Welcome to Scribd. Sign in or start your free trial to enjoy unlimited e-books, audiobooks & documents.Find out more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Look up keyword
Like this
4Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
THE NEW PERSUADERS: An international ranking of soft power

THE NEW PERSUADERS: An international ranking of soft power

Ratings:
(0)
|Views: 435|Likes:
Published by Markoff Chaney
The future of Britain’s global role stands at a precarious juncture. External and internal challenges alike are weighing on the government’s capacity to wield influence abroad. Externally, the global status quo is rapidly changing as the centre of economic and political power continues to drift from West to East. At home, the state of Britain’s public finances demands a considerable retrenchment of Government spending. Remaining influential abroad in this context will require Britain to recognise its ‘soft power’ advantages, and consider how to leverage them effectively.
The future of Britain’s global role stands at a precarious juncture. External and internal challenges alike are weighing on the government’s capacity to wield influence abroad. Externally, the global status quo is rapidly changing as the centre of economic and political power continues to drift from West to East. At home, the state of Britain’s public finances demands a considerable retrenchment of Government spending. Remaining influential abroad in this context will require Britain to recognise its ‘soft power’ advantages, and consider how to leverage them effectively.

More info:

Published by: Markoff Chaney on Jan 29, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

03/20/2013

pdf

text

original

 
 
THE NEW PERSUADERS:
 
 An international ranking of soft power 
Jonathan McClory
 
 
 1
The future of British diplomacy
The future of Britain’s global role stands at a precarious juncture. External and internal challenges alikeare weighing on the government’s capacity to wield influence abroad. Externally, the global status quois rapidly changing as the centre of economic and political power continues to drift from West to East.At home, the state of Britain’s public finances demands a considerable retrenchment of Governmentspending. Remaining influential abroad in this context will require Britain to recognise its ‘soft power’advantages, and consider how to leverage them effectively.In an effort to map the world’s soft power landscape, the Institute for Government, working inpartnership with
Monocle
, developed a Soft Power Index.
Monocle,
a monthly periodical, has a strongtrack-record of covering soft power issues in international affairs. With a global network ofcorrespondents,
Monocle
provided an on-the-ground perspective to compliment our data-heavyapproach.Soft power, unlike military hardware or foreign exchange reserves, is not a commodity that a countrycan store up and deploy at will in pursuit of specific objectives. By its very nature, soft power is arelative and intangible concept that is inherently difficult to quantify. The relational nature of softpower, where the perceptions of one country may vary substantially from another, also makes cross-national comparison difficult. What is loved in Paris might repel in Riyadh. Recognising this challenge,our index combines a wide range of objective and subjective measures of the core constituentcomponents of soft power to create a composite index that, we believe, captures the overall softpower capability of our sample of countries more accurately than has ever been done before.
Soft power
In international politics, influence is power.
1
Soft power, coined twenty years ago by Joseph Nye, is theability of a state to influence the actions of another through persuasion or attraction, rather thancoercion.
2
As Nye has previously argued, power can be wielded in three ways: threat of force (stick),inducement of payments (carrot) or shaping the preferences of others.
3
Two recent trends have made soft power more critical to the UK’s approach to foreign policy. Alongwith most developed economies, the UK is facing significant cuts to public spending, which meansthere are advantages in leveraging all available resources for influence. Under the ComprehensiveSpending Review, the Foreign and Commonwealth Office will see its budget fall by 24 per cent in realterms over the five-year period covering the CSR.Soft power eschews thetraditional foreign policy implements of carrot and stick, relying instead on the attractiveness of anation’s institutions, culture, politics and foreign policy, to shape the preferences of others.
4
The second trend is the changing nature of global affairs, which have become – and will continue to be– more suited to soft power mechanisms. The use of soft power is not new, but the conditions forIn addition to diplomatic cuts, the Ministry ofDefence is facing cuts near to 10 per cent of total spending. Taken together, Britain’s sources oftraditional international influence are looking diminished. With fewer hard power and diplomaticresources to deploy, soft power tools – especially those not financed by the government – will need tobe employed with more regularity and intelligence.
1
Willson, E. III (2008) “Hard Power, Soft Power, Smart Power”, Annals of the American Academy of Politicaland Social Sciences, 616, March, pp. 110-124
2
Nye, J. (1990) Bound to lead: The changing nature of American power. New York: Basic Books
3
Nye, J. (2008) “Public Diplomacy and Soft Power”,
 Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
, 616, March, pp. 94-109
4
Parker, G. and Barker, A. (2010) “Foreign Office to shed jobs and sites”, Financial Times, 18 November
 
