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DH-0217

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Published by The Delphos Herald
DELPHOS
The
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Project Recycle set Saturday

Upfront

COLUMBUS (AP) — Gov. John Kasich scored his first key legislative victory Wednesday as lawmakers in the House and Senate passed his plan to hand over job creation functions to a nonprofit corporation. The bill sets up a framework for JobsOhio, a privatepublic partnership that would lead the state’s economic development efforts. The measure directs the Department of D
DELPHOS
The
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Facebook & Twitter Fit Farming, Family, p7

Basketball previews, p6

Project Recycle set Saturday

Upfront

COLUMBUS (AP) — Gov. John Kasich scored his first key legislative victory Wednesday as lawmakers in the House and Senate passed his plan to hand over job creation functions to a nonprofit corporation. The bill sets up a framework for JobsOhio, a privatepublic partnership that would lead the state’s economic development efforts. The measure directs the Department of D

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Published by: The Delphos Herald on Feb 17, 2011
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Staff reports
Four Elida High Schoolseniors will represent AllenCounty in the Ohio JuniorMiss Scholarship ProgramFeb. 25-26 in Mount Vernon.Natalie Mason, LauranKahle, Maggie Wheeler andMichele Theodore, alongwith 28 other high schoolseniors, will arrive in MountVernon on Saturday.Mason is the daughterof Randy and Kelly Mason;Kahle is the daughter of Frank and Lynne Kahle;Wheeler is the daughter of Fred and Cathy Wheeler; andTheodore is the daughter of Tim and Susan Theodore II.The red-carpet welcomeis the beginning of a weekfilled with rehearsals, lun-cheons with various serviceorganizations and numerousspeaking opportunities.Cash scholarships totaling$18,000 will be awarded toparticipants. Approximately$2 million in college scholar-ships are also awarded by theprogram.The show starts at 8 p.m.on Feb. 25 and at 7 p.m. onFeb. 26.The 54th annual America’sJunior Miss National Finalswill be held in Mobile, Ala.,in June.Tickets for the MountVernon performances areavailable by e-mailing ohi-odistinguishedyw.org or call-ing 740-399-5206.
T
hursday
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17, 2011
D
ELPHOS
H
ERALD
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50¢ dailyDelphos, Ohio
Telling The Tri-County’s Story Since 1869
Facebook & Twitter Fit Farming, Family, p7 Basketball previews, p6
UpfrontSports
Forecast
Obituaries 2State/Local 3Politics 4Community 5Sports 6-7Farm 7Classifieds 8TV 9
Index
Friday highin mid 50swith 30 per-cent chanceof showers. See page 2.
Project Recycleset Saturday
Delphos Project Recycleis set for 9-11:30 a.m.Saturday at DelphosFuel and Wash north of Double A Trailer Saleson East Fifth Street.Newspaper, phone booksand aluminum cans needto be in separate contain-ers because they are storedon location and sold asa fundraiser for the GirlScouts and Squires.All other items aretaken to the Van WertRecycle Center.Cardboard, magazines andplastic shopping bags alsoneed to be separated. All tin,plastic and glass contain-ers need to be rinsed clean.Labels can be left on itemsand they can be co-mingled.No window or plateglass, nor light bulbs, orna-mental, Pyrex or cookwareglass will be accepted.Computers, etc., arealso accepted but nomonitors or TVs.
