Welcome to Scribd, the world's digital library. Read, publish, and share books and documents. See more
Download
Standard view
Full view
of .
Save to My Library
Look up keyword
Like this
7Activity
0 of .
Results for:
No results containing your search query
P. 1
Mapping the Healing Journey

Mapping the Healing Journey

Ratings: (0)|Views: 176 |Likes:
This ground-breaking participatory research with key Aboriginal First Nations across Canada and Indigenous healers and community development practitioners in Canada and the USA is fundamental reading for anyone working in addressing addictions or supporting community development in Indigenous Communities.
In our consultations with six partner communities, and drawing on knowledge and experience from many other communities and Indigenous healers it became clear that the community healing process also seems to go through distinct stages or cycles. Four distinct stages were identified and described.
Stage 1: The Journey Begins (Thawing from the long winter)
Stage 2: Gathering Momentum (Spring)
Stage 3: Hitting the Wall (Summer)
Stage 4: From Healing to Transformation (Fall)
Also included are Indigenous definitions healing, healing strategies, models and recommendations.
This ground-breaking participatory research with key Aboriginal First Nations across Canada and Indigenous healers and community development practitioners in Canada and the USA is fundamental reading for anyone working in addressing addictions or supporting community development in Indigenous Communities.
In our consultations with six partner communities, and drawing on knowledge and experience from many other communities and Indigenous healers it became clear that the community healing process also seems to go through distinct stages or cycles. Four distinct stages were identified and described.
Stage 1: The Journey Begins (Thawing from the long winter)
Stage 2: Gathering Momentum (Spring)
Stage 3: Hitting the Wall (Summer)
Stage 4: From Healing to Transformation (Fall)
Also included are Indigenous definitions healing, healing strategies, models and recommendations.

More info:

Categories:Types, Research
Published by: Four Worlds International Institute (FWII) on Jan 30, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

Availability:

Read on Scribd mobile: iPhone, iPad and Android.
download as PDF, TXT or read online from Scribd
See more
See less

12/26/2011

pdf

text

original

 
 
MAPPING THE HEALING JOURNEY
The final report of a First Nation Research Project on Healing in Canadian Aboriginal Communities 
Four Worlds International InstituteP.O. Box 75028, Surrey British Columbia, V4A0B14worlds@uleth.cawww.fwii.net1-604-542-8991
 Research and Writing
Phil Lane, Jr.Michael BoppJudie BoppJulian Norris
Funding
Aboriginal Corrections Policy UnitSolicitor General Canada
 
The Aboriginal Healing FoundationOttawa, Ontario
 
 
 
Acknowledgements
 We are particularly indebted to Mr. Ed Buller, Director of the Aboriginal Corrections Policy Unity and Dr. GailValaskakis, Director of Research at the Aboriginal Healing Foundation, who guided and supported our work atevery stage.A tremendous debt of gratitude is owed to the six Canadian Aboriginal communities who so generouslyparticipated in intense community-based consultations and in a National Consultative Meeting held in Winnipeg.These communities (listed in alphabetical order) are:
 
Eskasoni First Nation on Cape Breton Island, Nova Scotia
 
Esketemc First Nation, otherwise known as Alkali Lake, British Columbia
 
Hollow Water First Nation in south-eastern Manitoba
 
Mnjikaning First Nation at Rama, Ontario
 
Squamish First Nation near Vancouver, British Columbia
 
Waywayseecappo First Nation in south-western ManitobaIn each of these communities, key healing personnel and community volunteers gave many hours and in somecases, days of their time grappling with very challenging and difficult questions related to the ongoing healingwork in their communities and to the requirements of the road ahead, leading to sustainable well-being andprosperity.We are also extremely grateful to the participants of the National Consultative Meeting, held in Winnipeg,January 14-15, 2002 for their thoughtful and energetic review of the research findings and for the additional,often profound insights, they added to our understanding of the patterns that emerged from the hundreds ofpages of community data that were collected.The participants in that two-day meeting were as follows.
Adeline BrownGwen HarryRobert BakerWalter WastesicootPennie Williams-LouttitDan HighwayJonathan EllerbyDan BenoitLoretta BayerSandra De LarondeLouise ChippawayBrenda M. GouletWilma Jean SimonChristine MetallicShirley MorrisJoan MolloyGrace SchedlerLoretta BoulardPercy BirdPhyllis ChelseaIvy ChelseaMyrtle MentuckGeorgaline BeaulieuAndy MecasIvan WilliamsLena BushieDonna SmithNelson ContoisCarl FlettE. Gordon McGillivaryJ. T. TurnerNorma Spence
Also, during the course of conceptualizing and carrying out this study, a number of key professionals in theAboriginal healing field contributed significantly to our understanding of the patterns that were uncovered in thecommunity studies and the literature review. Collectively, their work helped us enormously as we struggled tomake sense of the complex and often seemingly contradictory themes and patterns we found. They are:

Activity (7)

You've already reviewed this. Edit your review.
1 hundred reads
Tony Estrada liked this
pisicuza liked this
GracefulGoddess liked this
mollocate liked this
virendhemre liked this
virendhemre liked this

You're Reading a Free Preview

Download
/*********** DO NOT ALTER ANYTHING BELOW THIS LINE ! ************/ var s_code=s.t();if(s_code)document.write(s_code)//-->