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Shipibo Ayahuasca Shamans - Part 1

Shipibo Ayahuasca Shamans - Part 1

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Published by Howard G Charing
Interviews with three Shipibo Shamans, Benjamin Ochavano, Leoncio Garcia, and Enrique Lopez by Howard G Charing and Peter Cloudsley
Interviews with three Shipibo Shamans, Benjamin Ochavano, Leoncio Garcia, and Enrique Lopez by Howard G Charing and Peter Cloudsley

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Published by: Howard G Charing on Jan 09, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reserved

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07/10/2013

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SHIPIBO
 
SHIPIBO
 
AYAHUASCAAYAHUASCA
 
SHAMANSSHAMANS
 
INTERVIEWSINTERVIEWS
 
PART
 
1PART
 
1
 
Howard
 
G
 
Charing
 
&
 
Peter
 
Cloudsley
 
©
www.shamanism.co.uk
 
 
THE
 
SHIPIBO
 
The
 
Shipibo
 
are
 
one
 
of 
 
the
 
largest
 
ethnic
 
groups
 
in
 
the
 
Peru
vian
 
Amazon.
 
These
 
ethnic
 
groups
 
each
 
have
 
their
 
own
 
lan
guages,
 
traditions
 
and
 
culture.
 
The
 
Shipibo
 
which
 
currently
 
number
 
about
 
20,000
 
are
 
spread
 
out
 
in
 
communities
 
through
 
the
 
Pucallpa
 
/
 
Ucayali
 
river
 
region.
 
They
 
are
 
highly
 
regarded
 
in
 
the
 
Amazon
 
as
 
being
 
masters
 
of 
 
Ayahuasca
 
.
 
AYAHUASCA
 
Ayahuasca
 
is
 
the
 
 jungle
 
medicine
 
of 
 
the
 
upper
 
Amazon.
 
It
 
is
 
made
 
from
 
the
 
ayahuasca
 
vine
 
(
 
Banisteriopsis
 
Caapi)
 
and
 
the
 
leaf 
 
of 
 
the
 
Chacruna
 
plant
 
(Psychotria
 
Viridis).
 
The
 
two
 
make
 
a
 
potent
 
medicine
 
which
 
opens
 
the
 
doors
 
to
 
experiencing
 
the
 
energetic
 
world
 
which
 
underlies
 
the
 
world
 
of 
 
everyday.
 
The
 
vine
 
is
 
an
 
inhibitor
 
which
 
contains
 
harmala
 
and
 
harmaline
 
among
 
other
 
alkaloids,
 
and
 
the
 
leaf 
 
contains
 
vision
 
inducing
 
alkaloids.
 
As
 
with
 
all
 
natural
 
medicines,
 
it
 
is
 
a
 
mixture
 
of 
 
many
 
alkaloids
 
that
 
makes
 
their
 
unique
 
properties.
 
Ayahuasca
 
is
 
a
 
name
 
derived
 
from
 
two
 
Quechua
 
words:
 
aya
 
means
 
spirit,
 
ancestor,
 
deceased
 
per
son,
 
and
 
huasca
 
means
 
vine
 
or
 
rope,
 
hence
 
it
 
is
 
known
 
as
 
vine
 
of 
 
the
 
dead 
 
or
 
vine
 
of 
 
the
 
soul.
 
It
 
is
 
also
 
known
 
by
 
many
 
other
 
local
 
names
 
including
 
yaje,
 
caapi,
 
natema,
 
 pinde,
 
daime,
 
mihi,
 
&
 
dapa
.
 
It
 
plays
 
a
 
central
 
role
 
in
 
the
 
spiritual,
 
religious
 
and
 
cultural
 
tra
ditions
 
of 
 
the
 
Indigenous
 
and
 
Mestizo
 
(mixed
 
blood)
 
peoples
 
of 
 
the
 
upper
 
Amazon,
 
Orinoco
 
plains
 
and
 
the
 
Pacific
 
coast
 
of 
 
Colombia
 
and
 
Ecuador.
 
To
 
understand
 
ayahuasca
 
in
 
the
 
local
 
context,
 
one
 
cannot
 
avoid
 
taking
 
a
 
look
 
at
 
the
 
ecological
 
environ
ment,
 
such
 
as
 
the
 
rainforest,
 
cultural
 
environment
 
and
 
indigenous
 
cultures.
 
This
 
has
 
structured
 
the
 
cul
tural
 
content
 
of 
 
ayahuasca.
 
One
 
of 
 
the
 
more
 
romantic
 
stories
 
takes
 
place
 
amongst
 
the
 
Shipibo
 
people
 
who
 
live
 
up
 
the
 
river
 
in
 
the
 
heart
 
of 
 
the
 
 jungle
 
in
 
the
 
Peruvian
 
Amazon.
 