Lawmakers passJobsOhio bill
By ANN SANNERThe Associated Press
COLUMBUS (AP) —Gov. John Kasich scored hisfirst key legislative victoryWednesday as lawmakers inthe House and Senate passedhis plan to hand over job cre-ation functions to a nonprofitcorporation.The bill sets up a frame-work for JobsOhio, a private-public partnership that wouldlead the state’s economicdevelopment efforts. The mea-sure directs the Department of Development’s interim direc-tor, Mark Kvamme, to reviewthe duties that his state agencyperforms and what could betransferred to the new entity.The Republican-led Senatepassed the bill on a 31-2 voteafter lawmakers changed it toaddress some questions aboutethics and public access. TheHouse, which had approvedan earlier version, agreed tothe changes on a 60-35 vote. Itnow goes to Kasich, who willsign the measure Friday, hisoffice said.“Ohio must embrace new,innovative job-creation meth-ods, and with JobsOhio wewill be able to pursue eco-nomic opportunities otherwiseunattainable through our out-dated development structure,”the Republican governor wrotein a statement.Under the Senate revisions,the nine-member JobsOhioboard that Kasich chairs andselects would have to reporttravel expenses paid for bycorporations. The bill wouldrequire notices of the board’spublic meetings, and meetingsummaries would be releasedafterward.Many public records, openmeetings and ethics lawswould not apply to the enti-ty. The changes came afterthe proposal drew heat frommostly Democratic lawmakerswho said it would keep tax-payers in the dark as the boardnegotiates with businesses toattract employers to Ohio andretain jobs.State Sen. Chris Widener,a Springfield Republican whochairs the Senate FinanceCommittee, said the revisionshis panel made now makeclear what JobsOhio could doas a nonprofit and what itwould have to disclose.The changes call forJobsOhio to keep public andprivate funds separate. Thiswould allow the entity toinvest private dollars in a com-pany without any constitution-al problems, Widener said. It’salso prohibited from makingpolitical donations.The Senate amendmentswere enough to assuage con-cerns from some Democratsin that chamber. All but twoof the 10 Senate Democratsvoted to pass the legislation.“We’re at such a point inthis state where we need toaggressively pursue ideas tocreate jobs,” said state Sen.Eric Kearney, D-Cincinnati.“No bill is perfect.”Most of Kearney’sDemocratic colleagues in theHouse said the Senate revi-sions did not go far enough.“I still think we’re drivingin the dark,” said Rep. MattLundy, D-Elyria. “JobsOhio is afertile ground for corruption.”Rep. Robert Mecklenborg,R- Green Township, said itwas time for the opposingparty to get on board withthe plan. Ohio has lost about400,000 jobs during the pastfour years.“We need to get rid of thenaysayers and the doomsayersand get on with the businessof this state and that is the cre-ation of jobs,” Mecklenborgsaid. “It is going to take a lotto right this ship of state andthis is the first step.”Catherine Turcer, of thegovernment watchdog groupOhio Citizen Action, called thechanges an “improvement,”but added that she still hadconcerns about the public’saccess to documents, such asthe financial disclosure state-ments the JobsOhio boardmembers and other officerswould be required to file.The Senate changes clari-fied that board membersand senior-level employeeswould have to disclose theirfinances with the Ohio EthicsCommission, just as universitytrustees do. However, the dis-closure forms that detail theirbusiness holdings and sourcesof income of more than $500would be kept confidential.If the commission identifiesany conflict of interest, thosewould be made public.
Ottoville teachersto train on iPads
BY NANCY SPENCERnspencer@delphosherald.com
OTTOVILLE — Studentshere will enjoy a two-hourdelay Friday. Teachers willget instruction on the newiPads Ottoville Local Schoolswill receive through the fed-eral Race to the Top Grant,Technology CoordinatorShelley Mumaw told schoolboard members Wednesday.A Northwest OhioEducational TechnologyFoundation representativewill lead the instruction.Teachers will learn aboutassessment applications andprograms that help studentsmeet state indicators.The district will receive20 iPads later this year. Theschool will receive $100,000over four years through thegrant.The School board accept-ed a $500 donation from theDelphos Eagles Aerie 471to the athletic departmentfor establishing the FanningHowey Scholarship Fund toaccommodate the $500 schol-arship Treasurer Bob Weberwon at the Ohio SchoolBoards Capital Conference.Board members alsoapproved Cody DeLong,Travis Maag, LoganKortokrax, Zach Weber andJacob Turnwald as studentworkers for the upcomingsummer. They will oper-ate mowers as well as otherschool equipment and willbe paid the state minimumwage.High School Principal JonThorbahn announced juniorhigh and high school studentsparticipated in the school sci-ence fair Wednesday. Thosewith high enough ratings willattend the county science fairSaturday at Continental HighSchool.He also named studentschosen for the All-CountyBand and Choir, which willperform at 2 p.m. Feb. 27at Miller City High School.Students include: AprilHorstman, Nathan Turnwald,Ryan Kemper, Kara Hoersten,Taylor Hoersten, JamesTiller, Audrey Rieger, Amy
4 Elida seniorsto vie for OhioJunior Missscholarships
MasonTheodoreWheelerKahle
Studentscelebrate 100thday of school 
Students at St. John’sElementary School celebrat-ed their 100th day of classesthis year on Wednesday.Children strung 100 fruitloops on necklaces, playedgames and wore 100th-day-themed glasses and hats.Right: Dillon Cross stringscereal for his necklace.Below: Caden Wright showsoff his 100th-day bounty.Bottom: Alexis Skym fills inthe blanks on a 100th-dayworksheet.
