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Isaac Van Wagoner Carling by Daughter Martha Jane

Isaac Van Wagoner Carling by Daughter Martha Jane

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Published by Karisa Walker
Martha Jane Carling Webb Porter born Martha Jane Carling 25 June 1867 - 3 October 1952 by Elaine Johnson Submitted to the USGenWeb Project and IDGenWeb Project Archives by Elaine Johnson on 28 November 1996. USGenWeb Project NOTICE: In keeping with our policy of providing free information on the internet, data may be used by non-commercial entities, as long as this message remains on all copied material. These electronic pages may not be reproduced in any format for profit, nor for commercial pr
Martha Jane Carling Webb Porter born Martha Jane Carling 25 June 1867 - 3 October 1952 by Elaine Johnson Submitted to the USGenWeb Project and IDGenWeb Project Archives by Elaine Johnson on 28 November 1996. USGenWeb Project NOTICE: In keeping with our policy of providing free information on the internet, data may be used by non-commercial entities, as long as this message remains on all copied material. These electronic pages may not be reproduced in any format for profit, nor for commercial pr

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Published by: Karisa Walker on Feb 05, 2011
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Martha Jane Carling Webb Porterborn Martha Jane Carling25 June 1867 - 3 October 1952by Elaine Johnson Submitted to the USGenWeb Project and IDGenWeb Project Archives by ElaineJohnson on28 November 1996. USGenWeb Project NOTICE:In keeping with our policy of providing free information on the internet,data may be usedby non-commercial entities, as long as this message remains on all copiedmaterial. Theseelectronic pages may not be reproduced in any format for profit, nor forcommercialpresentation by any other organization. Persons or organizations desiring to use this material for purposes otherthan as statedabove, must obtain express written permission from the author, or thesubmitter and fromthe listed USGenWeb Project archivist. FAMILY HISTORY BY MARTHA CARLING WEBB PORTERLogan, Utah, June 20, 1932 A bit of Family History which I shall write for the benefit of mychildren inyears to come, when they become interested in genealogical work, for thepurposeof doing temple ordinance work for kindred dead. I will first tell yousomething ofmy parents. I did not realize the importance of recording their history whattheycould have given me before they were gone, and now it is too late, and so Iwill tryto record those things which I think will be of interest to them when I shallnolonger be with them. My father, Isaac Vanwagoner Carling, was born Nov. 30, 1831,Klinesopus, Ulster County, New York. He was son of John Carling, who was bornSept 11, 1800, Kingston, Ulster County, New York. He was the son of GabraelCarling. We have no farther record of Gabrael Carling at present. Isaac V. Carling's mother was Emmeline Keaton, born Nov. 1, 1806, diedJan 1, 1844. She was the daughter of Jacob Keaton and Catherine Keaton. At the time of the organization of the Church of Jesus Christ ofLatterdaySaints, in the year of 1830, by the Prophet Joseph Smith my Grandfather JohnCarling joined the church in its early days, cannot give the dates, but thefamilywith the other early members of the church, suffered mobbings and drivingsfrom
 
their homes and those persecutions and hardships which were forced upon thembytheir wicked enemies. My mother, Asenath Elizabeth Browning, born Nov. 17, 1835, Adams Co,Illinois. She was married to my father I.V. Carling in the Endowment House,inSalt Lake City, in 1854. They lived at Ogden with my mother's people forabouttwo years, after their marriage. Sarah their oldest child was born in OgdenFeb. 25,1856. Upon coming to Utah, John Carling and his family including IsaacCarlingsettled in Provo, but in 1853 they were called by the authorities to move toFillmoreto help build up that new settlement, which at that time was the Capitol oftheTerritory of Utah. Both of my Grandfathers John Carling and Jonathon Browningserved terms in the Legislature which was held in the old State House inFillmore.My father I.V. Carling made their home in Fillmore after the first two yearsofmarried life, where their children Emeline Asenath, Ann, Laura Malvina, OliveCharilla, Catherine Aurelia, Martha Jane, Phebe Malinda, Isaac VanwagonerJr.,Mary Alice, Miriam Eliza, Barbara Amelia were all born in Fillmore with theexception of Barbara Amelia, who was born in Orderville, Kane County, Utah.[According to the Fillmore Ward records she was blessed 7 June 1867 by ThomasR. King.] Our parents moved to Orderville about the month of May 1875 for thepurpose of living in the united order, as the people there seemed to bemaking agreater success of living it than attempted to live this co-operation, andthey hadfailed, and had gone back to the old way of living. Our parents felt that tolive andpractice this order of living would be a better way to live, and raise theirchildren,and so they sold  the home in Fillmore and cast their lot with the Ordervillepeople.Turned in all their property to the association, excepting the personalproperty, andall members of the family who were old enough to work, were soon given theirwork to do, and were soon absorbed in the hive of industry, where all wereunitedin the work for all. At this time I was eight years old, and of course not big enough to domuchwork, but looked forward to the time when I would be old enough to take turnswith the older girls waiting on the big table, for the people all ate at onetable alltogether. I will tell you of the founding, and of the founders of Orderville.Theseare the names of the company of people called from Nephi to the Muddy country
 
to pioneer that place make settlements and homes in that part of Utah,SanjaunCounty. The seasons were too short there to allow the crops to mature, beforethefrost would come and ruin them in fall, and they were so far away from, andsuchbad roads to the settlements, that it became necessary for them to abandonthat partof the country. The Indians too, were very troublesome, they would steal anddrivethe cattle, horses etc off, and made it very hard for these sturdy pioneersto livethere, and so President Brigham Young (who had the supervision of thepioneeringand colonizing Utah, as well as parts of other western states) recalled thislittlecompany, consisting of Samuel Claradge, Israel Hoyt, George Harmon, ThomasStalworthy, William Heaton, there may have been others who I do not know, yesthere is John Esplin also, and these faithful and trusted men with theirfamilies weresent to Long Valley which is a long narrow valley, in the center of thisvalley in thewilds, here they established a settlement and called it Orderville, in KaneCounty,Utah. This company procured a sawmill, others came and joined them, andturnedwhat property they had, into the order, for the use of all. [Martha wasbaptized 13August 1876 when she was nine years old.] This order had been running more than a year, when my parents movedfrom Fillmore to Orderville. Here all were poor alike, none felt above theothersbecause of wealth, because all shared alike. The people who joined the United Order were given work that they coulddo best, or liked to do best, so far as they could consistently, but this wasnotalways possible. The people who joined this settlement were all rebaptized and madecovements that they would keep the commandments, there were certain rulescalledRules of the United Order, to be observed by all members of the United Order. We did not have much money to turn in, but what he did have was turnedover to the authorities with the other property. My mother's dishes were alsoincluded, all but a few choice pieces that were given to her as gifts, allothers wentto the public kitchen, for they were needed there, and, as we were going toeat atthe public Dining Hall, we would not need them at home. I well remember the first meal that I ate at the big table, a littlegirl livingnear by asked  me to go to dinner with her to the big table, as it was calledby the

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