Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword or section
Like this
18Activity

Table Of Contents

BECOMING A “NORMAL” COUNTRY
CHINA TO THE FUTURE
USING THIS TEXTBOOK
BIBLIOGRAPHY
ILEGACIES AND SETTING
1The Geographical Setting
1.1LANDFORMS
1.2CLIMATE AND WATER
1.3PROVINCES AND REGIONS
1.4MINERAL RESOURCES
1.5CONCLUSION:REGIONAL DIFFERENTIATION
2The Chinese Economy Before 1949
2.1THE TRADITIONAL ECONOMY,1127–1911
2.1.1High-Productivity Traditional Agriculture
2.1.2The Commercialized Countryside
2.1.2.1Sophisticated Institutions
2.1.2.2Competitive Markets
2.1.2.3Small-Scale,“Bottom-Heavy” Economy
2.1.3Crisis of the Traditional Economy?
2.1.4The Failed Response to the West and Japan
2.2THE BEGINNINGS OF INDUSTRIALIZATION,1912–1937
2.2.1Industry
2.3WAR AND CIVIL WAR,1937–1949
2.3.2The Rise of Manchuria
2.3.3Increased State Intervention
2.3.4Inflation
2.4LEGACIES OF THE PRE–1949 ECONOMY
2.4.1Legacy for the Socialist Era (1949–1978)
2.4.2Legacy for the Post–1978 Market Economy
Instability
3.1THE BIG PUSH DEVELOPMENT STRATEGY
3.2THE COMMAND ECONOMIC SYSTEM IN CHINA
3.3POLICY INSTABILITY
3.3.1Economic Recovery,1949–1952
3.3.3Retrenchment:The “Hundred Flowers” of 1956–1957
3.3.4The Great Leap Forward,1958–1960
3.3.5Retrenchment:Crisis and “Readjustment,” 1961–1963
3.3.7Retrenchment:The Cultural Revolution,1967–1969
3.3.8The Maoist Model:A New Leap in 1970
3.3.9Retrenchment:Consolidation and Drift,1972–1976
3.3.10The Leap Outward:1978 and the End of Maoism
3.4LEGACIES OF THE SOCIALIST PERIOD
3.4.1The Legacy of Policy Instability
3.4.2The Shortcomings of the Development Strategy
3.4.3Human Capital Base
4Market Transition:Strategy and Process
4.1THE CHINESE APPROACH TO TRANSITION
4.3A TWO-PHASE FRAMEWORK OF ECONOMIC REFORM
4.4ELEMENTS OF CHINA’S TRANSITION THROUGH 1992
4.4.1Dual-Track System
4.4.2Growing Out of the Plan
4.4.3Particularistic Contracts
4.4.4Entry
4.4.5Prices Equating Supply and Demand
4.4.6Incremental Managerial Reforms Instead of Privatization
4.4.7Disarticulation
4.4.9Continued High Saving and Investment
4.4.10Conclusion of First-Phase Reforms
4.5THE TIANANMEN INTERLUDE
4.6THE SECOND PHASE OF REFORM,1993–PRESENT
4.6.1Prerequisites
4.6.1.1Market Reunification
4.6.1.2Recentralization
4.6.1.3Macroeconomic Austerity
4.6.2.1Fiscal and Tax System
4.6.2.2Banking and Financial System
4.6.2.3Corporate Governance
4.6.3Outcomes
4.6.3.1From Inflation to Price Stability
4.6.3.3Privatization
4.6.3.4Reform with Losers
4.7CONTEMPORARY CHALLENGES
5The Urban–Rural Divide
5.1.1Origins of the Urban–Rural Divide
5.1.2The Urban Economic System
5.1.2.1The Danwei
5.1.2.2Urban Property Rights
5.1.3The Rural Economic System
5.1.3.1Rural Collectives
5.1.3.2Rural Property Rights
5.1.5Invisible Walls:Administrative Barriers Today
5.2URBANIZATION
5.3RURAL–URBAN MIGRATION
5.3.1Overview of Migration
5.3.2Characteristics of Migrants
5.4ECONOMIC CONSEQUENCES OF THE URBAN–RURAL DIVIDE
5.4.1Living Standards and Restrictions on Mobility
5.4.2Addressing the Urban–Rural Divide
5.5CONCLUSION
IIPATTERNS OF GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT
6Growth and Structural Change
6.1GROWTH
6.1.1Data and the Measurement of Growth
