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Globalization and Environmental

Globalization and Environmental

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Published by Pablo Chan
This paper seeks to explain the relationship between globalisation and the environment and propose a new framework for setting global environmental policies, including the use of worldwide environmental information and technology clearing-houses.
This paper seeks to explain the relationship between globalisation and the environment and propose a new framework for setting global environmental policies, including the use of worldwide environmental information and technology clearing-houses.

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Categories:Types, Research, Law
Published by: Pablo Chan on Jan 09, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/24/2013

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21 July 2004
Globalization and EnvironmentalProtection: a Global GovernancePerspective
Daniel C. Esty and Maria Ivanova
Yale School of Forestry & Environmental Studies
Working Paper No. 0402
 
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SUMMARY
In this chapter, we disaggregate the impact of globalization on the environment intoeconomic, regulatory, information, and pluralization effects. We complement thisstructure with an analysis of how national and global environmental policies affectglobalization. We then argue that there is a need for a revitalized governance regime toorganize and maintain environmental cooperation at the global level. Such a globalenvironmental mechanism (GEM) would provide a new model for collaboration,overcoming the shortcomings of existing bodies. The GEM’s core elements would be (1)a global information clearinghouse that provides a data and analytic foundation forenvironmental decision-making at the global, national, regional, and local scales, (2) aglobal technology clearinghouse to highlight tools and strategies for improved pollutioncontrol and natural resource management, and (3) a global environmental bargainingforum that would provide a catalyst for international negotiations. We conclude that theGEM approach with a ‘light’ institutional architecture that relies on global public-policynetworks and modern information technologies offers great promise because of itsresponse speed, flexibility, cost-effectiveness, and potential for broader publicparticipation – all leading to improved results and greater institutional legitimacy.
INTRODUCTION
Globalisation has ushered in an era of contrasts – one of fast-paced change and persistentproblems. It has spurred a growing degree of interdependence among economies andsocieties through transboundary flows of information, ideas, technologies, goods,services, capital, and people. In so doing, it has challenged the traditional capacity of national governments to regulate and control markets and activities. The rapid pace of economic integration has led to interlinked world markets and economies, requiring adegree of synchronisation of national policies across a number of issues. One dimensionof this coordination concerns the environment – from shared natural resources such asfisheries and biological diversity to the potential for transboundary pollution spilloversacross the land, over water, and through the air. We now understand that governanceapproaches that are bounded by the traditional notion of national territorial sovereigntycannot protect us from global-scale environmental threats. An effective response to thesechallenges will require fresh thinking, refined strategies, and new mechanisms forinternational cooperation.In this chapter, we address the relationship between globalisation and the environment,seeking to answer four key questions: (1) How does globalisation affect the environment?(2) Conversely, how does national environmental regulation affect globalisation,particularly economic integration? (3) When is a degree of international cooperationuseful or even necessary? (4) What institutional structure would best manageinterdependence and foster the opportunities that globalisation has the potential toprovide?Globalisation can have both positive and negative environmental consequences. But thesame forces can exacerbate existing environmental problems and create new ones, as well

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