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UNICEF WASH in Schools- Madagascar- 2007

UNICEF WASH in Schools- Madagascar- 2007

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Published by HayZara Madagascar
This report presents the findings of an assessment of the UNICEF Madagascar Water Sanitation and Hygiene – hereafter WASH – in schools programme. The study assessed the activities carried out, documented experiences and lessons, with an aim to strengthen the country and other regional programmes. The findings of the study are intended to facilitate scaling-up of school-based activities. Key areas assessed include the school WASH package, partnerships, educational materials, guiding policies and delivery mechanisms within UNICEF Water and Environmental Sanitation (WES) section. Best practices for each element of the WASH package have been captured in each section describing the elements.
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NETWAS
2007
This report presents the findings of an assessment of the UNICEF Madagascar Water Sanitation and Hygiene – hereafter WASH – in schools programme. The study assessed the activities carried out, documented experiences and lessons, with an aim to strengthen the country and other regional programmes. The findings of the study are intended to facilitate scaling-up of school-based activities. Key areas assessed include the school WASH package, partnerships, educational materials, guiding policies and delivery mechanisms within UNICEF Water and Environmental Sanitation (WES) section. Best practices for each element of the WASH package have been captured in each section describing the elements.
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NETWAS
2007

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Published by: HayZara Madagascar on Feb 11, 2011
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11/15/2011

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Unicef WASH in SchoolsMadagascar
An Assessment Report08 – 27 March 2007
Network for Water and Sanitation International
*Networking *Capacity Building *Applied Research *Learning *Gender Issues*Information Services*
 
 i
Summary
This report presents the findings of an assessment of the UNICEF Madagascar WaterSanitation and Hygiene – hereafter WASH – in schools programme. The study assessedthe activities carried out, documented experiences and lessons, with an aim to strengthenthe country and other regional programmes. The findings of the study are intended tofacilitate scaling-up of school-based activities. Key areas assessed include the schoolWASH package, partnerships, educational materials, guiding policies and deliverymechanisms within UNICEF Water and Environmental Sanitation (WES) section. Bestpractices for each element of the WASH package have been captured in each sectiondescribing the elements
.
Since 2004, UNICEF WES has implemented a school WASH package consisting of construction of safe water points, sanitary latrines, urinals for boys and girls, handwashing facilities and hygiene training of teachers and parents’ association. The packagehas been implemented in 167 schools located in 12 districts. UNICEF aims to scale upthe activities to cover the 111 districts in the country. Hardware and software issues of the package were studied. Strengths and weaknesses were noted with recommendationsfor improvement proposed.The Double Pit Latrine integrating the SanPlat floor slab system is used in the schoolsvisited. The model has two pits, used alternatively when one is filled up, prolonging thelatrine’s life. Some of the strengths observed include easy cleaning as little or no water isused; a small drop-hole that is safe for use by small children; provision of tightly fittinglids which minimises smells and flies. The latrines were clean with no faeces on the flooror walls. Construction of urinals for boys and girls has seen the extension of latrine lifethrough separation of faeces and urine. Studies indicate that pupils visit the toilet moretimes to urinate than to defecate.Hygienic behaviour is well integrated, with pupils practising hand washing with soapafter toilet visits. Good hygiene behaviour among pupils can be attributed to hygieneeducation received from teachers. Teachers received hygiene training through theUNICEF project. Hygiene training focused on 3 WASH messages: hand washing withsoap; proper use of latrines and safe storage of drinking water. Use of participatorymethods by teachers has reinforced the hygiene messages transmitted to pupils in class.Availability of hand washing facilities, their strategic location and provision of soap atschool all serve to reinforce hygiene practices.Provision of soap and anal wiping materials are some of the best practices noted in thecourse of the study. These materials are collected from pupils and stored in class for re-distribution by teachers. This system caters for pupils who are unable to provide theseresources as re-distribution is done equitably. The system of collection devised byteachers ensures materials are sufficient for all. Another good practice seen was thedisposal of anal wiping material in a receptacle provided in the latrine and subsequentburning. This practice is preferred over dumping in the latrine pit and reduces the rate atwhich it fills up.
 
 ii However several areas requiring strengthening were noted. The absence of separatelatrine blocks for boys and girls; little involvement of users in the design of infrastructure; open-air latrines that cannot be used when it rains; inconsistency in theemptying and burning of anal wiping materials; lack of maintenance and repair budgetsfor WASH facilities, to name a few.In the absence of guiding policies, a favourable environment for the development of WASH in schools is provided by the
 Madagascar Action Plan (MAP)
, and the existenceof a national Diorano-WASH initiative. The initiative has facilitated the creation of anational WASH in Schools Thematic Group, bringing together key stakeholders fromgovernment, local and international NGOs, bilateral and multilateral agencies, privatesector and the media. However, inadequate staffing of the WES section at UNICEF hasdecreased its ability to capitalise on provided opportunities. It has also greatly reducedability to implement key activities on the ground such as monitoring and follow-up. Inthis regard, key recommendations are summarised as follows:
1.
 
The number of WES staff should be increased to three and WASH should begiven full programme status within the country programme as required forpriority countries.Implementation of this recommendation will effectively support the development of aUNICEF WASH in schools strategy defining a clear monitoring and scaling-up plan. Itwill also enable the WES section to:
2.
 
Provide support government in the development of a national WASH in schoolsstrategy
3.
 
Carry out systematic documentation and dissemination of lessons learned and bestpractices
4.
 
Provide technical support to strengthen the capacity of partners (NGO andgovernment staff) on the ground in areas such as monitoring and gender
5.
 
Strengthen existing partner monitoring systems with regard to WASH in schoolsThe Madagascar WASH in schools experience provides valuable lessons to learn from,not only to strengthen the country’s programme but regional programmes. The lessonslearned and best practices captured in this report are all key ingredients for thedevelopment of a scaling up strategy. Integration of the global WASH initiative in thenational development plan has provided momentum for its adoption and incorporation bythe ministry of education in the school education programme. Inclusion of WASH in theMAP has provided an effective advocacy niche for WASH in schools, a niche that WESis yet to exploit to its fullest. With adequate staffing, WES will be able to further theWASH in schools agenda in all sectors and participate in policy influence.

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