classic Posters - Eric King -- Poster Archivist Pioneer

Ratings: (0)|Views: 53|Likes:
Published by Michael Erlewine
These are articles on concert-music posters and poster collecting from the site ClassicPosters.com founded by award-winning archivist of popular culture Michael Erlewine who founded All-Music Guide, All-Movie Guide, Astrologyland.com and many other popular Internet sites. All articles copyright and written or produced by Michael Erlewine. Do visit ClassicPosters.com in its current incarnation.
These are articles on concert-music posters and poster collecting from the site ClassicPosters.com founded by award-winning archivist of popular culture Michael Erlewine who founded All-Music Guide, All-Movie Guide, Astrologyland.com and many other popular Internet sites. All articles copyright and written or produced by Michael Erlewine. Do visit ClassicPosters.com in its current incarnation.

More info:

Published by: Michael Erlewine on Jan 08, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

05/12/2014

pdf

text

original

 
Classic Posters - Eric King -- PosterArchivist Pioneer
 
Classic Posters - Eric King --PosterArchivist Pioneer
 by Michael Erlewine
Victor Moscoso and Eric King 
 Eric King's connection with psychedelicposters and the San Francisco scenegoes back to the mid 1960s, when herelocated from the east coast in Augustof 1965 to become a graduate student inEnglish literature at the University ofCalifornia at Berkeley. Early in 1966,while walking down Telegraph Avenue,in Berkeley, a kid gave him a handbill fora Family Dog dance. He thinks it wasprobably, "The Love." "What the hell isthis?," he thought. "It's neat!," and hestuffed it into a book. He soon foundhimself going to one of the early dances.
'The Love' Family Dog Handbill 
 What he experienced at the dance hallsof San Francisco was a far cry from theNew York concerts, shows by AlanFreed, and other rock events, that hehad known. The light shows, theextended music, the whole experiencewas something new."I think I went first to the Fillmore. Well,this wall is jumping all over the placeand there's all these people hopping upand down. And it was just incredible. I'dheard people tell me about them. It washard to describe these things, even tosomebody who'd been to rock and rollshows; and it's very hard tocommunicate now, to anybody, whatthese things were like, because theyreally were something like nothing else.It really was the greatest party since thefall of the Roman Empire.""People would shake hands, dance acouple of times and leave and (chuckle)go screw; there was a lot of sex goingon. This was an intensely sexualizedenvironment. All these people had livedthrough the incredibly uptight fifties. Itwas like -- in the words of a cousin --like letting a lion out of a cage, meaningthe sexuality of a large segment of the
 
Classic Posters - Eric King -- PosterArchivist Pioneer
 
population was literally released.Remember there was this doorwaybetween the coming of the pill and thecoming of aids. People did a lot ofscrewing. There wasn't a lot ofconversation. You danced. You dancedwith people. It was like watchingwhooping cranes dance up and downand mate."All of this made a real impact of King,who saw the posters as more thanannouncements. He knew he waslooking at art, and began to collect themfrom early on. When he returned from asummer in Florida, in August of 1966,he was aware that he had missed a lotof posters and set about finding them byputting up signs on telephone polesalong Telegraph avenue, asking whohad some for sale. He ended up buyinga whole stack of them.Being highly organized and of acollector's (archival) mind, he foundhimself organizing what he had intopiles, storing them by venue, andcomparing notes with other collectors.He states that he was trading with othercollectors no later than the spring of1967. At this point, he kept all of hisinformation in his head. He did not makenotes. King also was on the mailing listfor the major venues, to receive theirpostcards. Eric King, according to hisown account, was soon interviewingmany poster-related figures, artists,printers, and related people, withconstant questions.King credits two other collectors withsystematically accumulating information,the artist Randy Tuten, and a fellowcollector by the name of Greg Davidson."Davidson also accumulated a massiveamount of information, and whathappened was that I took my entirecollection over to this fellow's house. Hehad sold at the Marin Flea Market foryears. People would come up to himand say "I've got twenty posters." andhe'd buy them. He'd take anything thatwas different and put them in his ownlittle pile. He tended to have the samementality as Jacaeber, and I. He had agood eye and he would remember whathe had seen. If he saw something new,he did not have to have the old one nextto him."According to King, he and Davidsonwould get together, sit down and gothrough their collections, comparingposters, one by one, variation byvariation, all from their knowledge andmemory. They went through everything.Then, in the late 1970s, when posterreprints were abundant and someunscrupulous dealers began to makeextra money selling reprints as originals."At this point the artists came after me.They said, listen, if this goes uncheckedno one will collect this stuff, and we willlose out. It is not as though our art willdie, but there will be much less interestin it, we will make less money and ourreputations will be besmirched. You arethe only person who has all thisinformation and we gave it to you. Wegave you hours and hours and hours;we put up with you and tolerated you,because we liked you, but you botheredthe hell out of us. You owe us. Write abook. I said "Ah man, I don't want to."And they said, "Don't give us any shit.Our reputation for the future is going torest on whether there is, or is not." Theyall had the foresight at this point torecognize that there had to be a guide.This was in 1977.""I knew people knew that I was workingon this thing. What happened was I said

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->