Photos submitted
“We’re at such apoint in this statewhere we needto aggressivelypursue ideas tocreate jobs. Nobill is perfect.”
State Sen. Eric Kearney,D-Cincinnati
Jennings girls start timecorrected
The Fort Jennings at MillerCity girls basketball game forFriday will be a varsity-onlycontest starting at 7 p.m.
Jefferson 5th/6th-gradeboys tourney slated
Jefferson boys basket-ball coach Marc Smith andstaff have scheduled the 6thannual Wildcat 5th- and 6th-Grade Tournament to be heldon April 9-10 at the JeffersonMiddle and High schools.There will be separate divi-sions for 5th- and 6th-gradeteams. Each is guaranteed aminimum of 3 games. Entryfee for this event is $100.For more information,contact Ron Ebbeskotte at(419) 692-7191 or CoachSmith at (419) 615-7233.
TODAY
Girls Basketball (6 p.m.):Jefferson at Columbus Grove(NWC); St. John’s at FortRecovery (MAC); McCombat Ottoville; Pauldingat Spencerville (NWC);Lincolnview at Allen East(NWC); Elida at Defiance(WBL); Continental atKalida (PCL); Crestview atAda (NWC); Van Wert atOttawa-Glandorf (WBL).Boys Basketball: Perryat Fort Jennings, 6 p.m.(ppd from Feb. 5)Co-Ed Swimmingand Diving: DistrictDiving at BGSU, TBA
FRIDAY
Boys Basketball (6 p.m.);Columbus Grove at Jefferson(NWC); Spencerville atPaulding (NWC); AllenEast at Lincolnview (NWC);Defiance at Elida (WBL);Kalida at Continental (PCL);Ada at Crestview (NWC);Ottawa-Glandorf at Van Wert(WBL); Fort Recovery at St.John’s (MAC), 6:30 p.m.Girls Basketball: FortJennings at Miller City(PCL), 7 p.m. (V only)
See OTTOVILLE, page 2
 
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Students can pick up theirawards in their school offices.St. John’s Scholar of theDay is TrevorKroeger.CongratulationsTrevor!Jefferson’s Scholar of theDay is VictoriaSuever.CongratulationsVictoria!
Scholars of the Day
2 The Herald Thursday, February 17, 2011
For The Record
www.delphosherald.com
O
BITUARY
B
IRTH
L
OTTERYL
OCAL PRICES
W
EATHER
P
OLICEREPORT
The Delphos Herald wantsto correct published errors inits news, sports and featurearticles. To inform the news-room of a mistake in publishedinformation, call the editorialdepartment at 419-695-0015.Corrections will be publishedon this page.
C
orreCtions
The DelphosHerald
Vol. 141 No. 209
Nancy Spencer, editorRay Geary, general managerDelphos Herald, Inc.Don Hemple,advertising manager
Tiffany Brantley
,circulation managerThe Daily Herald (USPS 15258000) is published daily exceptSundays and Holidays.By carrier in Delphos andarea towns, or by rural motorroute where available $2.09 perweek. By mail in Allen, VanWert, or Putnam County, $105per year. Outside these counties$119 per year.Entered in the post officein Delphos, Ohio 45833 asPeriodicals, postage paid atDelphos, Ohio.No mail subscriptions will beaccepted in towns or villageswhere The Daily Herald papercarriers or motor routes providedaily home delivery for $2.09per week.405 North Main St.TELEPHONE 695-0015Office Hours8 a.m.-5 p.m. Mon.-Fri.POSTMASTER:Send address changesto THE DAILY HERALD,405 N. Main St.Delphos, Ohio 45833
WeAtHer ForeCAstt-cuyAcad PtoniGHt
: Mostly cloudywith a 50 percent chance of showers. Lows in the lower50s. Southwest winds 15 to 20mph with gusts up to 30 mph.