6.1.2Growth in Comparative Perspective
6.1.3Instability in Growth
6.2INVESTMENT
6.3STRUCTURAL CHANGE:COMMON PATTERNS
6.4STRUCTURAL CHANGE IN CHINA:LABOR
6.5STRUCTURAL CHANGE IN CHINA:GDP
6.6STRUCTURAL CHANGE AND GLOBALIZATION
6.7CONCLUSION
7Population Growth and the One-Child Family
7.1THE DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION
7.2CHINA’S DEMOGRAPHIC TRANSITION
7.3THE ROLE OF GOVERNMENT POLICY
7.4CONSEQUENCES OF THE ONE-CHILD POLICY
7.5CHANGING AGE STRUCTURE OF THE POPULATION
7.6CONCLUSION
8Labor and Human Capital
8.1THE INSTITUTIONAL TRANSFORMATION OF CHINESE LABOR
8.1.1The Labor Force
8.1.2Employment:Ownership and Labor Mobility
8.1.5Rural Labor Markets
8.2HOW WELL DO LABOR MARKETS FUNCTION IN CHINA TODAY?
8.2.1Returns to Education
8.2.2Human Capital and Educational Attainment
8.2.3Other Attributes
8.2.4The Migration Decision
8.2.5Labor Markets Concluded
8.3SOCIAL SECURITY
8.4CONCLUSION
9.1INCOME GROWTH
9.2POVERTY
9.2.1Rural Poverty
9.2.1.1Official Poverty Line
9.2.1.3Explaining Poverty Trends
9.2.2Urban Poverty
9.2.3Overall Poverty
9.3INEQUALITY
9.3.1Accounting for All Income Sources
9.4PHYSICAL QUALITY OF LIFE INDICATORS
9.4.1Life Expectancy at Birth
9.4.2Other Health-Related Indicators
9.4.3Education
9.4.4Human Development Index
CONCLUSION
IIITHE RURAL ECONOMY
10Rural Organization
10.1THE CHINESE VILLAGE
10.2AGRICULTURAL COLLECTIVES
10.2.1Features of the Agricultural Collectives
10.2.2Discussion of Collectives
10.4THE EMERGENCE OF RURAL LAND MARKETS
11Agriculture:Output,Inputs,and Technology
11.1OVERVIEW OF POST–1949 AGRICULTURE
IN AGRICULTURE
11.3THE GREEN REVOLUTION
11.3.1Irrigation
11.3.2Agricultural Chemicals
11.3.3Seeds
11.4MOTIVE POWER IN THE COUNTRYSIDE
11.5OUTPUT AND YIELDS:THE CHALLENGE OF INTENSIFICATION
11.6DIVERSIFICATION AND THE CHALLENGE OF THE FUTURE
11.7GENETICALLY MODIFIED ORGANISMS
11.8GLOBALIZATION
12Rural Industrialization:Township and Village Enterprises
12.1ORIGINS OF THE TVEs
12.2THE GOLDEN AGE OF TVE DEVELOPMENT
12.3CAUSES OF RAPID GROWTH
12.4DIVERSE REGIONAL MODELS OF TVE DEVELOPMENT
12.4.1The Southern Jiangsu (Sunan) Model
12.4.2The Wenzhou Model
12.4.3The Pearl River Delta Model
12.4.4Failed or Absent TVE Development
12.5THE TRANSFORMATION OF TVEs IN THE NEW CENTURY
12.5.1The Changing Economic Environment of TVEs
12.5.2TVE Restructuring:The Great Privatization
12.5.2.1National Policy and Local Models
12.5.2.2Market Conditions and Privatization
12.5.2.3Insider Privatization
TWENTY-FIRST CENTURY
13.1.2Ownership Change from 1996 Through the Present
13.2INDUSTRIAL FINANCE
13.3TRANSFORMING CORPORATE GOVERNANCE IN THE STATE
13.3.1Creating Corporate Governance:Transition A
13.3.2Creating Corporations:Transition B
13.3.2.2The Chinese System in Practice
13.3.2.3Typology of Corporate Governance Systems
13.4PRIVATIZATION AND HYBRID OWNERSHIP
13.5CONCLUSION
14Structural Change:Industry,Energy,and Infrastructure
14.1GROWTH AND STRUCTURAL CHANGE IN MANUFACTURING
14.1.1Regional Growth Patterns
14.2ENERGY
14.2.1Energy Efficiency of the Economy
14.2.2The Three Main Energy Sectors
14.2.2.1Coal
14.2.2.2Oil and Gas
14.2.2.3Electric Power
14.2.3Energy Security,Diversification,and Imports
