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The Special Magazine - Issue 19

The Special Magazine - Issue 19

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Published by barbapapa2010
The Special News Magazine - The Canadian Source for new ideas, fads and in your face social and media news and opinion.
The Special News Magazine - The Canadian Source for new ideas, fads and in your face social and media news and opinion.

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Published by: barbapapa2010 on Feb 04, 2011
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01/29/2013

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HOST YOUR OWNGAME SHOW
 JOHN
MAJHOR
TIFFANY TOWERS
DJ’S LAST INTERVIEW
BEFORE DEATH
TELL-ALL
 
LOVE TIPS
SMARTERSEXIERFREE
 
FOR THE STARSNEW FASHION
HEWITT
ON TV!!!
 
CBC RAT WARNS:
STROMBO’S 
 JOB 
IN 
 JEOPARDY  
    
 B O N U S  M A G I N S I D E ! B O N U S  M A G I N S I D E !
 
 B O N U S  M A G I N S I D E !
SITARA
STAR TURNINGLITTLE MOSQUE
 
this winter
NDP MEMBERS NAILED
olitical circles in New Bruns- wick are abuzz over steamy al-legations that place a formerpresident of the province’s NDPparty at a raging New Year’s Evegala that critics charge crossed party lines. Andthe fall out is causing controversy from coast tocoast.At the centre of the political restorm isCharles Fournier a member of the executive andthe former party president. He is also the NDPrep for the Fredericton-Silverwood riding.The controversy surrounds a party Fournieris alleged to have attended in Moncton, NewBrunswick, on December 31, 2006. Reportsclaim that partygoers were engaged in wilddrug use and obscene sexual acts in front of stunned onlookers.“I felt like it was 1985,” says one person whoattended the party. “The whole night was fullof hard drugs, excessive drinking, and Roman-style sex.”Several revellers have told
the Special
thatthings quickly got out of control when left wingsocialites began living out their wildest fanta-sies. One participant later commented that theNew Year’s debauchery was reminiscent of thegreedy 1980’s.“This was a ‘whose who’ of the province’s ac-tivist community, but I’ve never seen any protestlike this before. Guys were having their way withgirls even though their girlfriends were in thenext room.”Fournier has yet to be fully implicated in theunruly behaviour; however, sources close to theNDP have told
the Special
that party brass areuncomfortable with the message that Fournier’sextracurricular activities send to constituents.Residents of Moncton are also beginning toask questions.“I think the NDP has some explaining to do,”says one Moncton resident. “I want to know where the party stands on family values.”Fournier is not the rst Canadian politician toget in hot water over his merrymaking.
WITH THEIR PANTS DOWN
 E X C L U S I V E  P H O T O
AT ALL-NIGHT ROMAN-STYLE SEX PARTY
ORDER IN THE HOUSE: NDP Member Charles Fournier, wearing his signa-ture Mickey Mouse t-shirt, is only the latest Canadian politician forced toexplain his hard partying ways. According to sources close to
the Special
,the NDP member for New Brunswick, attended a wild New Year’s Eve party  where excessive drug use and obscene sexual acts took centre stage. New Brunswick voters were disgusted; however, experts agree that there’s noshame in a wild night of sex, drugs and rock and roll. ABOVE: Jack Layton,leader of the NDP party, had no comment on the antics of his party reps. ABOVE RIGHT: Andre Boisclair, of the PQ, loves to mix it up and is famous forhis snowy nights out in la belle province.
And this incident is just the latestchapter in a national debate thatpits politicians privacy against thepublic’s right to know.Most recently, in September of 2005, Andre Boisclair, the leader of the PQ inQuebec, openly admitted to using drugs between1996 and 2003, while serving as a member of theQuebec legislature. It is no secret in francophonecircles that Boisclair has a reputation for latenights and tequila sunrises.Unlike Boisclair, however, Fournier’s anticshave caused a stir outside his home province.Political pundits from Halifax, Montreal, andeven Toronto have debated whether Fournier’spolitical career will be able to withstand this lat-est controversy.“Fournier should be concerned,” says politi-cal strategist Reg Turnbull from his ofce atYork University. “He already has a reputationfor stirring the pot, he’s criticized publicly hisown leader. I wouldn’t be surprised if the partyshufes its deck!”
P
Toronto
pecial
S
-R.L. Deakos
 