FriDAY
: Mostly cloudy.A chance of showers in themorning. Highs in the mid50s. West winds 15 to 20 mph.Chance of rain 30 percent.
FriDAY niGHt
: Partlycloudy in the evening becom-ing mostly clear. Lows in theupper 20s. West winds 10 to15 mph.
eXtenDeD ForeCAstsAtUrDAY
: Mostlysunny in the morning becom-ing partly cloudy. Highs inthe mid 40s. West winds 5 to10 mph.Corn: $6.76Wheat: $7.52Beans: $13.34
st. ritA’s
A girl was born Feb. 16 toChad and Rachelle Unverferthof Kalida.High temperatureWednesday in Delphos was49 degrees, low was 31. Higha year ago today was 31, lowwas 23. Record high for todayis 58, set in 1998. Record lowis -12, set in 1973.
Delphos weather
CLEVELAND (AP) —These Ohio lotteries weredrawn Wednesday:
Clac L
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Mdday 3
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8-8-4-6
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3-5-3-7
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09-13-21-23-48,Powerball: 24, Power Play: 2Estimated jackpot: $101million
rllg Cah 5
18-21-22-25-39Estimated jackpot:$110,000
t oH
03-04-09-13-25-26-29-32-38-42-44-50-51-56-59-64-66-69-76-79
t oH Mdday
03-05-07-09-10-14-25-27-29-32-36-40-43-44-54-56-64-66-69-79
Aw  Wdday’ qu:
Bill Clinton’s Secret Service code name Eagle wasshared by TV’s fictional president “Jed” Bartlet in “TheWest Wing.”Oklahoma has more man-made lakes than any other.It has more than 200 created by building dams acrossstreams. Its only natural lakes are shallow playas andoxbows.
tday’ qu:
What futuristic 1948 car had a center headlight thatturned with the steering wheel?What famous classical composer, suing the pseud-onym Monsier Croche, wrote articles criticizing thecultural life of his time?
Aw  Fday’ Hald.tday’ wd:Fuau:
vain, useless
Yawhlp:
the bartailed godwit
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At 7:06 a.m. a collisionoccurred when the driver of one vehicle backed from a pri-vate drive and struck a secondparked vehicle.Drew Kimmett, 44, of Delphos, was backing outof his drive at 428 S. MainSt. into the east/west alley.Kimmett failed to see a sec-ond vehicle parked at 410 S.Main St. on the roadside of the alley and struck it on theright side.There were no injuries andminor damage to Kimmett’svehicle, moderate damage to thesecond vehicle. Kimmett wascited for improper backing.
Driver strikesvehicle in alley
At 11:07 a.m. on Tuesday,a collision occurred when thedriver of one vehicle failedto stop at a red light and wasstruck by a second vehicle.Dennis King, 53, of Delphos, was traveling west-bound in the 400 block of East Fifth Street when hemoved through the intersec-tion at Pierce Street on agreen light. Jeanette Roehm,73, of Delphos, was headednorthbound on Pierce Streetwhen she came to the FifthStreet intersection, failed tosee the red light and proceed-ed through the intersection.Roehm was struck by King,who had the right of way.There were no injuriesand minor damage to King’svehicle, moderate damage toRoehm’s.Roehm was cited for a redlight violation.