 2
projecting it have transformed dramatically in recent years.
5
Soft power transcends the elitism ofclassic diplomacy by putting the increasingly well-informed global public into play. In today’snetworked world of instant information, global publics are smarter, more engaged and more activethan ever.
6
To date, the new Government has not made soft power a priority in terms of resource allocation. Twoof Britain’s key public diplomacy assets, The British Council and BBC World Service, were handedchallenging five year spending settlements, which will not only place huge constraints on theirresources, but fundamentally alter their funding structures. From 2014 The BBC World Service will nolonger receive an annual FCO grant, but be funded by BBC licence fee payers. The British Council, whichpromotes British culture abroad, will see its FCO grant fall by 18 per cent, which will mean significantcuts for frontline programmes across the world. But while Britain’s soft power infrastructure weathersthe current fiscal storm, emerging powers are investing in image projection.With more citizens serving as both independent observers as well as active participants ininternational politics, rapid swings in public opinion are more frequent and potentially more serious. Asa result, the public diplomacy initiatives of today need to reach larger, more sceptical publics. And withsoft power serving as the primary currency of public diplomacy, the health of Britain’s soft powerinfrastructure is more relevant than ever. But it must be said, with new opportunities come newchallenges.Demonstrating a heightened awareness of soft power’s potential for wielding influence abroad, risingglobal players are mobilising resources accordingly. China’s soft power advances reflect this widertrend and the shifting diplomatic balance. For example, China has launched a global charm offensivespearheaded by a network of Confucius Institutes, educational outposts designed to promote Chineselanguage and culture. In just under six years, China has established 320 institutes around the world.And this year alone a further $8.9 billion has been invested in ‘external publicity work’ by the Chinesestate.
7
Likewise, Turkey’s shift from a traditional reliance on hard power, to a more engaging, softer approachin its foreign affairs has been well documented. Domestically, Turkey has responded to its EU candidatecountry status with an ambitious reform agenda. 
8
Internationally, Turkish foreign policy has evolvedaccording to three pillars: emphasising friendly
relations with
immediate
neighbours, utilising
its
 
unique location which straddles East and West, and treating its
Ottoman heritage as a foreign policyasset
.
The major goal
of Turkey’s foreign policy approach is to transform
into a strong regional
– andeven global –
actor through the exercise of soft power
.
9
Turkey’s transformation was recognised in November when President Abdullah G
ü
l was awarded the2010 Chatham House Prize in recognition of his role in Turkey’s increasing positive influence on globalpolitics. Whether new approaches to diplomacy and global public engagement will shift the balance ofpower is unclear, but our soft power index aims to provide a benchmark of global soft power capabilityat a potentially crucial tipping point.
5
Nye, J. (2008) “Public Diplomacy and Soft Power”,
 Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science
, 616, March, p. 96
6
Van Staden, A. (2005) “Power and legitimacy: The quest for order in a unipolar world”,
Clingendael Diplomacy Papers
, April
7
Shambaugh, D. (2010) “China Flexes its Soft Power”,
International Herald Tribune
, 7 June
8
 
Oğuzlu, T
. (2007) 'Soft power in Turkish foreign policy',
 Australian Journal of International Affairs
,61 (1), pp. 81-97
9
D
ü
zgit, S. and Tocci, N. (2009) “Transforming Turkish Foreign Policy: The Quest for Regional Leadership andEuropeanisation”, Brussells: Centre for European Policy Studies

Activity (4)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
1 thousand reads
esevin liked this
Enzo Echenique liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
scribd
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->