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segregation in casting

segregation in casting

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Published by Asmaa Smsm Abdallh

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Published by: Asmaa Smsm Abdallh on Feb 12, 2011
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09/12/2012

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 Segregation in Casting
by
Ali Abdallah Ali
Section Three
 
 Department of metallurgical and materials engineering  Faculty of petroleum and mining engineering Suez Canal University
 
 2
 
Contents
1.
 
Introduction ……………………………32.
 
Microsegregation……………………….53.
 
Macrosegregation………………………84.
 
Dendritic segregation………………….125.
 
Gravity segregation……………………146.
 
Reference ……………………………...17
 
 3
Abstract
Segregation is one of the defects in the casting process that have various shapes some are normal and someare inverse, some occurs on microscopic scale and some onmacroscopic scale, some types result due to difference indensity and some due to difference in temperature, there area lot of types and shapes of segregation on which we willspot some light.
Introduction
Segregation may be defined as any departure fromuniform distribution of the chemical elements in the alloy.Because of the way in which the solutes in alloys partition between the solid and the liquid during freezing, it followsthat all castings are segregated to some extent.
[1]
During solidification of liquid metals and alloys, crystalsformation takes place. The resulting morphology hascertain characteristics peculiar to cast structures.Morphology includes both
macrostructure
and
microstructure
.
[3]
 Some variation in composition occurs on a microscopicscale between dendrite arms, known as microsegregation. Itcan usually be significantly reduced by a homogenizingheat treatment because the distance, usually in the range10-100 µm, over which diffusion has to take place toredistribute the alloying elements, is sufficiently small.
[1]
 Macrosegregation cannot be removed. It occurs over distances ranging from 1 cm to 1 m, and so cannot be

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