Crash resultsfrom red lightviolation
LONDON (AP) — AnIraqi man whose testimony theUnited States used as a keyevidence to build a case forwar in Iraq says he is proudthat he lied about his countrydeveloping mobile biologicalwarfare labs.The Guardian newspa-per published an interviewWednesday with Rafid AhmedAlwan al-Janabi, who has beenidentified as the informer called“Curveball,” whose claimsabout weapon labs formed partof then-U.S. Secretary of StateColin Powell’s speech to theU.N. Security Council in 2003,shortly before the war began.The Guardian quoted al-Janabi as saying: “I had thechance to fabricate somethingto topple the regime. I and mysons are proud of that.”Although some intelli-gence agents were skepticalof Curveball’s story, the U.S.Senate Intelligence Committeereported in 2004 that theCentral Intelligence Agency“withheld important informa-tion about Curveball’s reliabil-ity” from analysts dealing withthe case.The Guardian interviewedal-Janabi in Karlsruhe,Germany, in a mixture of Arabic and German. The U.S.Senate panel’s report saidCurveball spoke in English andArabic when he was interro-gated by intelligence officers.Asked about his feeling’sabout the deaths and destruc-tion during the war and in theyears following, The Guardiansaid al-Janabi said there was noother way.“I tell you something whenI hear anybody not just in Iraqbut in any war (is) killed, I amvery sad. But give me anoth-er solution. Can you give meanother solution?” the newspa-per quoted him as saying.“Saddam did not (allow)freedom in our land,” theIraqi said. “There are no otherpolitical parties. You have tobelieve what Saddam says, anddo what Saddam wants. And Idon’t accept that. I have to dosomething for my country. SoI did this and I am satisfied,because there is no dictator inIraq any more.”
Cuvball: i’m pud myWMD l ld  wa  iaq
(Cud fm pag 1)
Brianna Rodriguez, TimFeasel, Bridget Miller andAbby Siefker.Superintendent andElementary School PrincipalScott Mangas announced theMath Olypmics for third-graders will be held onTuesday.In other business, theboard:
• Approved the use of the
school for the Big GreenAthletic Boosters for itsannual fifth- and sixth-gradebasketball tournament April1-3; and
• Approved daffodil and
raffle ticket fundraisers forNational Honor Society.Proceeds will be donated tothe Cancer Walk later in theschool year.The next meeting willbegin at 7:30 p.m. March16.
rchad A. nagl
Richard Anthony Nagel,55, passed away at 7 p.m. Jan.30 at his residence in Byron,Ill.A memorial service will beheld at 4 p.m. Saturday at St.Peter Lutheran Church, fol-lowed by a prayer service at5:45 p.m. and military honorsat 6 p.m.Mr. Nagel was the son of the late Eugene and Nanette(Himmeger) Nagel. He mar-ried Michelle Arnette, of Delphos, on Sept. 9, 1979.He was a 1974 SpencervilleHigh School graduate whowas employed by Sundstrand(formerly Westinghouse).He is survived by his wifeof 31 years and children,Kristin Richelle, Shane Travisand Brianna Leigh of Byron,Ill.; brothers Dan “Mike”(Kelly) Nagel of Dayton, Jim(Ann) Nagel of Delphos andEugene “Pete” (Nicole) Nagelof Manchester, Tenn.; sistersDiana Ream of Bellevue,Mary (Jerry) Looser and Lisha(Duane) Dickrede of Delphosand Nancy Jo (Steve) Gordonof Convoy.
ovll
A ranch owner in FortKeogh, Mont., discovered thelargest reported snowflake inJanuary of 1887. It measured15 inches wide and eightinches thick.FORT LAUDERDALE,Fla. (AP) — A state workermade the alarming discov-ery: a 10-year-old boy in thefront seat of an exterminator’sred pickup alongside a busyinterstate, convulsing fromseizures, dripping in chemi-cals so toxic they sickenedrescue workers. Nearby, theboy’s father lay on the ground,unresponsive and doused ingasoline in what he later toldpolice was a futile attempt tokill himself.The most horrifying findwould come hours laterbecause the truck was tootoxic to search — the dete-riorating body of the boy’stwin sister, wrapped in plasticbags, wedged between chemi-cal containers in the enclosedpickup bed.The boy was in criti-cal condition Wednesday,his burns, mostly below thewaist, getting worse and doc-tors unsure of what chemicalwas used. His father, JorgeBarahona, was also in thehospital. He faces aggravatedchild abuse charges, but morewere expected.Meanwhile, an angry judgegrilled state child welfare offi-cials over missed opportunitiesto help the twins, Victor andNubia, after an anonymousabuse allegation was calledinto a hotline Feb. 10 — fourdays before the children werefound by the highway assis-tance worker along Interstate95 in West Palm Beach.The caller said the twins’feet and hands were boundwith duct tape and they werekept in a bathtub as punish-ment. Child welfare officialsalso believe the girl was beingstarved.The state officials describeda disturbing picture of a Jorgeand Carmen Barahona, whoadopted the twins, an 11-year-old autistic boy and a 7-year-old girl from foster care. Thecouple has been the focus of at least three abuse allegationsin the past several years, butnothing ever came of them.
