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Paradoxes of the Highest Science by Eliphas Levi

Paradoxes of the Highest Science by Eliphas Levi

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Published by: exxo66 on Jan 26, 2011
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01/27/2013

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THE PARADOXESOFTHE HIGHEST SCIENCE
IN WHICH THE MOST ADVANCED TRUTHS OF OCCULTISM ARE FOR THE FIRST TIME REVEALED (IN ORDERTO RECONCILE THE FUTURE DEVELOPMENTS OF SCIENCE AND PHILOSOPHY WITH THE ETERNALRELIGION)
Éliphas Lévi
With Footnotes by A Master of the Wisdom
originally published: Calcutta, Calcutta Central Press Co., 1883.
 Adyar, Madras Theosophical publishing house.[1922]
Scanned at sacred-texts.com, July 2004. John Bruno Hare, redactor. This text is in the publicdomain. These files may be used for any non-commercial purpose, provided this notice of attributionis left intact.
 
This was the first of Lévi's books to be translated into English. The original French version was published in 1856. This translation (by an unknown hand) was first published in 1883 by the Theosophical Society,and re-issued in 1922, with additional extensive footnotes by 'an Eminent Occultist' (herein, E.O.). Theidentity of E.O. is unknown, but it is believed from the style and views expressed that it was none other than Helena P. Blavatsky.
 
 
PREFACETo the 1922 Second Edition
MANY paths lead to the mountain-top, and many and diverse are the rifts in the Veil,through which glimpses may be obtained of the secret things of the Universe.The Abbé Louis Constant, better known by his
nom de plume
of ÉLIPHAS LÉVI, wasdoubtless a seer; but, though his studies were by no means confined to this, he saw onlythrough the medium of the kabala, the perfect sense of which is, now-a-days, hidden fromall
mere
kabalists, and his visions were consequently always imperfect and often muchdistorted and confused.Moreover, he was for a considerable portion of his career a Roman Catholic priest, and assuch had to keep terms, to a certain extent, with his church, and even later, when he wasunfrocked, he hesitated to shock the prejudices of the public, and never succeeded in evenwholly freeing
himself 
from the bias of his early clerical training. Consequently he notonly erred at times in good faith, not only constantly wrote ambiguously to avoid a directcollision with his ecclesiastical chiefs or current creeds, but he not unfrequently putforward Dogmas, which, taken in their obvious straightforward meanings, he certainly didnot
believe
--nay, I may say, certainly knew to be false. It is quite true that, in many of these latter cases, an undercurrent of irony may be discerned by those who know the truth,and that in all the enlightened can sufficiently read between the lines to avoidmisconceptions. But these defects, the ineradicable bias of his early training, the verynarrow standpoint from which he regarded occultism, and the limitations to freeexpression imposed on him by his position and temperament, seriously detract from thevalue of all Éliphas Lévi's writings.Still, he was an eloquent and learned man, and sufficiently advanced in occultism torender all he wrote on this subject interesting and more or less valuable to earneststudents of the Mysteries; and I have, therefore, thought that fellow-searchers for theHidden Truth would be well pleased to obtain access to some important and hithertounpublished writings of this great kabalist.Hence this translation, which, although absolutely without pretensions to literary merit,yet does, I hope and believe, everywhere fully and faithfully reproduce the
obvious
 meanings of the author, leaving, in all cases, where this is so in the original, an innermeaning discernible by those who KNOW. If in many places the language appearsconstrained and awkward, this has arisen from the necessity of preserving intact theexoteric and esoteric meanings, which our author so loved to combine in hisepigrammatic sentences.

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