Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
1Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Computer games - lobbying at the highest level and with support from universities

Computer games - lobbying at the highest level and with support from universities

Ratings: (0)|Views: 54 |Likes:
Published by Lobuscher
Today, parents and teachers have to be very competent - even on the PC - in order not to succumb to the sirens of the (computer) industry. Economics and politics have formed an unholy alliance for the promotion of virtual games that inflict massive damage on children. The Christmas campaign advertises with the usual slogans of "educational opportunities" and "common family fun". However, the opposite has been proved: screen media reduce children's world of experience, promoting isolation and making it more difficult to acquire skills such as speaking, reading, and writing.
Today, parents and teachers have to be very competent - even on the PC - in order not to succumb to the sirens of the (computer) industry. Economics and politics have formed an unholy alliance for the promotion of virtual games that inflict massive damage on children. The Christmas campaign advertises with the usual slogans of "educational opportunities" and "common family fun". However, the opposite has been proved: screen media reduce children's world of experience, promoting isolation and making it more difficult to acquire skills such as speaking, reading, and writing.

More info:

Published by: Lobuscher on Jan 24, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as DOC, PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

07/22/2011

pdf

text

original

 
Computer games - lobbying at the highest leveland with support from universities
Killers of childhood under the Christmas tree
Government and industry in the frenzy of war games
By Sabine Schiffer, 6 December 2008:
Today, parents and teachers have to be very competent - even on the PC- in order not to succumb to the sirens of the (computer) industry.Economics and politics have formed an unholy alliance for the promotionof virtual games that inflict massive damage on children. The Christmascampaign advertises with the usual slogans of "educational opportunities"and "common family fun". However, the opposite has been proved: screenmedia reduce children's world of experience, promoting isolation andmaking it more difficult to acquire skills such as speaking, reading, andwriting.Computer gamers enjoy being instantly rewarded; this, however, reducesthe frustration tolerance which is needed for successful learning. In 2005,a study of the Ifo Institute showed that the availability of computers athome and their intensive use at school are not accompanied by better, butby poorer school performance in basic PISA [Program for InternationalStudent Assessment] competencies. They reduce the chance of a highschool recommendation, and they promote aggressive behavior[1] andforgetfulness.[2] Already in 2005, the U.S. Federal Trade Commission hadpointed out the aggressive marketing techniques of the entertainmentindustry.Their aim is to deceive parents and educators and to promote the sale of media products: harmless games like Sims and FIFA, or violent games likeWorld of Warcraft (online) and Call of Duty, which present a glorificationof war. Nintendo is primarily responsible for entry-level programs such asthe Mario series for Game Boys. In particular, the racing games alreadytrain the kids how to win at the expense of others; shooter and strategygames invent a defensive situation around the killing in order to calm theparents and to please the Defence Minister. Microsoft as a leadinghardware supplier is also a sponsor of the Federal Ministry for FamilyAffairs. The company initiates campaigns such as "Schools on the Net!",which provide for the computerization of schools and for a sustainablebrand loyalty. Or it advertizes successfully with supposed educationalofferings such as "Smart Mice", a computer program which is allegedlydesigned to promote the language skills of children in kindergarten.Minister von der Leyen is the patron of the "Smart Mice" program.Scientifically proven is the opposite, i.e. the continuous decrease of the
 
