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29. Stakeholder-Focused Training

29. Stakeholder-Focused Training

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Published by SRED Unlimited
Bruce Madole, CMC, explains how to find and involve key stakeholders in the SR&ED process.
Bruce Madole, CMC, explains how to find and involve key stakeholders in the SR&ED process.

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Categories:Business/Law
Published by: SRED Unlimited on Jan 24, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/27/2011

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Copyright 2010 Bruce Madole, CMCStakeholder-focused SR&ED Training
Stakeholder-focused SR&ED Training
There are plenty of good reasons to conduct regular SR&ED awareness trainingsessions. But everybody needs to know the same things.It helps your SR&ED program if you teach the key stakeholders something aboutthe information or response that you need, and why that information or that responsematters. If you’re going to deliver such training effectively, though, you need to broadenthe scope of who you’re training, and to narrow the scope of what each training setshould include. There are specific things that it is vital for a Vendor Manager or a ProjectManager to know, for instance. Their training should include those things. The samegoes for Senior Leadership, or the financial folks, or Human Resources. Tailor thetraining to your stakeholders to get better results.When I first started to develop and deliver SR&ED awareness training, Ideveloped a one-size-fits-all training deck that included topics from both the technicaland costing sides of the SR&ED program. I delivered that training to anyone andeveryone who wanted a SR&ED briefing (or who was forced to sit through it). The problem was that, at any given session, approximately half of the content was irrelevantto some of my audience.I could tell by the glazing of their eyes and their diminishing engagement whensome of the participants began “tuning out”, because they had nothing to do with theissues I was discussing. This was due to my own flawed assumptions – I was assumingthat the information was as necessary to them as it was to me. It wasn’t. Nobody in the
This document is the property of Bruce Madole, CMC, and is used by permission. All rights are reserved. The opinions expressed herein are personal, created for entertainmentand information purposes, and are not intended to be relied on in place of professional counsel or advice. No part of this document may be re-used, transmitted or re-transmittedwithout the express prior written consent of the author, who can be contacted at: brucemadole@sympatico.ca 
 
Copyright 2010 Bruce Madole, CMCStakeholder-focused SR&ED Trainingroom was seeking to become a SR&ED expert. They just wanted to learn how torecognize the kind of work that might qualify, and to understand what their obligationsand tasks were should they find themselves in a project where a SR&ED claim was possible. (Just tell me what I
need 
to do, they were pleading silently … and I let themdown.)Their learning goals were much more narrowly focused, and while nobodyactually cried (that I saw), I suspect that I was boring many of them nearly to tears.Mostly, when this happens, people tune out more than the most boring bits – they start tolose their grip on the wet soap of learning. Minds drift, and the relevant bits that followafter are lost in the fog of “what am I doing here, really?” and “When will he shut the hellup?” Net result, if you had asked someone what the session was about, they might havesaid, “It was something to do with SR&ED tax credits” Hardly the kind of learningdesigned to transform and energize an organization in support of a SR&ED program.Though I was passionate and persistent, over time I learned that SR&EDawareness training needs to be delivered frequently, in many different ways and inspecifically focused, small packages of task-specific learning.Mostly, people want to learn what it is I need them to do. To do … not to know.Therefore, while I do not neglect the “why” in the training sessions I deliver, I try to place a lot more emphasis on the what, the how, and the when of the SR&ED tasks thatdirectly affect their working lives. These are busy, busy people. Vendor Managers havecontracts and relationships to manage. Lawyers are lawyers, after all, and financial typeshave all of those numbers to deal with. Project Managers have projects to run, and
This document is the property of Bruce Madole, CMC, and is used by permission. All rights are reserved. The opinions expressed herein are personal, created for entertainmentand information purposes, and are not intended to be relied on in place of professional counsel or advice. No part of this document may be re-used, transmitted or re-transmittedwithout the express prior written consent of the author, who can be contacted at: brucemadole@sympatico.ca 

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