Girl dead in toxic truck; brother burned
 
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St. John’sPreschool OpenHouse andRegistration
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6:00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m.Wednesday, Feb. 23
St. John’s Annex722 S. Jefferson St., Delphos
Give your child the opportunity to begin their schoolexperience in a comfortable environment withcaringteachers who utilize innovative teaching toolsto prepare students for kindergarten whileemphasizing Christian values.
For information, call 419-692-9806
Licensed by the Ohio Department of Education
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Thursday, February 17, 2011 The Herald –3
S
TATE
/L
OCAL
www.delphosherald.com
EarthTalk
®
From the Editors of E/TheEnvironmental MagazineDear EarthTalk: What’sthe latest research on thequestion of whether cellphone use causes cancer?— William Thigpen, viae-mail
Cell phones have onlybeen in widespread use for acouple of decades, which isfar too short a time for us toknow conclusively whetheror not using them could causecancer. Research thus farappears to indicate that mostof us have little if anything toworry about.According to the feder-ally funded National CancerInstitute, the low-frequencyelectromagnetic radiation thatcell phones give off when wehold them up to our headsis “non-ionizing,” meaningit cannot cause significanthuman tissue heating or bodytemperature increases thatcould lead to direct damageto cellular DNA. By con-trast, X-rays consist of high-frequency ionizing electro-magnetic radiation and canlead to the kind of cellulardamage resulting in cancer.Nonetheless, some cell phoneusers and researchers stillworry about our cell phoneusage, given how much wenow use them and how littlewe know about their potentiallong-term effects.The reason the issue keepscoming up is that some ini-tial studies in Europe, wherecell phone usage caught ona decade before the U.S.,showed links between someforms of tumors and heavycell phone usage. As a result,researchers teamed up to do amore definitive study, calledthe “Interphone” study,across 13 countries between2000 and 2004. The results,published in May 2010 in thepeer-reviewed InternationalJournal of Epidemiology,indicated no increased riskof developing two of themost common types of braintumors, glioma and menin-gioma, from typical everydaycell phone usage. Study par-ticipants who reported spend-ing the most time on theirphones showed a slightlyincreased risk of developinggliomas, but researchers con-sidered this finding inconclu-sive due to factors such asrecall bias, whereby partici-pants with brain tumors mayhave simply remembered pastcell phone use differentlyfrom healthy respondents.Researchers looking to getpast the relatively short tim-ing window and the recall biasissues of the Interphone studyrecently launched a longerterm study, dubbed COSMOS(short for Cohort Study onMobile Communications),in Europe. Some 250,000cell phone users betweenthe ages of 18 and 69 andlocated in Britain, Finland,the Netherlands, Sweden andDenmark will participate byallowing researchers to tracktheir cell phone usage andhealth over three decades.According to an April 22,2010 article in Reuters, thestudy will factor in the use of hands-free devices and howpeople carry their phones andwill also be on the lookoutfor links to neurological dis-eases such as Parkinson’s andAlzheimer’s.There are some precau-tions you can take to mini-mize whatever risk may exist.The Federal CommunicationsCommission (FCC) sug-gests reserving the use of cell phones for shorter con-versations, or for timeswhen a conventional phoneisn’t available. Also, usinga hands-free device placesmore distance between thephone and your head, signifi-cantly reducing the amountof radiation exposure. If thefact that many states requirehands-free devices for usinga cell phone while drivingisn’t enough to make yougo out and spend the extramoney on such an accessory,maybe the cancer risk, per-ceived or real, will.
