Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
8Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
GUIDELINES for HARVESTING, Storage Etc of Herbal Plants

GUIDELINES for HARVESTING, Storage Etc of Herbal Plants

Ratings: (0)|Views: 644 |Likes:
Published by luckyreads

More info:

Published by: luckyreads on Aug 13, 2008
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

01/24/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 AP-CF/Guidelines-GMCL & LAB/Final 
GUIDELINES FOR HARVESTING,STORAGE, DRYING AND GRADING &STRUCTURES REQUIRED FOR VALUEADDITION AND STORAGE
PREPARED FOR ANDHRA PRADESH FOREST DEPARTMENT
GMCL & LAB
JULY 2002
 
 AP-CF/Guidelines-GMCL & LAB/Final 
GUIDELINES FOR HARVESTING,STORAGE, DRYING AND GRADING &STRUCTURES REQUIRED FOR VALUEADDITION AND STORAGE
PREPARED FOR ANDHRA PRADESH FOREST DEPARTMENTContributors : G. RAJUDr. M.S. Sastry
GMCL & LAB
 
 AP-CF/Guidelines-GMCL & LAB/Final 
1
Value Addition to Raw drugs
In the Report on “Value Addition Techniques for commercially important medicinalplants of Andhra Pradesh including Pharmacoepial standards for 61 species ”, discussionon good storage practices, drying methods etc., have been provided.The following section discusses the value addition route to raw drugs.
Ayurvedic formulation
: This route can ensure a value addition in the range of 4-10times or more. Ayurvedic formulation can be made from the Ayurvedic Formulary of India, a standard reference for this purpose. The technology involved is simple. There area plethora of products and the consumer may have a problem in differentiating a goodquality product from a spurious one. The market survey reveals that the products are notformulated on any standards. Each company makes its own formulations and the claimsare not substantiated. Even if the enterprise was to make genuine products the challengewill be to build an image of quality. It is expected that the market for herbal products willgrow to about Rs 4000 crores by about 2002 AD. So while there is space for introducingformulations the challenge will be to build a brand image. Export of such products isanother avenue of opportunity. The table 1 gives an idea of market of different productsthat are produced from the species that we have identified.
Table:1 Prices of Sample Products
Sl. noplant nameprice ocrudedrugsingleproductPriceMixed productPrice1
 A. paniculata
20.00churanWith H.a*300.002
 M. pruriens
30.00churan70.00Vanari kalpa225.003
C. borivilianum
200.0Capsule240.00 per1004
 H. antidysentrica
13.00 200mlcontaining25gms40.005
G. sylvestre
10.00churan80.00* H.
antidysentrica
Source: Raju and Singh (1997) : Feasibility Study of a Non-timber forest produce enterprise.Working paper. Institute of Rural Management, Anand

Activity (8)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
zaheer786110 liked this
rori0072215 liked this
8urobouros liked this
Stephen Moore liked this
sonaln liked this
Swasmi Kamil liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->