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Table Of Contents

Welcome!
To the 3rd edition of practical font design
Corinthian Light
Defining typography
Quotations on typography
Not surprisingly, the best quote is from Hermann Zapf
What you can reasonably expect
Some terminology
Type parts
Some glyph terminology
Bringhurst’s List of font classifications
Our carved roots
Carol Twombley
A practical list
Minimal Serif Font Classifications
Venetian: Adobe Jenson Pro
Adobe Jenson Pro
Aldine: Bembo
Bembo
Garalde: Garamond 3
French Old Style: ITC Galliard French Old Style: ITC Galliard
ITC Galliard
Dutch Old Style: Janson
Janson Text
English Old Style: Caslon
Adobe Caslon
Transitional: Baskerville
Baskerville
Baskerville’s influence on typography
The entire oldstyle period of font design
Modern: Bodoni Book
Bodoni Book
Slab Serif: Cheltenham
Realist: Clarendon
Late 19th & early 20th Century
Sans serif classifications
Gothic: Franklin Gothic
Franklin Gothic
Geometric Sans: Futura
Futura
Populist commoner: Helvetica
“Normal” fonts—the default sans—neo-grotesques
Stylized Sans: Gill Sans
The relatively friendly sans serif styles
Humanist Sans: Optima
Readable, modulated sans serif fonts for text
Optima
What about the rest of the type styles?
Decorative
Mimicking handwriting
Type drawing tools
Vector drawing tools & techniques using Illustrator CS5
The Pen Tool
How do you add that skill?
How do you draw with paths?
So, how does the Pen tool work?
A simple drawing exercise
Extrema
Path rules for drawing fonts
Crossing handles:
Too many points:
Points on top of each other
Your assignment for now
Setting up an Illustrator template
Setting the Character Origin
Setting the font size
Ascender guide
Descender guide
X-height guide
Cap Height
Add labels to the guides
Add the overshoots
Adjustments
Why do we start with Illustrator?
The creation of a font
A step by step procedure
Now it’s time to begin
A new unilateral serif font
Begin with a new or base font
The Font Info dialog in FontLab
Picking a name
Names and Copyright
But we are just designing a regular font here
OpenType-Specific Names
Additional OpenType Names
Copyright Information
Embedding
Designer Information
License Information
Version and Identification
Key Identification settings
Metrics and Dimensions
Key Dimensions
Setting vertical metrics
Ascender/descender totals 1000
TrueType-specific metrics
Subscript and Superscript
Hinting settings
Setting up your workspace
Preferences
Uncheck for sure
Make sure these are checked
Font window
Keyboard shortcuts
Starting to draw
There are many ways to start a glyph:
Scan & trace
Looking for typical pieces
Copy/Paste procedure
Setting up guides
FontLab drawing techniques
Shaping the glyph: Cap I
Shaping the glyph: Lowercase l
Saving building pieces
Vector Paint
Building a storage glyph
This adds a new glyph, ll
Shaping the glyph: lowercase h
This is what we have at this point:
Now we have it!
Shaping the glyphs: y, v, & w
Drawing weight balls
Adjusting the y measurements
The v is built from the y
The w is built from the v:
Shaping the glyphs: n & m
Now let’s do the m:
Dealing with path direction
Shaping the glyphs: b. d. p, & q
Width measuring more efficiently
Moving to the d:
Back to the d
Worse than I thought
Moving to the P
Designing the q
Shaping the glyphs: o
Shaping the glyphs: R
Shaping the glyphs: i
Shaping the glyphs: j
Shaping the glyphs: . (period)
Shaping the glyphs: x
Shaping the rest of the lowercase
Starting with the capital letters
Shaping the glyphs: H
Shaping the glyphs: J & K
Shaping the glyphs: M
Finishing the numbers & letters
This is where we stand now
Some tips before we go on
This is a major change in the book!
I do not trust automated solutions
Letterspacing
Some definitions
The decisions needed for good letter fit
To quote Moye again:
Basic methodology
FontLab’s Metrics panel
Letterspacing: Hs & Os
Let’s look at traditional setups
Typical adjustments to spacing
For Cutlass the figures are:
Display or Text?
Some letterspacing tips
Finishing the ll glyph
Generating fonts for testing
Finishing the 8-bit font
Making an ampersand
Making curly quotes
Making a Yen
Making an Eth
I see no need to go further
Generating the basic characters
Shaping the glyphs: Æ
Finishing the rest of the basic 256 characters
The 8-bit font
Here’s what is completed so far
Adding OpenType Features
The fun part of the new OpenType capabilities
Yes, this is coding. Yes, I do not do this well
What is an OpenType feature?
This is code so typos break the function
Writing an OpenType feature
I just wrote a new feature file that looks like this
Feature names
How a feature works
Using classes
The address for the features file is:
Saving your feature sets
Adding features to our new font
Finishing the glyph designs
Shaping the glyphs: Oldstyle figures
Shaping the glyphs: Lining figures
Shaping the glyphs: Small caps
Resizing the caps to small caps
Building ligatures
Shaping the glyphs: tt
Shaping the glyphs: ct, ck, ch
Shaping the glyphs: sh, sk, st, sp
Compared to kerning: it was!
Kerning your new font
The Metrics window
The need for a kerning text document
Adding your kerning text document
Using the Metrics window to kern
The kerning process
Moving from pair to pair
Moving from line to line
Adjusting the kerning
Dealing with the preview size issues
The tricky part is remembering the spacing
Spacing is a major part of your design
Kerning guidelines
Tracing drawings & artwork
Placing into Illustrator
Make sure the scan is clean
Live Trace in Illustrator
Designing font families
Let’s start traditional
So, what’s the problem now?
Book font family characteristics
Text versus display
Family weights
The need for text and display versions
The need for a sans version
The whole family will be 20 fonts or more
History Break: Minister
The final look I am seeking
Building the book weight
Designing the first characters
Making it more traditional
Building the pieces
Starting the capitals
Path direction
Setting the cap width
This is why font design is an art
This font was well under way
Building the black weight
Here we start running into the naming issues
So here’s the setup I used for Contenu:
So here’s the setup I used for Contenu Black:
Why not use the Bold effect?
Building the O
Crossbars
The lowercase glyphs
The ll glyph is a left-handed solution
It will look very strange at first
Then I have to make the changes for Contenu Book-Bold
Save under the new name: ContenuBook-Bold
Blend again to make the medium weight
Building the blends
Finishing off the 8-bit portions
Watch yourself as you work
Changes necessary for Contenu Black
The resulting Black glyph set looks like this:
Double-check everything
Building the italics
The importance of the metrics
Dealing with the weight
Setting the spacing
Getting started
The actual names used
Spacing the slanted glyphs
Global mask
Using the same shapes for right spacing
Like the ll glyph, the pp glyph is for lefties
Initial spacing
Dealing with the lowercase
Building the Black Italic
Most of the 8-bit characters are simply slanted
Necessary italic changes
Fix the extrema
Slant to vertical
Building Italic composites
Adding italic features
Small Cap Overshoots
Building a new feature set for bold italics
Kerning & Assembling the family
Keeping the family consistent
Readjusting the letterspacing
Adding the classes
Dealing with the italics
This is just grunt work
Generating the fonts
Finding testers
Test before you release
Building the Display version
Foibles of the Metrics window
Start with letterspacing
Fixing ligatures
Examining the glyphs
Display version is on the left
Finishing Titre
Oh no! The sites are confused
I changed the name to Contenu Book Display
Now we have a 9-font group
I start with Contenu Book
Dealing with the special shapes
Setting the weight
Reworking the glyphs
The lowercase h
The lowercase d
The lowercase m
The lowercase g
The capital A
The capital I
Design for designers
Adding the bold version
The lowercase bold a
General design vision changes
The @ symbol
Dealing with Bold Small Caps
Kerning the fonts
One more name change
Finishing them off
Here’s what we ended up with
P.S: I guess I better work on a Web version next
P. 1
Practical Font Design: Third Edition