14.3TELECOMMUNICATIONS
14.4COMMON FEATURES:INFRASTRUCTURE INVESTMENT
14.5CONCLUSION
15Technology Policy and the Knowledge-based Economy
15.1PURSUING CRITICAL TECHNOLOGIES:THE R&D EFFORT
15.1.1The Trajectory of China’s Technology Effort
15.1.2Strategies of R&D Investment
15.1.2.1Do It Yourself
15.1.2.2Buy It
15.1.2.3Bargain for It
15.1.2.4Seed It
15.1.2.5Encourage Spin-offs
15.1.2.6Open Up to Foreign Direct Investment
15.1.2.7Support Domestic Entrepreneurship
15.2HUMAN CAPITAL RESOURCE BASE
15.3THE OUTPUT OF THE R&D EFFORT
15.6CONCLUSION
VCHINA AND THE WORLD ECONOMY
16International Trade
16.1BACKGROUND
16.2THE PROCESS OF TRADE REFORM
16.2.1Initial Reform Steps
16.2.2Liberalizing the Foreign-Trade System
16.4TOWARD AN OPEN ECONOMY
16.4.1Currency Convertibility
16.4.2World Trade Organization Membership
16.4.3Openness Revisited
16.5OUTCOMES:RAPID GROWTH AND STRUCTURAL CHANGE
16.5.1Exports
16.5.2Imports
16.5.3High Technology Trade
16.6REGIONAL COMPOSITION OF TRADE WITHIN CHINA
16.7CONCLUSION
17Foreign Investment
17.1FDI IN THE CHINESE ECONOMY
REGIME
17.3THE INVESTMENT REGIME TODAY
17.4SOURCES OF INVESTMENT IN CHINA
17.5THE CHINA CIRCLE
17.6FDI IN CONTEXT
17.6.1Sectoral Composition of FDI:The WTO Impact
17.6.2Modes of Capital Inflow
17.7CONCLUSION
VIMACROECONOMICS AND FINANCE
18Macroeconomic Trends and Cycles
18.1TRENDS IN NATIONAL SAVING
18.2THE FISCAL SYSTEM AND FISCAL REFORM
18.7CONCLUSION
19Financial System
19.2THE BANKING SYSTEM
19.2.1State-Owned Commercial Banks
19.2.2Joint-Stock Commercial Banks
19.2.3City Banks
19.2.4Other Banks
19.2.4.1Policy Banks
19.2.4.2Rural Credit Cooperatives
19.2.4.3The Fringe
19.2.5Central Bank and Regulatory Apparatus
19.3WEAKNESS OF THE BANKING SYSTEM
19.4STOCK MARKETS:LEARNING TO CRAWL?
19.4.2Characteristics of the Market
19.4.2.1Circulating and Noncirculating Shares
19.4.2.2Low Contestability
19.4.2.3Rationing of Listing Opportunities
19.4.2.4Thin Markets
19.4.2.6Policy-Driven Market
19.4.2.7Insider Control and Manipulation
19.4.4Institutional Investors
19.5BOND MARKETS
19.6OTHER FINANCIAL MARKETS
19.7CONCLUSION
VIICONCLUSION:CHINA’S FUTURE
20Environmental Quality and the Sustainability of Growth
20.1POLLUTION
20.1.1Air Pollution
20.1.2Water Pollution
20.1.3Costs of Pollution
20.1.4.Pollution Control
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
The Chinese Economy Transition and Growth

The Chinese Economy Transition and Growth

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,320 |Likes:
Published by bilalj

More info:

Published by: bilalj on Jan 18, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

04/11/2013

pdf

text

original

You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 11 to 15 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 26 to 310 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 321 to 448 are not shown in this preview.
You're Reading a Free Preview
Pages 466 to 545 are not shown in this preview.

Activity (18)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
derekgg liked this
Rahim Spencer liked this
Allan Mathenge liked this
Allan Mathenge liked this
Rahim Spencer liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->