This
 
tale
 
is
 
centered
 
around
 
women,
 
more
 
so
 
than
 
men,
 
as
 
they
 
look
 
after
 
the
 
children
 
and
 
their
 
health,
 
whilst
 
the
 
men
 
are
 
out
 
hunting
 
and
 
fishing.
 
Men
 
are
 
more
 
interested
 
in
 
plants
 
that
 
aid
 
their
 
inner
 
spirits
 
when
 
hunting
 
,
 
whilst
 
women
 
are
 
more
 
interested
 
in
 
plants
 
that
 
will
 
allow
 
their
 
children
 
to
 
grow.
 
There
 
was
 
one
 
particular
 
woman
 
who
 
was
 
very
 
interested
 
in
 
plants,
 
who
 
liked
 
to
 
pick
 
the
 
leaves
 
of 
 
different
 
plants.
 
She
 
would
 
then
 
crush
 
the
 
leaves
 
into
 
a
 
pot
 
and
 
soak
 
them
 
in
 
water
 
over
 
night.
 
She
 
would
 
then
 
take
 
a
 
bath
 
every
 
morning
 
before
 
sunrise
 
(the
 
way
 
to
 
find
 
out
 
about
 
various
 
plants
 
and
 
their
 
effects
 
is
 
to
 
bathe
 
in
 
them).
 
She
 
bathed
 
in
 
them
 
every
 
morning
 
until
 
she
 
had
 
a
 
dream.
 
In
 
her
 
dream
 
a
 
woman
 
came
 
and
 
said,
 
“why
 
are
 
you
 
bathing
 
every
 
day?”
 
She
 
answered
 
“I
 
am
 
doing
 
this
 
as
 
I
 
want
 
you
 
to
 
teach
 
me.”
 
The
 
other
 
woman
 
said
 
“You
 
must
 
seek
 
out
 
my
 
uncle,
 
his
 
name
 
is
 
Kamarampi.
 
I
 
will
 
show
 
you
 
where
 
to
 
find
 
him”.
 
The
 
woman
 
led
 
the
 
other
 
woman
 
to
 
her
 
uncle.
 
The
 
uncle
 
showed
 
her
 
how
 
to
 
mix
 
the
 
leaves
 
of 
 
the
 
chacruna,
 
which
 
was
 
a
 
bush
 
she
 
had
 
taken
 
leaves
 
from
 
to
 
bathe
 
in.
 
He
 
showed
 
her
 
how
 
to
 
prepare
 
the
 
brew
 
of 
 
Ayahuasca,
 
he
 
told
 
her
 
to
 
go
 
and
 
tell
 
the
 
people
 
the
 
knowledge
 
of 
 
how
 
to
 
use
 
the
 
brew.
 
2
 
 
BENJAMIN
 
OCHAVANO
 
Benjamin
 
Ochavano
 
Is
 
a
 
traditional 
 
Shipibo
 
Muraya.(elder 
 
shaman).
 
He
 
is
 
in
 
his
 
eighties.
 
His
 
chants
 
(icaros)
 
sung
 
in
 
the
 
Shipibo
 
language
 
are
 
extraordinary,
 
beautiful 
 
and 
 
with
 
a
 
 powerful 
 
vocal 
 
range.
 
I
 
first
 
started
 
taking
 
ayahuasca
 
at
 
the
 
age
 
of 
 
10,
 
with
 
my
 
father,
 
who
 
was
 
also
 
a
 
shaman.
 
When
 
I
 
was
 
15,
 
he
 
took
 
me
 
into
 
the
 
selva
 
to
 
do
 
plant
 
diets,
 
nobody
 
would
 
see
 
us
 
for
 
a
 
whole
 
year,
 
we
 
had
 
no
 
con
tact
 
with
 
women,
 
nothing.
 
We
 
lived
 
in
 
a
 
simple
 
tambo
 
sleeping
 
on
 
leaves
 
with
 
 just
 
a
 
sheet
 
over
 
us.
 
We
 
dieted
 
plants:
 
ayauma,
 
 pucha
tekicaspi,
 
 pucarobona,
 
huairacaspi,
 
verenaquu.
 
I
 
would
 
take
 
each
 
plant
 
for
 
2
 
months
 
before
 
moving
 
on
 
to
 
the
 
next,
 
a
 
whole
 
year
 
without
 
women!
 
