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Hidden Worlds - Curatorial Project

Hidden Worlds - Curatorial Project

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Published by Marco Mancuso
The Hidden Worlds exhibition celebrates one of the most fascinating yet obscure territories of artistic audiovisual contemporary research: the relation between art and science. The video screening produces works that induce into a critical reflection on the existing relation between audiovisual contemporary artistic research (as regards to cinema, video and digital experiences) and applied sciences.
The Hidden Worlds exhibition celebrates one of the most fascinating yet obscure territories of artistic audiovisual contemporary research: the relation between art and science. The video screening produces works that induce into a critical reflection on the existing relation between audiovisual contemporary artistic research (as regards to cinema, video and digital experiences) and applied sciences.

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Categories:Types, Research, Science
Published by: Marco Mancuso on Jan 27, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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07/27/2012

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HIDDEN WORLDS
CONCEPT
Hidden Worlds
is an event like a reflective critique on the existing relationship between contemporary art andscience and their rapport with digital, electronic and analogical technologies, on the basis of mathematicalprocesses, numbers, logic abstractions and formulae.The
Hidden Worlds
event pays homage to one of the most stimulating and obscure territories of artisticaudiovisual contemporary research: that relationship between art and science. It induces the audience into acritical reflection on the existing relationship between contemporary audiovisuals and science in their rapportwith digital, electronic and analogical technologies, on the basis of mathematical processes, numbers, logicabstractions, and formulae.
Hidden Worlds
alternates its artists and avoids concentrating on a commonaesthetic, on a possible expressive language or used technologies, but rather proposes a panorama of specific systems for sensorial perception, for emotional mechanisms of “saturation” induces throughtechnical hybrids that expand the tradition of analogical experimental cinema and digital audiovisuals, moreso now than ever before. The project takes the spectator through beautiful “hidden worlds”, made intomonitors of the curiosity of artists and scientists for the expressive potential inside specific mathematicalprocesses, as well as physical, optical, chemical and electromagnetic phenomena.
Hidden Worlds
wants to be a testimony of a deep critical conviction: contemporary audiovisual art today,more than in the past, has the technological instruments and the ethical duty to confront itself with theempirical world around us and the “natural” technologies within it. Technologies that should be collected,observed and learned to control, just like man has shown that he can do with light, sound, images & space.
PROCEEDINGS
Hidden Worlds
is an art event structured in 4 phases:
an art exhibition
an encounter/lecture with artists (Evelina Domnitch & Dmitri Gelfand)
a video screening
3 live performance (Evelina Domnitch & Dmitri Gelfand ; Tez ; Semiconductor)
THE ART EXHIBITION
Carsten Nicolai: MilchVictoria Vesna: Blu MorphSachiko Kodama: Breathing ChaosEvelina Domnitch & Dmitry Gelfand: Camera LucidaRoiji Ikeda: FormulaTez: AnharmoniumCartsten Nicolai: RotaJoost Rekveld: #37
 
LECTURE"A MYRYAD OF VIBRANT PHENOMENA"THE OF AUDIOVISUAL ART-SCIENCE
In his On the Nature of Things,
Lucretius
denies any sort of creation, providence and original beatitude,stating that man broke free from his condition of ever present need through the use of techniques, which aretranspositions of nature. The gods do exist, although they neither created universe nor they care about men’s problems. Lucretius affirms that all our knowledge about nature shows us the universe as infinite, made by complex forms and composed by atoms. It follows natural laws, regardless of man’s needs, and can beexplained without resorting to deities.
Between 1899 and 1904 the german philosopher and biologist
Ernst Haeckel
published
Kunstformen der Natur (Art Forms of Nature)
, one of his best known works and a symbol of his zoological research andphilosophy, centered on the observation of marine micro-organisms as well of various natural species andanimals. The complete volume, consisting of over 100 lithographs, each accompanied by a short descriptivetext, obtained a great success even among the non-specialist public and among some Art Nouveau artists,committed to find new models to be used in the nascent industrial design and in architecture. In this regard,the volume lends itself to multiple assessments: as a zoological work depicting the evolution of organisms,as a work of art and as a work of aesthetics that focuses on seeing and perception as a way of knowing. Aesthetics, as the science of beauty, intent on understanding the nature in relation to art.The tables of the book, according to a geometric arrangement of the drawings, are based upon themicroscopic siliceous skeletons of radiolarians and diatoms, the umbrellas of the jellyfishes, the tentacles of sea anemones and spirals shells of molluscs. These illustrations depict therefore the law that regulatesnatural energy phenomena: the evolution, the fact that organisms are formed and transformed over time,according to genetic relationships of descent, from a common original type. In other words, by analyzing thetables of his rich classification, it is wonderful to see how nature is not only capable of spontaneouslycreating veritable art forms, but also of establishing a direct connection between a certain algebraic andgeometric aesthetics, starting from a fundamental unit/core and reaching a more complex entity, aconsequent evolutionary practice of adaptation.Moreover, one of the most currently fascinating mathematical theories is no doubt the theory of fractals:according to the definition of its recently passed away discoverer, the polish mathematician
BenoitMandelbrot
(1975), who started his researched form the fractal structure found out by french mathematicia
Gaston Julia
in 1920, fractals are geometrical figures characterized by a repetition to infinity of a samepattern on a more and more reduced scale. Nature is in fact filled with forms very similar to fractals, whichdon’t follow in any way any of the rules of Euclidean geometry. A coastline, the branches or the roots of atree, a cloud, the snowflakes, the zigzag lightning bolts and the leaf venation patterns: these are only a fewexamples of fractal forms spontaneously creating in nature. Among these ones there is the spiral, the fractal form par excellence. The procedural, generative, hieraticand evolutionary element can therefore be considered the key of this thought, turned to a modern“computational ecology: almost 40 years of study, analysis and research have passed between
AlanTuring
‘s revolutionary theories about morphogenesis (the capability of every living being to develop complexbodies starting from very simple elements, using self-assembling processes without an external guide),which followed those by bio-mathematician
Thompson D’Arcy
in his work
On the growth and form
(1917),and more recent studies (1980-1985) on genetic algorithms (a particular kind of evolutionary algorithmsutilizing mutation, selection and other recombination techniques in order to guarantee a certain number of 

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