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February Community News

February Community News

Ratings: (0)|Views: 1,294|Likes:
Inside:
*Pete Coors
*New restaurant
*Aspen Skiing Co.
*DU poets
*Dating violence recognition
*Concussions law
Inside:
*Pete Coors
*New restaurant
*Aspen Skiing Co.
*DU poets
*Dating violence recognition
*Concussions law

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Published by: University of Denver on Feb 02, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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04/09/2012

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 Pete Coors
 New restaurant
  Aspen Skiing Co.
 DU poets
 Dating violencerecognition
 Concussions law
Inside
02.2011
[
 
CAMPUS|NEIGHBORHOOD LIFE|RESEARCH ARTS|EVENTS|PEOPLE 
]
   G  e   t   t  y   I  m  a  g  e  s
A presidential performance
When President Barack Obama delivered his State of the Union address onJan. 25, he singled out Morgridge College of Education alumna Kristin Waters(PhD ’06) for her work to turn around Denver’s failing Bruce Randolph Schoolas its principal from 2005–09. “Three years ago, it was rated one of the worstschools in Colorado … But last May, 97 percent of the seniors received theirdiploma,” Obama said. “Most will be the first in their families to go to college. And after the first year of the school’s transformation, the principal who madeit possible wiped away tears when a student said ‘Thank you, Ms. Waters, forshowing that we are smart and we can make it.’” Waters now serves as aninstructional superintendent with Denver Public Schools.>>Read more about Waters at www.du.edu/today
 S  u t   t   e s  t   o c k  
 
Love for charity 
Love Grown Foods granolarecently brought 375 bags of love — in the form of granola, of course — and served breakfast to children at Denver’s RonaldMcDonald House. Run byMaddy D’Amato (BA ’08) and Alex Hasulak (BSBA ’08), thecompany donated one bag for each new fan and follower onFacebook and Twitter. “Duringhard times, we often neglectourselves, and finding healthy,delicious foods that are easy to grab-and-go and filling is noteasy. We are thrilled to leaveloads of love for all the familiesand children,” D’Amato andHasulak wrote on their blog, www.lovegrownfoods.com/blog.
 
 www.du.edu/today
Volume 34, Number 6
Interim Vice Chancellor for University Communications
Jim Berscheidt
Editorial Director 
Chelsey Baker-Hauck (BA ’96)
Managing Editor 
Kathryn Mayer (BA ’07, MLS ’10)
 Art Director 
Craig Korn, VeggieGraphics
Community News
is published monthly by theUniversity of Denver, University Communications,2199 S. University Blvd., Denver, CO 80208-4816.The University of Denver is an EEO/AA institution.
Contact
Community News
at 303-871-4312or tips@du.eduTo receive an e-mail notice upon thepublication of 
Community News
, contact uswith your name and e-mail address.
UNIVERSITY OF DENVER
 
[ ]
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States where DU alumni reside 1. Colorado2. California3. Texas4. Illinois5. New York6. Florida7. Washington8. Arizona9. Massachusetts10. Minnesota
Colorado native, DU alum Pete Coors namedCitizen of the West 
The National Western Stock Show recently honored DU alum-nus Pete Coors (MBA ’79) as its 2011 Citizen o the West. With a amily history dating back to beore Colorado’s statehood,Coors is a ourth generation Coloradan and the second in his amily toreceive the honor. William Coors, Pete’s uncle and a DU HonoraryLie Trustee, received the honor in 1992.The award is given annually by National Western to individuals who “embody the spirit and determination o the western pioneer and who are committed to perpetuating the West’s agricultural heri- tage and ideals.”“Without Pete, the Rockies and Coors Field would not be here.Our state, region and country are better because o Pete Coors and the leadership he has pro- vided,” said National Western Stock Show Chairman Jerry McMorris when he announced Coorsas the recipient. “He is a true Citizen o the West.”This is the second year in a row the Citizen o the West has had a DU tie. Last year, RebeccaLove Kourlis, executive director o DU’s Institute or the Advancement o the American Legal Sys- tem, and her husband Tom, a DU alumnus, received the award.Former DU Chancellor Dan Ritchie received the honor in 1998.The awardees are selected by a committee o community leaders. Proceeds rom the dinner honoring Coors, held Jan. 10, support 74 scholarships awarded by the National Western Scholar-ship Trust.
 —Kim DeVigil
Skew infuses quick-casual Asian cuisine withfour-star style
Skew — a new restaurant that seeks to turn steak, chicken, pork and seafood into “art on astick” — opened its doors Jan. 10 in a space vacated by Stick-e-Star in April 2010.The new eatery at 2070 S. University Blvd. offers 41 grilled or fried “skews” for eat-in or  take-out.“The food that we do here is the same food you’d get in a four- or five-star restaurant,but I do it at a much lower price and a lot faster than a full-service restaurant,” says WatcharatPhairatphiboon, one of the six owners of the family restaurant. “It’s quick casual.”Choices range from the chicken yakitori skew for $3.75 and the Tsukune meatball skew for $4 to a spicy Newport shrimp skew that melds tiger shrimp with onions, peppers and a “Newport”sauce of ginger, scallions and sake for $6.75.Fried skew offerings include items such as kneaded pork with onions, scallions, nori and katsucurry sauce for $4.75 or Philly Katsu, a Panko-breaded mozzarella-stuffed Angus steak with onions, tri-color peppers and black pepper sauce for $5.50.Side dishes include sticky rice, noodle salad and “volcanic edamame.” Vegetarians can pick  from crispy organic tofu to grilled asparagus, zucchini and shiitake mushrooms.Even the desserts are exotic, with a mango and sticky rice parfait made of infused coconutsticky rice with fresh mangos and coconut gelato ice cream for $5.“I’ve been a student here so I know how sensitive people are to price,” Phairatphiboon says.“If you want people to try a new type of cuisine or food, you have to make the price low enough for people to try it.”Skew offers a full bar of beer, wine, sake, and fruit-inspired or muddled martinis among a rangeof exotic beverages. One concoction — the $12 Volcano — even claims to be strong enough per serving to “quench” a party of four.Skew is open daily from 11 a.m.–midnight.
 —Richard Chapman
Pioneers Top Ten
 
