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Table Of Contents

Conclusion
Notes
P. 1
Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise, 2nd Edition, by Cogan, Hubbard, & Kessler

Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise, 2nd Edition, by Cogan, Hubbard, & Kessler

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Published by Hoover Institution
Health care in the United States has made remarkable advances during the past forty years. Yet our health care system also has several well-known problems: high costs, significant numbers of people without insurance, and glaring gaps in quality and efficiency—and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 is not the answer. This second edition of Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise details a better approach, offering fundamental reform alternatives centering on tax changes, insurance market changes, and redesigning Medicare and Medicaid.

The book proposes five specific reforms to improve the ability of markets to create a lower-cost, higher-quality health care system that is responsive to the needs of individuals, including increasing individual involvement, deregulating insurance markets and redesigning Medicare and Medicaid, improving availability and quality of information, enhancing competition, and reforming the malpractice system. The authors show that, by promoting cost-conscious behavior and competition in both private markets and government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, we can slow the rate of growth of health care costs, expand access to high-quality health care, and slow down runaway spending.
Health care in the United States has made remarkable advances during the past forty years. Yet our health care system also has several well-known problems: high costs, significant numbers of people without insurance, and glaring gaps in quality and efficiency—and the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 is not the answer. This second edition of Healthy, Wealthy, and Wise details a better approach, offering fundamental reform alternatives centering on tax changes, insurance market changes, and redesigning Medicare and Medicaid.

The book proposes five specific reforms to improve the ability of markets to create a lower-cost, higher-quality health care system that is responsive to the needs of individuals, including increasing individual involvement, deregulating insurance markets and redesigning Medicare and Medicaid, improving availability and quality of information, enhancing competition, and reforming the malpractice system. The authors show that, by promoting cost-conscious behavior and competition in both private markets and government programs such as Medicare and Medicaid, we can slow the rate of growth of health care costs, expand access to high-quality health care, and slow down runaway spending.

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Publish date: Mar 1, 2011
Added to Scribd: Feb 15, 2011
Copyright:Traditional Copyright: All rights reservedISBN:9780817910648
List Price: $14.95

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04/06/2014

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9780817910648

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Roxana Mazilu liked this
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very very nice
Hoover Institution added this note
In stores tomorrow! “Without corrective action, financing public programs will soon require large middle-class tax increases, the issuance of unprecedented amounts of public debt, and large cuts in other programs at all levels of government. The rapidly rising cost of government health care is, in large part, a consequence of design flaws in public health programs.”—Chapter One, pp. 13-14
Hoover Institution added this note
“Reducing wasteful spending and inefficient regulation will reduce uninsurance. We estimate that our reforms will provide insurance to at least 7 million—and perhaps as many as 21 million—currently uninsured people.” From the Introduction, p. 7
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