Practical Font Design: Third Edition

Ratings: (0)|Views: 13,280|Likes:
Published by David Bergsland
The radically revised & expanded
Third Edition of
Practical Font Design
Practical Font Design has found a niche within that group of graphic designers and Web designers who want to design their own fonts. The comment from Readable Web is what I’ve hoped to hear:
“If you’re looking for a brief, straightforward introduction to fonts, I recommend David Bergsland’s Practical Font Design. Unlike a lot of books that make you feel like you’re seated in the back row of a crowded lecture hall, this one feels like a private tutorial…a good book, and I wish there were more like it…” Richard Fink
I have learned a lot about font design after going full-time in 2009. Part of these materials appeared in Part Two, where I went through the development of font families. But much has simply happened as I took the new techniques developed for the books and used them. It is obvious that I need to combine the two parts into a whole. This calls for a radical rearrangement of the content to make it flow better. Plus I added new materials to flesh out the content.

David Bergsland, Owner/designer
Mankato, Minnesota
http://hackberry-fonts.com
The radically revised & expanded
Third Edition of
Practical Font Design
Practical Font Design has found a niche within that group of graphic designers and Web designers who want to design their own fonts. The comment from Readable Web is what I’ve hoped to hear:
“If you’re looking for a brief, straightforward introduction to fonts, I recommend David Bergsland’s Practical Font Design. Unlike a lot of books that make you feel like you’re seated in the back row of a crowded lecture hall, this one feels like a private tutorial…a good book, and I wish there were more like it…” Richard Fink
I have learned a lot about font design after going full-time in 2009. Part of these materials appeared in Part Two, where I went through the development of font families. But much has simply happened as I took the new techniques developed for the books and used them. It is obvious that I need to combine the two parts into a whole. This calls for a radical rearrangement of the content to make it flow better. Plus I added new materials to flesh out the content.

David Bergsland, Owner/designer
Mankato, Minnesota
http://hackberry-fonts.com

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Published by: David Bergsland on Feb 09, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial
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