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Profile Publications No 42 North American FJ Fury

Profile Publications No 42 North American FJ Fury

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Published by Luke Goh
Profile Publications No 42 North American FJ Fury
Profile Publications No 42 North American FJ Fury

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Published by: Luke Goh on Jan 29, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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12/06/2012

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NORTHAMERICAN
FJ-3
FURY'
No.
135978
of
VF-154.
 
North_Arnerican
FJ-3Mof
V,F-142
from
U.,S.,S.
Hornet.
Note
the
four-station
wing,
refirclling
probe
and
wing
fences.
Photo
takenover Japan, 22nd
January
1957.
-
(Photo:
U.S. Nalry)
The
evolution of
naval
aircraft
has
for nore
than
fifty
yearsbeen
a
particularly
exacting
exercise,a
commit-ment
rendered
infinitely
more dimcult
by
the
econo-
mics
of
relativelysmall
production
orders.
Thus
byforce
of
circumstances
it
has
been
found
more
expedi-
ent
to
adapt
an
existing
or
projected
land-based
aircraft
design
for
the
task
of
deck
operation,
with
the
resultthat
with
so
muchparaphernaliaappended
the
naval
combat
aircraft
has
commenced
life
with
an
inbred
inferiority
whencompared
with
itsdry-footed
contemporaries.
Only
in
the
years
following
W.W.[
have
high
performance
combat
aircraft
been
evolved
with
deck
operation of flrst
importance
in
theOpera-
tional
Requirement;
this
has undoubtedlyfollowedthe trend
of
uprating the
fleet
carrier
to
capital
ship
status.
One
of
the
first
examples
of
putting
"the
horse
before
the
cart"
wasthe
North
American FJ-Series
of
naval
jet
fighters.
Of
course
the
world
recognisestheexcellence
of
thewell-known
F-86
Sabre
(see
Profle
No.
2),
yet
it
is
perhaps
an
obscure
fact that
the
NA-140
(XP-86)
design
stemmed
from
the
NA
134,
designed
to
a U.S.
Navy
requirement
of
1945.
The
North
American
NA-l34
project
designationcovered the
design
and
construction of
threestraight-winged
fighter
prototypes,ordered
by the U.S.Navy
on
lst
January
1945.
Developed
from
this
was
the
NA-140
for
an
Air
Force
flghter,originally
intended
to
havestraight wings
but,
following
intensiveexamination
of
sequestrated
German
research
data on
sweptwings,was destined
to materialise
as
the
famous
F-86
Sabre.
Deck
landing
speeds
required
by
Navy
fighters
eliminated the
consideration
of
a
swept
wing
on
the
NA-134
design
at
that time
and
the
project
went
ahead
with
straight wings,
to
become
the
North
American
XFJ-I.
Unlike
current fighters
(e.g.P-59
and P-80)
in
service
with
or in
production
for
the
U.S.A.F.,
the
new naval
aircraft
wasdesigned
around
the
axial
flow
General
Electric
J-35
which
made
possiblethe
straight-throughairflow from
nose
to tail
without
complications
of
wing-root
or
other
lateral
types
of
intakes.
Thus whileefforts continued
to
developan efficientswept
wing
for
the
XP-86
and extend
its
"on
board"
time,
the
Navy
XFJ-ls
commenced
manufacture
early
in
1946
and
first
flew
on
27th Novemberthat
year-about
ten months
ahead
of
the
XP-86.
With
3,820
pounds
thrust
from
the
J35-GE-2engine,
the
first
of
the
threeprototypes
(39053-
39055)achieved
a maximum
speed
of
542
m.p.h.
at
16,000
feet,
a
service
ceiling
of
47,400
feet
and
an
initial
climb
rate
of
4,690
feet/minute.
As
a
matter
of
passinginterest
these
figures wereextremelyclose
to
those
of
the
British
de
Havilland
Vampire
I
which had
performed
the
world's
first
deck landing
by a
jetaircraft
in
late
1945
and which
entered
naval
service
during
1948.
Flight trials
on
the three XFJ-1s
continued
for
almost
a
year,beingaccepted
by theU.S. Navy
duringSeptember1947.
Production
had
by
then
already
started,
the Navy
havingplaced
a
contract
for
100
FJ-ls
as
far
back
as
28th
May
1945.
Deliveriesunder
this contract
commenced
in
earlyautumn
1947
from
the
Los
Angeles
plant
and
passed
to
Navy
Squadron
VF-5A
at
San
Diegoon
18th
November
that
year.
In
the
course
of
two
months
this
squadron,under Com-mander
Evan
("Pete")
Aurand,
completed
about
200
The
unarnted
firstprototypeXFJ-1,39053.(Photo:Courtesy
Norrh
American
Aviarion
Inc,)

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