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Aircraft Profile No 227 the Airspeed Oxford

Aircraft Profile No 227 the Airspeed Oxford

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Published by Luke Goh
Aircraft Profile No 227 The Airspeed Oxford
Aircraft Profile No 227 The Airspeed Oxford

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Published by: Luke Goh on Feb 06, 2011
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12/06/2012

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35p/$1'50
The
Airspeed
Oxford
by
John
D.
R. Rawlings
 
Editorially
speaking
.
.
.
Tlris
is
only
the second
occasionthat
Editorially
Speaking. .
.has
appeared
in
print-the
debut
beingmade
in
Airuaft
Proy'les
Nos.
225
and
226.
So
it
is
still
too early
to
be
able
to
test the
reaction
of
readers
to
this
new
departrnent.
Bui
it
will
dono
harm
to
re-
capitulate
thatthis
page
is
intended
to
provide
a
closer
link
between
the authors,the
publishers
and thepublic.
Your
com-ments
are
welcomed
providing
you
r,rnderstand
and
accept the
content
of
Guidelines
onLetters
elservhere
on
this
page.
ThankYou'
.HARLES
w. .AINABOUT
THEAUTHOR
No.227Airspeed Oxfordvariants
John
D.
R.
Rawlingsis an
author
best
known
for
his
l-tistorical and
contemporarywritings
on
theBritish Royal
Air
Force.
That
it
is
possible
to
conrbineprofessional
interests-as
it
were
"a
wing
and
a
prayer"-is
evident
in
that
the excellent
bigbookFighter
Squadrons
oJ
the
R.A.F.(Macdonald,London,
f6'00)
is
ascribed
to
the Rev. J.
D.
R.
Rawlings.As
pron-rised
in
theprelin-rinaryannouncement,there ismore
than
a
hint of
purenostalgia
in
John
Rawlings'
tribute
to
thehard-worked
Airspeed
Oxford.
Enthusiasticadvance reception
seems
to
bear
out our
original
belief
that the
"Ox-box"
isgoing
to
be
a verypopular
new
Pro.file.
Volume
9
now
readY
Eighteen
separate
titles,over
100,000
words covering
Nos.
193
to
210,
in
a
beautifulgreen
andgoldbinding
(matching
the eight
previous
volumes)
.
.
the latest
additior-r
to
the uniqueaviation
library ofAircraft in
Profile.
Volume 9is now
ready,price
f6'00.
If
you
rvant
further
details,
drop
a
line
ro
Profiles
of
Winclsor; there
could
be
a
stockistin
your
area.
YOUR
COMMENTS
Maryland
memories
Congratulationsl
Air
craft
P
rofi
Ie
s
are beautiful.
I
wouldlike
to
see
the
following
.
.
.(list
of
aircraft
types
too
long
for
inclusion-Editor).
I
arnmost
pleased
No.232
wlll
be
Martin
Maryland,
a
graceful
aircraft.
Concerning
the
MarYland,
I
well recall
an
incident on
JulY
14,
1941
in
my home
townof
Corfu.
A
Vichy
French
Martin
l67.4.-3
with
seriousengine
trouble
crash-
ed
in
the
town
centreclose
to
mY
home.
It
landedin
what
is
now thegarden
of
the
Corfu
Palace
Hotel.Five
bodieswere recovered.
I
still
have
a
souvenir,
a
piece
of
the
metalskinningpainted
in
dis-
tinctive
orangeas
part
of
Vichy'sneutralitymarkingsof
orangeand
yellow
stripes.
ANDREASSTAMATOPOULOS
Corfu,
Greece.
Tn'o
of
reader
Mihail
Moise.stu's
I.A.R.'80
photos;note the
revised
(
March
30,
1941
)
national
ntarkings
in
the.fl.t'ing
Jbrntation.
Eorronrrrrv
spEAKING
. .
.
Aircraft
Profiles certainly spanthe
worldand,no doubt,this
page
will
reflect
theinternationalflavour
of
the
readership.Note: Yichyneutrality
stripes
rvere
red and
yellorv.
Your next
No.
228
variants
AIRCRAFT
PROFILE
Fieseler
Fi 156
Storch
Once
again
Richard P.
Bateson tackles
a
Germansubject,
this time the
ubiquitous
Fieseler
Srorcir
(Stork).This
rvas
one
of
the
first
S.T.O.L.(ShortTake-Off
&
Landing)
types
designed
as
such.
Many
famousnames are among those
who flew
or
rvere
flown
in
examples
of
theStorch,
possibly
the
most
famous episode
was
that involving
the
rescue
of
the
imprisoned
Mussolini.Surprisingly,
the
Fi
1
56 has
never
been
fully
researched
for
publication.
Until
now.
And
r.vorth
waiting for
!
How about?
Please
consider
the follorving
suggestions
.
Boeing B-52
Stratofortress; MiG-21
"Fishbed"
LTV
A-7
Corsair
II;
GlosterMeteor
Mks.
I
to
III
and the
Romanian
l.A.R.
80/B
I
.
ERIC
ODELL
Huntington
Beach,
cA
92646,
U.S.A.
EorrontrLly
spEAKIr.-c
. . . Mr.
Odell rvill
be
amazed
to
learn
that
quite
a
ferv
of
his
sug-
gestionsarealready beingprepared
as
futureProfiles.
To
be honest, though, one
is not
yet
'rofiles.
To
be honest, though, one
is not
yet
on thedrawing
board"-the
LA.R.
80.
Hon-
ever,
it
isthe subject
ol
a
selection
of
hithertounpublicisedphotos
sent
to
us
from
Bucharest
by
readerMoisescu as recently as June
1971.
We thought
you'd
Iike
to
see
a
couple of
thenr.
Guidelineson
letters
Hereare
a
lew
simpleguidelines
for
readers
rvishing
to
write
to
Aircraft
Pro.files
and
its
authors:
(l)
letters
should
be
brief
and,
preferably,constructive;
(2)
letters
intended
for individual
authors
will
be sent
on
to
them:
(3)
except
lor
sales
queries,
correspondents
should
relrain
lrom
submitting
long listsof
questions,especially
those
which
have
no
bearing
on
existing
or
forthcoming
Profiles;
(4)theEditor
reserves
the
right
to
extracr
relevant
sections
from
letters
for
publicationunlesscorrespondents
signify otherwise;
and
(5)
because
the
Editor
has
only
lir-nited
tirne todeal
with
additional
correspondence,
similarly
he
reserves
the
right
to
delay
individual
replies
or,
where
it
appears
that
no reply
is
necessary,
simply
to
accept
gratefully
readers'
appreciation
of
the
time
factor.
Address
):ourletters
to:
Editorially
speaking.
.
.
Aircraft
Profiles,
Profile
Publications
Ltd.,
CoburgHouse,
Sheet
Street,Windsor, Berks. SL4
lEB,
England.
 
