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Squat-Interaction

Squat-Interaction

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Published by abguima

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Published by: abguima on Jan 28, 2011
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05/13/2015

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THE NAUTICAL INSTITUTE
 
HUMBERSIDE BRANCHSEMINAR
 
WEDNESDAY 13TH SEPTEMBER 1995
 
THE ROYAL HOTEL, HULLHUMBERSIDE
 
 
CONTENTS
 
Pages
 
INTERACTION
 
I. Dand ......................................................................................... 1 - 20
 
SHIP SQUAT
 
C.B. Barrass ............................................................................ 21 - 33
 
VOITH SCHNEIDER TUGS AND THEIR USES
 
M.S. Taylor................................................................................... 34-43
 
PRACTICAL ASPECTS OF SHIPHANDLING
 
J.Walker 
......................................................................................
44-57
 
Copyright: The Nautical Institute202 Lambeth RoadLondon SE1 7LQ
 
 
INTERACTION
 
 by Dr. Ian W. Dand, B.Sc., Ph.D, F.Eng, FRINA BMT SeaTech Ltd.
 
1.
 
INTRODUCTION
 
When ships come close to each other, one is apt to 'feel' the presence of theother to a greater or lesser degree. This may be manifest in a number of ways, ranging from involuntary speed changes to catastrophic (and againinvoluntary) course changes which may lead to collision, or grounding.
 
Of course, it is wise to avoid these sudden, unexpected occurrences by leaving plenty of sea room between one ship and another. But this is not always possible : ships in a long narrow approach channel have to pass each other and some (tugs and pilot launches for example), by the very nature of their work, must go in close to the ships they are attending.
 
The hydrodynamic phenomenon which causes ships in close proximity toexhibit this behaviour is known as interaction and its causes and effects are thesubject of this paper.
 
First we look at the causes, then give some practical aspects which inclinetoward operations in shallow or confined waters, and finally consider somefamous examples of interaction which themselves have spurred research intothis important and fascinating topic.
 
2.
WHAT CAUSES INTERACTION
?
 
Interaction at sea has a number of resonances with similar effects on land.The sway that is felt when a car passes (or is passed by) a large lorry on amotorway, the suction created by a high speed train passing through a station(giving rise to the yellow warning lines painted on platforms) and groundeffect experienced by aircraft when taking off or landing are all examples.Indeed they all arise from the same basic fluid dynamic cause, although withships the phenomenon is more insidious and can strike unexpectedly.
 
In the marine world, interaction is caused when the pressure fields aroundships interact. All ships are in a state of balance in the water, held in positionat rest by hydrostatic pressures to which are added dynamic pressures whenthe ship begins to move. Dynamic pressures are those which cause (andindeed are represented by) the familiar diverging and transverse wave systemsgenerated by a ship moving calm water.
 

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