language skills among first-graders. However, the close cooperation of themonopolist with the Family Ministry is not the only amalgamation of thatindustry and political decision makers.
Lobbying at the highest level and with support from universities
 If you follow the cash flows of companies like Microsoft, Nintendo, andElectronic Arts, which are represented in the BIU [Federal Association of Interactive Entertainment Software], many things become clear. The BIUdrives a sophisticated PR strategy: self-financed studies, supported"scientists", contests and prizes, and good public relations coupled withlobbying at government level and in the Bundestag.The MPs Dorothee Bär (CSU) and Jörg Tauss (SPD) have made it theirtask to represent the interests of the BIU in Parliament – e.g., in 2007with the initiative "Promote valuable computer games, strengthen mediacompetence", which is primarily concerned with economic development."Protection of minors" and "media competence" are merely a fig leaf.Dorothee Bär's "commitment" does not only refer to "the discussion abouthow to deal with computer games", as she affirms on the homepage of the German Bundestag. She is also a substitute member of theBroadcasting Council of the Deutsche Welle and member of the Board of Trustees of the Federal Center for Political Education.[3] An expert hearingmade clear how she actually deals with the risks of computer games. Aftera conference in May 2007, Bär told the press that there was no scientificevidence of the relationship between playing computer games andviolence - immediately after experts had presented in detail precisely thisconnection! One of the scientists, Prof. Dr. Christian Pfeiffer, Director of the Criminological Research Institute of Lower Saxony, explained in detail,"The underlying data are ... the findings from our student survey in 2005,which revealed that every second boy at the age of 10 has experiencewith games rated 16+ or 18+ ... This alone shows that there is reasonenough for action. ...The producers of 'The Godfather', Electronic Arts, have issued a gameguide; on page 195 the following notice can be found, 'Especiallyentertaining and bloody killing of the enemy will bring you a a respectbonus.'" For particular murder plans the game suggests, "In 'Murder Order8' Oscar Zavarelle is to be killed. The guide says, 'I want Oscar Zavarelleto suffer. I've got my reasons. Don't kill him at once, but let him bleed todeath slowly. Like a pig ... The default is to shoot Oscar in the foot, thenin his shoulder, and finally, in his chin. Follow this plan to get an additionalrespect bonus.'Our review of 72 violence-oriented computer games has clearlydemonstrated: 'The Godfather' is not unique. The USK [German Self-Monitoring of Entertainment Software] has released many equally brutal
2
 
games for the market. This is not acceptable to us. Both empiricalevidence of media effects research and the basic values of our societysuggest that those games should be placed on the Index or even beprosecuted."[4] But Ms. Bär does not see any need for action. In hisrésumé, however, Christian Pfeiffer clearly demonstrates the connectionbetween intensive use of violent computer games, poor schoolperformance, and increased violence.Since 2000, SPD member Tauss from the constituency district Karlsruhe-country, has been the speaker of the Working Group for Education andResearch; for six years, he has been the chairman of his parliamentaryparty in the Subcommittee New Media. A specialist? As an author, Tausswrites for the journal
Politik und Kultur 
[5], a publication of the GermanCultural Council[6], which claims to be scientific and is dedicated to thestudy of PC games beyond the aspect of violence. Under the title"Computer Games – an Important Cultural and Economic Asset", Taussdeclares the virtual fighting games to be of a protective value that is,regrettably, "still missing the necessary public recognition".[7]The booming games industry in Germany has long fought for thisrecognition - with corresponding "expert reports" and with dirty tricks.And, in the summer of 2008, received for that the honorable reward of theGerman Cultural Council. The Federal Association of the Developers of Computer Games G.A.M.E. was admitted as a member in the section Filmand Audiovisual Media. For Olaf Zimmermann, managing director of theGerman Cultural Council, it is clear: "Art and games are no separateworlds. Computer games are a cultural asset. They must be treated assuch and deserve public support."[8]Thus, the orientation of the Federal Center for Political Education in thisarea is not surprising. As part of its self-declared mission to strengthendemocratic awareness, it publishes educational media guidelines andsuggests an open scientific debate. But here, too, industry is hiddenbehind: The graduated game researcher Christoph Klimmt (lecturer at theAcademy of Music and Drama in Hannover, advisory board member of theeJournal
GameScience
, and also a writer for
Politik und Kultur 
) is well-known for his very positive assessments of computer games. At theFederal Center, he can claim in an article, "Games give pleasure - and thisis important" [9] He himself likes to play "Battlefield 2" - a networkshooter game, in which a war in the Middle and Far East, underparticipation of the United States and the European Union, provides plentyof victims through the use of best military equipment.[10]Among other "scientists", Dr. Jörg Müller-Lietzkow is a co-editor of 
Politik und Kultur 
. He is also a welcome guest at the conference
Clash of Realities
at the Fachhochschule Köln. And this conference is made possibleby Electronic Arts.
3

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->