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Checking-in to the State of Foursquare

Checking-in to the State of Foursquare

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Published by Brian Solis
Last year at SXSW, Foursquare founder Dennis Crowley joined Frank Eliason (previously @comcastcares), Altimeter Group’s Jeremiah Owyang and me on stage to discuss the shifting landscape of social engagement. While I focused on the sociology of engagement and the impact it is having on culture and society, I also sought to balance the conversation by demonstrating the impact of digital actions and interaction between people and businesses.
Last year at SXSW, Foursquare founder Dennis Crowley joined Frank Eliason (previously @comcastcares), Altimeter Group’s Jeremiah Owyang and me on stage to discuss the shifting landscape of social engagement. While I focused on the sociology of engagement and the impact it is having on culture and society, I also sought to balance the conversation by demonstrating the impact of digital actions and interaction between people and businesses.

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Published by: Brian Solis on Jan 28, 2011
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Checking-in to the State of Foursquare
By Brian Solis, blogger at  BrianSolis.comand principal of  FutureWorks, Author of the highly  acclaimed book on social business 
Last year at SXSW,Foursquare founder Dennis Crowley joined Frank Eliason (previously @comcastcares), Altimeter Group’s Jeremiah Owyang and me on stage to discuss the shiftinglandscape of social engagement. While I focused on the sociology of engagement and the impact itis having on culture and society, I also sought to balance the conversation by demonstrating theimpact of digital actions and interaction between people and businesses.Whether intentional or not, Crowley and team unlocked the elusive gates that separated the last mileof engagement between local businesses and their customers and prospective patrons. The risinggeneration of social consumers embraced geo-location services to share physical experiences,connect with their social graph in the real world and also earn rewards for their check-ins, which israpidly becoming a powerful form of peer-to-peer endorsements and recommendations. Crowley,quite literally gamed the system that was once solely controlled by giants such as the Yellow Pages,Google and Yelp. The Foursquare team bridged the gap between people and places both online andoffline.Later in the year, we caught up again for a cover story I wrote for  
magazine.We discussed how Foursquare redefined the role of the patron and the relationship betweenbusinesses and customers.“The network started to take on a life of its own,” Crowley said in the interview for Entrepreneur.“Foursquare gave everyday people, venues and local merchants a voice. It opened the doors for businesses to see a whole new way of seeing their customer.”
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis
 
In the Game of Foursquare, What’s the Score?
Foursquare’s rapid rise from New York startup to media darling is quite remarkable. If you judge theservice by its badge, or shall we say badges, you might miss the bigger picture. The essence of Foursquare is powered by its community. In this mobile Utopia, people earn positions of prominenceby exploring and improving the experiences of other explorers. It’s a form of social hierarchy that’salluring and rewarding. For a more recent example, it’s not unlike the fledgling blog darlingQuora.  The ties that bind its users are woven through social ties and recognition that’s earned throughparticipation and contribution.Foursquare continues to evolve and the team recently released an infographicthat visualized collective achievements and user behavior. To make it easier to consume and also appreciate itsprogress, let’s review some key milestones.In 2010, Foursquare experienced 3,400-percent growth over 2009, reaching 6,000,000 users todate.This year, Foursquare received over 380 million check-ins.The largest swarm to date is the Rally to Restore Sanity, which saw over 35,000 check-ins onOctober 30th, 2010.
A Day in the Life
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis
 
The team also revealed a “day in the life” of the typical Foursquare user.Most people check-in to eateries, gaining momentum at 8 a.m. every day and thinning out just after midnight.Check-ins to work or the office also follow a similar pattern. Work days typically seem to see thegreatest volume of check-ins between 7 – 8 a.m. continuing to midnight.Retail therapy is in session all day, racking up check-ins around 10 a.m. and winding down shortlybefore 10 p.m.A few hotels have done well in the luring of check-ins.
The top hotels, in order, include:
1. Ace Hotel, New York2. Wynn Hotel & Casino, Las Vegas3. The St. Regis, San Francisco
(cc) Brian Solis,www.briansolis.com- Twitter, @briansolis

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