The
prototfpe
AirspeedOxforclfying
at the time
ofthefnal
R.A.F.
Pogeant
in
June 1937.
It
was
equippeclwitha
dummy
turret
ancl the
blacknumber"J"
referred
to its
placingin the
NewTypes
Parkqt
the
Hendoil
Pageont.
(Photo:Airspeed
ref.G.2734 via the
Author)
The
Airspeed
Oxford
by
John
D.
R. Rawlings
IN
MARCH
1936,
the
Royal
Air
Force Station
at
Manston,Kent,
witnessed
a
significant
event
with
the
arrival, on
charge
of No.
48 Squadron,
of
three
Avro
Ansons.
It
was the
first
modern monoplaneordered
by
the
R.A.F.
in
largequantities
which introduced
such
complications
as
flaps
andaretractable
undercarriage;
complications
with
which the
newgenerations
of
air-
crew
would
need
to
become acquainted.
The
Anson
was, relatively-speaking
"a
dear"
to
fly.
But, following
in
its train
were
to
come
more
potent
monoplanes,
with
habitssufficiently vicious
(compared
with
thebiplanes of the
mid-l930s)
to
cause
pilots
topay
closer
attention
to
their flying
skills.
With
these new
types coming
into
service
in
numbers
not
dreamed
ol
since
WorldWar
One
it
did not
takethe
Air
Ministry
long
to
realise
that
new
advanced
trainerswould
beneeded
to
match the aircrew
to their
new types.
Accord-
ingly,
two
Specifications
were
issued, T.6136
for
a
single-engined
trainer and
T.23136
for
a
twin-engined
trainer.
For
thelatter
Specification,
aninvitation
wassent
to Airspeed
(1934)
Ltd.,
of
Portsmouth.
Hampshire.
to
submit
a tender.
DEVELOPMENT
The
reasonbehind
the
Air
Ministry's invitation
to
Airspeed
was
soundenough.
Although
Airspeed
was
not
one
of
thegiants
ol
the
British
aircralt
industry.
having
existed
for
onlyfive
years,
nevertheless
it
had
moreexperience
in
producing
aircraft
equipped
with
retract-
able
undercarriages
than
anyother
British manufacturer
at that
time. Equally
important,
Airspeedhad
recently
had
some
success
with
the
,4..5.6,
a small,
twin-engined
airliner
called
the Envoy which lookedagoodstarting
point.
And from
this
basis
the
design
team,
led
by
A.
Hessell
Tiltman, did work.
However,
because
of
the
multiplicity
of
functions
required
in
the
Specification
(pilot-training,
navigation- night-
and
instrument-flying,together
with
radio,gunnery,photographicandbomb-
ing
training)the aircraft which
emerged
bore
only
a
superficial
resemblance
to
the
Envoy.
Airspeed
gave
the
aircraft
the designationA.S.10 and the
Air
Ministry
named
it
the
Oxford.
As
with
so
many new
types.
the cautious
Air
Ministry
made
matters
difficult
for
the manufacturing
company
by
ordering
only
a
relativelysmall and
uneconomic
quantityat
first-the
initial
order
in
October
1936was
lor
136
aircraft.
Even
so,
for
the
companythis
was
much
larger
than any
order theyhad
received
hitherto.
It
was
to
necessitate
much
rearrangement
ol
the
Ports-
mouth lactory to
gear
it lor
mass
production,
rearrange-
ment
which would involve
adelay
in
gettingquantityproductionunder
way.There
was
no undue delay
with
the
originalprototype
(R.A.F.
serialL4534), which
flew
lor
the
first
time
97

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