The
 
only
 
fish
 
allowed
 
is
 
boquichico
 
 –
 
a
 
vegetarian
 
fish
 
and
 
mushed
 
plantains
 
made
 
into
 
a
 
thick
 
drink
 
ca
lled
 
 pururuco
 
in
 
Shipibo,
 
or
 
chapo
 
without
 
sugar.
 
Then
 
I
 
had
 
about
 
a
 
year’s
 
rest
 
before
 
going
 
again
 
with
 
my
 
uncle,
 
Jo
se
 
Sánchez,
 
for
 
another
 
year
 
and
 
7
 
months
 
of 
 
dieting
 
on
 
the
 
little
 
Rio
 
Pisqui.
 
He
 
taught
 
me
 
alot
 
and
 
gave
 
me
 
chonta,
 
cascabel,
 
hergon,
 
nacanaca,
 
cayucayu.
 
He
 
was
 
a
 
chontero
,
 
a
 
kind
 
of 
 
shaman
 
who
 
works
 
with
 
darts
 
(in
 
the
 
spiritual
 
world)
 
 –
 
so
 
called
 
because
 
real
 
darts
 
and
 
arrows
 
for
 
hunting
 
are
 
made
 
from
 
the
 
black
 
splintery
 
bamboo
 
called
 
chonta
.
 
A
 
chontero
 
can
 
send
 
darts
 
with
 
positive
 
effects
 
like
 
knowledge
 
and
 
power
 
too,
 
and
 
he
 
knows
 
how
 
to
 
suck
 
and
 
remove
 
poisoned
 
darts
 
which
 
have
 
caused
 
illness
 
or
 
evil
 
spells.
 
To
 
finish
 
off 
 
he
 
gave
 
me
 
chullachaqui 
 
caspi.
 
Then
 
I
 
began
 
living
 
with
 
my
 
wife
 
and
 
working
 
as
 
a
 
cu
randero
 
in
 
Juancito
 
on
 
the
 
Ucayali.
 
Later
 
I
 
went
 
to
 
Pucallpa
 
where
 
I
 
still
 
live
 
some
 
of 
 
the
 
time
 
when
 
I’m
 
not
 
in
 
my
 
community
 
of 
 
Paoyhan,
 
where
 
my
 
 Ani 
 
Sheati 
 
project
 
is.
 
The
 
most
 
important
 
 planta
 
maestra
 
is
 
 Ayauma
 
chullacha
qui.
 
Then
 
Pucalo
 
 puno
 
(Quechua)
 
the
 
bark
 
of 
 
a
 
tree
 
which
 
grows
 
to
 
40
 
or
 
50
 
meters.
 
This
 
is
 
one
 
of 
 
a
 
number
 
of 
 
plants
 
that
 
is
 
consumed
 
together
 
with
 
tobacco
 
and
 
is
 
so
 
strong,
 
you
 
only
 
need
 
to
 
take
 
it
 
two
 
times.
 
It
 
requires
 
a
 
diet
 
of 
 
6
 
month.
 
You
 
drink
 
it
 
in
 
the
 
morning,
 
then
 
lie
 
down,
 
you
 
are
 
in
 
an
 
altered
 
state
 
for
 
a
 
whole
 
day
 
after
wards.
 
Another
 
plant
 
is
 
Catahua
 
whose
 
resin
 
is
 
cooked
 
with
 
ta
bacco.
 
You
 
must
 
be
 
sure
 
that
 
no
 
one
 
sees
 
you
 
while
 
you
 
take
 
it.
 
It
 
puts
 
you
 
into
 
a
 
sleep
 
of 
 
powerful
 
dreams.
 
 Ajosquiro
 
is
 
from
 
a
 
tree
 
which
 
grows
 
to
 
20m,
 
with
 
a
 
penetrating
 
aroma
 
like
 
garlic.
 
It
 
gives
 
you
 
mental
 
strength,
 
it
 
is
 
very
 
healing
 
and
 
makes
 
you
 
strong.
 
It
 
takes
 
away
 
lazy
 
feelings,
 
gives
 
you
 
courage
 
and
 
self 
 
esteem,
 
but
 
can
 
be
 
used
 
to
 
explore
 
the
 
negative
 
side
 
as
 
well
 
as
 
the
 
positive.
 
You
 
can
 
be
 
alone
 
in
 
the
 
wilderness
 
yet
 
feel
 
in
 
the
 
company
 
of 
 
many.
 
It
 
puts
 
you
 
into
 
the
 
psycho
magical
 
world
 
which
 
we
 
have
 
inherited
 
from
 
our
 
ancestors,
 
the
 
great
 
morayos
 
(=shamans
 
in
 
Shipibo)
 
so
 
you
 
can
 
gain
 
knowledge
 
of 
 
how
 
to
 
heal
 
with
 
plants.
 
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