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Union Membership Report

Union Membership Report

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Published by: City Room on Feb 03, 2011
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02/03/2011

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Round-the-clock recorded messages
for the
Consumer Price Index
and a variety of other
Bureau of Labor Statistics 
data are available by dialing the
New York-New Jersey Information Office’s 
main telephone number:
(646) 264-3600
. For recorded messages, press ‘
2
’.
 NEW YORK – NEW JERSEY INFORMATION OFFICE New York City, N.Y.
For release: Thursday, February 3, 2011
NYLS – 7470
 
Technical information: Martin Kohli (646) 264-3620 • BLSInfoNY@bls.gov • www.bls.gov/ro2Media contact: Michael L. Dolfman (212) 337-2500
U
NION
M
EMBERSHIP IN
N
EW
Y
ORK AND
N
EW
J
ERSEY
,
 
2010
In 2010, union members accounted for 24.2 percent of wage and salary workers in New York and 17.1 percent in New Jersey, compared to 25.2 percent and 19.3 percent, respectively, in 2009, the U.S.Bureau of Labor Statistics reported today. Regional Commissioner Michael L. Dolfman noted thatunion membership rates in 2010 were the lowest rates recorded in both New York and New Jerseysince 1995, when state data were first comparable. (See chart 1 and table A.) Despite reaching serieslows, both states had union membership rates above that for the nation in 2010, as union membersaccounted for only 11.9 percent of employed wage and salary workers in the United States. NewYork’s union membership rate was the highest in the nation in 2010.
0510152025301995200020052010
Percent ofemployed
Chart 1. Union membership rates, New York,
New Jersey,
 and the United States, 1995-2010
New YorkNew JerseyUnited States
 
 - 2 -New York had 1,959,000 union members in 2010 and New Jersey, 637,000. In addition to thesemembers, another 140,000 wage and salary workers in New York and 23,000 in New Jersey wererepresented by a union on their main job or were covered by an employee association or contract whilenot union members themselves. (See table A.) Nationwide, 14.7 million wage and salary workers wereunion members in 2010, and about 1.6 million wage and salary workers were non-members representedby a union or covered by a contract.
Table A. Union affiliation of employed wage and salary workers in New York and New Jersey, annualaverages, 1995-2010 (numbers in thousands)
Members of unions
1
Represented by unions
2
 Total Percent of Percent ofYear employed Total employed Total employed_ New York1995 7,129 1,975 27.7 2,086 29.31996 7,239 1,942 26.8 2,042 28.21997 7,406 1,949 26.3 2,050 27.71998 7,482 1,900 25.4 1,995 26.71999 7,490 1,897 25.3 1,986 26.52000 7,863 1,958 24.9 2,046 26.02001 7,786 2,005 25.8 2,098 26.92002 7,828 1,981 25.3 2,071 26.52003 7,874 1,936 24.6 2,017 25.62004 7,901 1,996 25.3 2,085 26.42005 8,008 2,090 26.1 2,201 27.52006 8,115 1,981 24.4 2,060 25.42007 8,150 2,055 25.2 2,146 26.32008 8,165 2,029 24.9 2,170 26.62009 8,021 2,019 25.2 2,182 27.22010 8,078 1,959 24.2 2,099 26.0New Jersey1995 3,368 739 21.9 802 23.81996 3,517 768 21.8 832 23.71997 3,652 802 22.0 866 23.71998 3,597 793 22.0 851 23.71999 3,609 741 20.5 807 22.42000 3,766 775 20.6 817 21.72001 3,826 740 19.3 798 20.92002 3,872 757 19.6 797 20.62003 3,777 737 19.5 801 21.22004 3,769 745 19.8 813 21.62005 3,868 791 20.5 838 21.72006 3,827 770 20.1 825 21.62007 3,897 748 19.2 802 20.62008 3,843 703 18.3 731 19.02009 3,734 721 19.3 742 19.92010 3,734 637 17.1 660 17.7___  
1
Data refer to members of a labor union or an employee association similar to a union.
2
Data refer to members of a labor union or an employee association similar to a union, as well as workers who are notmembers but whose jobs are covered by a union or employee association contract.NOTE: Data refer to the sole or principal job of full-and part-time workers. Excluded are all self-employed workersregardless of whether or not their businesses are incorporated. Updated population controls are introduced annually with therelease of the January data.
 
 - 3 -
In 2010, 31 states and the District of Columbia had union membership rates below the U.S. average,11.9 percent, while 19 had higher rates. (See table 1.) All states in the Middle Atlantic (which includes New York and New Jersey) and Pacific divisions reported union membership rates above the nationalaverage, and all states in the East South Central and West South Central divisions had rates below it.(See chart 2.) Union membership rates declined over the year in 33 states (including New York and New Jersey) and the District of Columbia and rose in 17 states.Three states had union membership rates above 20 percent in 2010. New York had the highest rate,followed by Alaska (22.9 percent) and Hawaii (21.8 percent). In fact, New York has had the highestmembership rate in the nation for 14 of the past 16 years. Eight states had union membership rates below 5.0 percent, with North Carolina having the lowest, 3.2 percent. The next lowest rates wererecorded in Arkansas and Georgia (4.0 percent each), Louisiana (4.3 percent), Mississippi (4.5 percent),South Carolina and Virginia (4.6 percent each), and Tennessee (4.7 percent).About half of the 14.7 million union members in the United States lived in just six states (California, 2.4million; New York, 2.0 million; Illinois and Pennsylvania, 0.8 million each; Ohio, 0.7 million; and NewJersey, 0.6 million), though these states accounted for only one-third of wage and salary employmentnationally.State union membership levels depend on both the union membership rate and the employment level.For example, despite having 1.9 million fewer wage and salary employees statewide, New York hadfour times as many union members as Texas. Similarly, New Jersey, with 58,000 fewer wage and salaryemployees, had over four times as many union members as Georgia.

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