T
oronto scientists warn that indoor air pol-lution in Canadian homes is leading to acrisis in respiratory problems that couldkill aster than SARS.And a recent study by Health Canada shows thatindoor air pollution is worse or your health thanthe air outdoors,“The quality o indoor air is a special concern orCanadians who spend 90% o the winter monthsindoors,” says housewie Samantha Minqui.“The problem comes rom dust, mold, householdcleaning products, and poor air ventilation. Thiscan lead to a variety o health problems includ-ing asthma, lung cancer and even migraines.”During the 1970s buildings were more tightlyinsulated, windows were sealed to not open, andheating systems were designed to recycle air inan eort to save on re-heating resh air.Companies even used articial insulations suchas asbestos and other materials, which would be-come brittle and fake into the air without propermaintenance.Indoor air pollution experts like Minqui saythat i nothing continues to be done to addressthe problem the consequences could be dire.And or proessor o Public Health, Kirk Smith,rom the University o Caliornia, he worriesthat governments are doing little to regulate theproblem.“Will there be a massive emergency meetingin Geneva o international agencies to take ac-tion?” asks Smith. “The answer is no – indeednothing will be done.”Governments are moving slowly against largecorporations that build and maintain ocesthat suer rom indoor air pollution. In act, theproblem is oten dismissed as Sick Building Syn-drome - an excuse o lazy oce workers lookingor time o work.“Those excuses alone are why clean indoor airhas to begin at home,” concludes Minqui.
SMOKERS HAVE FOUL MOUTHS
INDOOR AIR POLLUTION
A
new study released by the Jones’ Institute shows thatsmokers swear more otenthan non-smokers.The study, conducted this past Jan-uary by doctor Jake Phillips, dem-onstrated that people who smokeive or more cigarettes a day aremore likely to use proanity in theireveryday speech.“There are a number o explana-tions or this,” cites Phillips. “Thereis the act o lighting your cigaretteon a cold and windy day, which canbe rustrating, or burning your newclothes by dropping ash on your-sel.”But that’s not all, Phillips says thatthis study proves that smokers aremore rustrated and agitated by ev-eryday lie than non-smokers.And although swearing has tradi-tionally been considered a low classhabit, Phillips’ study has provedotherwise.“Blue collar workers don’t havedirtier mouths than white collarworkers,” says Phillips. “That’ssomething that people have as-sumed since the beginning o theindustrial revolution.”The doc o all trades goes on toconide to
the Special
that smokersare more likely to consist o peoplewhom have been traumatized byevents rom their childhood andtheir swearing represents an inabil-ity to properly cope with this past.“Smokers smoke cigarettes be-cause they have given up,” explainsPhillips. “Rather than deal withtheir issues. When smokers swearit is because they are angry withthemselves. My conclusion is thatthey need to wash their mouths outwith soap. Both or the smoke andthe swearing.”
NEW STUDY PROVES SWEARING ISN’T A CLASS ISSUE 
 A m a z  i n g  
  S c  i e  n c e
Check your ventilation system and make sure ithas proper outdoor intake, ensuring resh air isgetting in. Outside ventilation is the key to en-suring indoor air emissions are diluted by reshair and old air is taken out.Have heating vents cleaned every ve years toget rid o any dust and particle buildup in theduct work. Clean your urnaces lter every othermonth, this will not only make your home lessdusty, but will save onyour heating costs.Don’t overheat yourhome. High tempera-ture and humiditylevels can increasethe concentration o some pollutants.Purchase an indoor air purier with a HEPAlter or, ailing that, use a desk an to circulateresh air.Open windows every other day or 2-3 hours tolet resh air in.Don’t smoke in your home.Take o your shoes when you enter your home.Soil rom outside your home can contain sub-stances you don’t want inside.Most importantly, dust and vacuum regularlyand use natural cleaners such as vinegar andwater, borax powder and non-synthetic cleaningdetergents and soaps.
POISONING HOUSEWIVES
WHAT YOU CAN DO TOPROTECT YOUR HOME
Toronto
pecial
S
-M.A. Tamburro
-A.D. Washboro

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