3
Professor revives child near death in Africa
Think you have a good story about your winter break? Phil Tedeschi sure does.Tedeschi, a clinical associate proessor in theUniversity o Denver Graduate School o Social Work,spent two weeks in December in east Arica as part o a class he teaches called Social Work in Kenya: Context,Empowerment, and Sustainability. The class exposesstudents to the diculties in the region and challenges them to develop ways to support the people there.The day beore the class was to return to theUnited States, Tedeschi and students spent a little timeexperiencing the beaches o the Indian Ocean.“There were hundreds o people just lounging andenjoying the warm waters,” Tedeschi says.But on this day, the tide was low — low enough that people could walk several hundred yards into theocean. In act, locals call it “the drowning tide” becauseit oten orms small but relatively deep pools o water  that are dicult to see. A ew minutes ater arriving, a colleague alerted Tedeschi that there had been an accident. Tedeschi noticed a group o men pulling a sur board witha small boy on it, about 6 years old, ace down and not moving.“I immediately went over to see what was going on. I turned the boy over and his eyes were open and xed, he wasn’t breathing and he had oamaround his mouth and nose,” Tedeschi says. “But I did notice he had a good heartbeat.”Tedeschi, who’s trained as a wilderness emergency medical technician, quickly blew a rescue breath into the boy and turned him to the side.“That’s when he expelled a lot o water, so I put him on his back and gave him another breath and again he expelled more water,” Tedeschi says.“He had a dazed look or about 30 seconds and then let out a loud scream and began crying. That’s when I knew he was going to be OK.”Tedeschi says he never saw or met the boy’s parents.“I don’t think they knew what to do or him. The men who brought the boy to shore were going to claim him as dead,” Tedeschi says. And more good news: Tedeschi is now communicating with a Kenyan organization he works with as part o the social work class to start emergencymedical and CPR training there.“I think that’s something that may help,” Tedeschi says.
 —Doug McPherson
Dazbog joins coffee competition with new store on South Downing
Competition or the coee dollar intensied over the holidays when a new Dazbog coeeshop quietly opened Dec. 27 in the 2400 block o South Downing Street.The bright, airy bean-and-brew store occupies a one-story oce building on the west side o Downing just north o Porter Adventist Hospital.“People who come in say they’re nally glad we’re open,” said ranchise holder KeithDarr, a ormer sotware consultant and real estate x-and-fipper. “Most o the people rom theneighborhood love the location.”So do Dazbog ounders Anatoly and Leonid Yua, who dropped into the store Jan. 3 tomake sure everything in the shop — the company’s 30th — was perking along properly.“It’s a great neighborhood store,” Leonid Yua says, noting that the shop expects to draw rom the University neighborhood to the east and the Porter Hospital community in addition to theUniversity o Denver.“I like the appearance and the openness,” Yua said. “It has room and a good eel. It’s a goodplace to study and hang out.”There’s ree WiFi and Darr added parking in the back or about 11 cars.In 1996, the Yua brothers started Dazbog — which is a greeting that expresses a wish or good ortune — and have expanded the chain to vestates since then. The company sells about a dozen locally roasted specialty and organic coee blends plus pastries and teas. The new store at 2450 S.Downing St. will be open daily rom 6 a.m.–8 p.m.
 —Richard Chapman
   R   i  c   h  a  r   d   C   h  a  p  m  a  n
i   l    e d  e s  c i   

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