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10 Food Fitness Assessment Guide Sections 1-7 March 2008

10 Food Fitness Assessment Guide Sections 1-7 March 2008

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#1 - OVERVIEW OF ASSESSMENT AND PLANNING
-- FOOD AND FITNESS INITIATIVE PLANNING GUIDE SERIES --
Contents:
 
A .Purpose Statement..........................................................................................................Page 1B. Introduction to Assessment for Food and Fitness..........................................................Page 1C. The Assessment Phase...................................................................................................Page 6D. The Planning Phase........................................................................................................Page 9
A. Purpose Statement
The Food and Fitness Planning Guide series is intended to provide guidance and a strategicapproach to assessment and planning for the Food and Fitness collaboratives. It is intended tohelp community collaboratives think about how assessment and planning can help create theCommunity Action Plan and provide a foundation for implementation. Some collaboratives mayfind that the guide validates their current approach, while others may rethink aspects of theirproposed assessment plans because of elements that were previously overlooked but identifiedwhile reviewing the guide. The purpose of this overview document is to introduce a framework for assessment and planning that is consistent throughout all of the tools in this series.This guide is not intended as a prescription for assessment and planning. Food and Fitnesscollaboratives must balance the depth and breadth of their assessment activities with practicalconstraints such as limited access to existing data and financial and human resources forcollecting new information. They must also pursue information that is appropriate based oncommunity conditions and their vision.
B. Introduction to Assessment for Food and Fitness
In order to help build a shared understanding and support the planning process for Food andFitness collaboratives, the Technical Assistance Providers (TAP) Group proposes an overallassessment and planning framework for the Food and Fitness initiative. Using thiscomprehensive approach to assessment and planning will help yield: 1) a set of strategicpriorities for policy and systems change focused on active living and healthy eating opportunitiesfor low income families and communities, 2) a Community Action Plan for advancing thosestrategic priorities that is guided by a community vision and grounded by pragmaticconsiderations; and 3) a diverse collaborative with the common vision, collective will,community ties, and shared capacity to implement the plan.The remaining text describes
Figure 1
below.
W.K Kellogg Foundation March 2008 Overview Page 1 of 
10
 
 
 
Figure 1
Food & Fitness Environment Goals
Feasibility
Food & Fitness Assessment Model
Food & Fitness Environment Goals
Community/PartnerPreferences andReadinessPolicy & SystemsChangeOpportunitiesBuilt Environmentand FoodEnvironment
Community ImpactHealth Equity
 Validate withpartners andcommunity 
AssessmentPlanning
Check partnershipcapacity 
CommunityActionPlan
Data AnalysisGenerate Policy & Systems Change Targets and Strategies
Determine Strategic OptionsStrategic Priorities
3 Streams of Assessment Data
Community Design Active TransportationParksRecreationSchoolsProducingProcessingDistributingRetailingPreparingEatin
Fitness DomainsFood Domains
Collective Multicultural Vision/Community Goals
 
Feasibility
 
Feasibility
Food & Fitness Assessment Model
Community/PartnerPreferences andReadiness
 
Community/PartnerPreferences andReadinessPolicy & SystemsChangeOpportunities
 
Policy & SystemsChangeOpportunitiesBuilt Environmentand FoodEnvironment
 
Built Environmentand FoodEnvironment
Community Impact
 
Community ImpactHealth Equity
 
Health Equity
 Validate withpartners andcommunity 
AssessmentPlanning
Check partnershipcapacity 
CommunityActionPlan
Data AnalysisGenerate Policy & Systems Change Targets and Strategies
Determine Strategic OptionsStrategic Priorities
3 Streams of Assessment Data
Community Design Active TransportationParksRecreationSchoolsProducingProcessingDistributingRetailingPreparingEatin
Fitness DomainsFood Domains
 
Community Design Active TransportationParksRecreationSchoolsProducingProcessingDistributingRetailingPreparingEatin
Fitness DomainsFitness DomainsFood DomainsFood Domains
Collective Multicultural Vision/Community Goals
 
Collective Multicultural Vision/Community Goals
 
W.K Kellogg Foundation March 2008 Overview Page 2 of 
10
 
 
 
A comprehensive Food and Fitness assessment should consider several primary domains. A brief description of these domains for both “food” and “fitness” environments is offered below. Theextent to which each domain is assessed will vary according to the community vision. Forinstance, a vision for “fitness” that is focused primarily on recreation for children and familieswould not need to assess as carefully the “active transportation” or “land use” domains except asthey might affect recreational opportunities. 
Fitness Environment Goals
 Fitness goals of the initiative are to increase access to safe and inviting activity options andspaces for physical activity.
 
Options for Physical Activity:
Safe and inviting options for physical activity are determinedin large part by the physical spaces that are available (specified in the domains below). Theyare also determined by programmatic supports in these spaces such as recreation or physicaleducation programs, walking programs, active commuting programs. Accessibility of programs is influenced by factors such as cost, staffing, hours of operation, and culturalappropriateness.
 
Spaces for Physical Activity:
The accessibility of spaces for physical activity depends inlarge part of the number and diversity of these spaces, their location relative to where peoplelive, work or go to school, and the quality and safety of connections and routes todestinations. The quality of spaces for physical activity depends on: the appropriateness andgood repair of the facilities; aesthetic features such as good design, greenery and cleanliness;social factors such as absence of crime and other safety considerations; and perceptions of vibrancy. The spaces can be either built or natural.
Fitness Environment Domains
 These goals relate to four major domains which compose the fitness environment.
School
systems represent school environments including buildings, grounds, curricula,procedures and norms, as well as the accessibility of schools and the quality of routes to andfrom school.
Parks and Recreation
refers mainly to the accessibility and quality of parks,playgrounds, trails and natural open space, indoor recreation centers, gyms, pools and theprograms that encourage people to use them.
Active Transportation
pertains to the physicalarrangements and facilities that support walking, biking, public transit and other active means of transportation. Finally,
Community Design/Land Use
refers mainly to how the layout of thecommunity and the quality of places affects the accessibility and use of key destinations andopportunities for physical activity. All four of these domains are equally influenced by socialand environmental conditions beyond the built environment such as crime, climate, pollution,language, cultural beliefs and practices, race and poverty.
W.K Kellogg Foundation March 2008 Overview Page 3 of 
10
 

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