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Table Of Contents

AUTHOR’S NOTE
INTRODUCTION
Early Notions of Flying
The Cherokee 140 and the Basics
Lessons
Cross-Country
The New War in Asia
Laredo
The T-41
The T-37
The Spin
The T-38
Fingertip Formation
Wings
Survival Training
The F-4
First Assignment: Japan and Korea
Last Flights
War Fever or Flying Fever?
T-33 Air-to-Ground Gunnery
The OV-10
On to Southeast Asia
Nakhon Phanom
Instructing in War
Another Letter Home
Bangkok and Prairie Fire
The Speaker on the Wall
End of Tour
The Purchase and Beyond
The Floatplane Notebooks
The AnnabelleNotebooks
Office to Remain Open
Hippie Dance
Courage
P. 1
Solo; My Adventures in the Air

Solo; My Adventures in the Air

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Published by Workman Publishing
When Clyde Edgerton was four years old, his mother took him to the local airport to see the planes. For Edgerton, it was love at first sight. Eighteen years later, she would take him to the same airport to catch a flight to Texas for Air Force pilot training. In Solo, Edgerton tells the story of his lifelong love affair with flying, from his childlike wonder to his job as a fighter pilot flying reconnaissance over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Now, nearly thirty-five years after the war in Vietnam, he looks back at his youthful passion for flying, at the joy he took in mastering it, at the exhilaration—and lingering anguish—of combat flying. It is a story told with empathy and humor—and with searing honesty that will resonate with every pilot who remembers the first takeoff, the first landing, the first solo. For the nonpilots who always choose the window seat, it’s a thrilling story to live vicariously.
When Clyde Edgerton was four years old, his mother took him to the local airport to see the planes. For Edgerton, it was love at first sight. Eighteen years later, she would take him to the same airport to catch a flight to Texas for Air Force pilot training. In Solo, Edgerton tells the story of his lifelong love affair with flying, from his childlike wonder to his job as a fighter pilot flying reconnaissance over the Ho Chi Minh Trail. Now, nearly thirty-five years after the war in Vietnam, he looks back at his youthful passion for flying, at the joy he took in mastering it, at the exhilaration—and lingering anguish—of combat flying. It is a story told with empathy and humor—and with searing honesty that will resonate with every pilot who remembers the first takeoff, the first landing, the first solo. For the nonpilots who always choose the window seat, it’s a thrilling story to live vicariously.

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Publish date: Nov 10, 2006
Added to Scribd: Feb 03, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9781565128361
List Price: $12.95

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07/04/2014

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9781565128361

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Publishers Weekly reviewed this
Beginning with a fateful trip to a local North Carolina airport at age four and ending with midlife adventures in a small private plane, novelist Edgerton (The Floatplane Notebooks, etc.) turns to autobiography, using his lifelong relationship with aircraft and flying as his navigational center. Four years in UNC's air force ROTC led to service in 1970-1971 as a forward air control pilot in Vietnam, flying missions over the Ho Chi Minh Trail out of Nakhon Phanom Air Base in Thailand. "I do not agree with everything the United States is doing in V.N.," he wrote in a letter home, "but I do believe we should be there." (Like other former believers in the domino theory, Edgerton, who was decorated for his role in a rescue mission, later bitterly changed his mind.) Edgerton presents his flying life dryly and clinically, and includes a great deal of aeronautical detail. The book ends with a paean to his Piper Cub, bought in the late 1980s, and more reflections on Vietnam. Much of the book reads as if Edgerton were sifting the technical details of flying and flight for clues into his own character without quite being aware of his audience. Buffs will get it, but others will be left on the tarmac. Agent, Liz Darhansoff. (Sept. 9) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

2005-05-09, Publishers Weekly
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