Dear EarthTalk: In hisrecent State of the UnionAddress, President Obamacalled for a million electricvehicles on American roadsby 2015. How likely is itthat we’ll attain that goal?— Jerry Mitlitski, Salem, OR
“We can break our depen-dence on oil … and becomethe first country to have onemillion electric vehicles onthe road by 2015,” PresidentObama said in his January2011 State of the Unionaddress. “The future is oursto win.”It’s difficult to say howlikely such an arbitrary goalmight be, but green leadersand others are optimistic. Thewaiting list for the new elec-tric Nissan Leaf, rolling off the factory floor as we speak,is some 20,000 Americanslong. The auto industryexpects similar demand forother new electric and plug-in hybrid cars hitting U.S.roads this year and nextfrom General Motors, Ford,Toyota, Mitsubishi and oth-ers.Of course, the Obamaadministration realizes thatattaining such a goal willbe impossible without helpfrom the federal government.To that end, consumers andbusinesses can get tax creditsworth up to $7,500 on thepurchase of each new elec-tric vehicle (EV). The fedshave also committed $2.4 bil-lion for research and devel-opment into improving EVbatteries, and another $115million for the installationof EV charging infrastruc-ture in 16 different metroareas around the country—not to mention some $300million in clean cities grantsto dozens of American com-munities working to reducepetroleum use, and the $25billion being doled out tohelp U.S. automakers retool.So much federal involvementhas helped spur state govern-ments and private industry tomake significant investmentsin the EV sector as well.But even with all thisfunding, a million EVson the road by 2015 maystill be just a pipe dream.James Sweeney of StanfordUniversity’s Precourt EnergyEfficiency Center calls theplan “very aggressive.” Hereasons that it took over adecade for hybrids—which“did not require any differ-ence in infrastructure andhad as great a range as con-ventional vehicles, neither of which is likely to be the casewith electric vehicles”—tocapture three percent of theU.S. passenger car and lighttruck market. EVs wouldhave to achieve the same mar-ket share in just four years if Obama’s goal is to be real-ized. “Even with a large sub-sidy, it would be very hard tomove to such a large marketshare that quickly,” Sweeneyconcludes.The ElectrificationCoalition, an organization of pro-EV business leaders fromcompanies including Nissan,Federal Express, CodaAutomotive and CoulombTechnologies, would takeissue with that conclu-sion, however. The group’sNovember 2009 study,dubbed the ElectrificationRoadmap, predicted thatas many as 14 million EVscould be on American roadsby 2020 if lawmakers create“electrification ecosystems”in several major U.S. citiessimultaneously. If the groupis anywhere near the mark,reaching Obama’s goal of amillion EVs by 2015 shouldbe a no-brainer. The groupalso says that EVs couldaccount for as many as 75percent of all miles driven bylight duty vehicles in the U.S.by 2040.Now if only we could cleanup our supply of electricitytoo, then we really might beonto something good for theplanet…
Send your environmen-tal questions to: EarthTalk®,c/o E – The Environmental  Magazine, P.O. Box 5098,Westport, CT 06881; earth-talk@emagazine.com.
By DAN SEWELLAssociated Press
EVENDALE — Folksinvolved with the GE Aviationplant in southwest Ohio areused to being in the targetsights of Washington budget-cutters, but the latest shot at akey project here has hit hard.The Republican-controlledHouse voted Wednesdayto cancel $450 million foran alternative engine beingdeveloped for the F-35 fighter jet. The vote backed BarackObama’s administration andthe Pentagon in saying thatthe GE Aviation-Rolls Royce joint project can be sacrificedin the effort to rein in the fed-eral deficit.President George W.Bush’s administration hadsaid the same thing, butthe House — with backingfrom Ohio political leadersincluding now-Speaker JohnBoehner — had kept fundingthe program. Boehner’s dis-trict neighbors the plant.Word of the vote spreadquickly in this northernCincinnati suburb just off of Interstate 75.“It’s sad. It could hurt,”said John Pollock, a GE retir-ee. But he said he wasn’tsurprised.“We have to cut moneysomewhere,” he said.Jeff Famble, whose wifeworks at GE, said losing theproject would be at a bad time.“Ohio is one of the statesthat needs jobs the most. We’retrying to get the economygoing,” Famble said. “I don’tknow what’s going on behindthe scenes in Washington, butI know what the scene is here:We need jobs. You’ve got totake care of your backyard.”Some 1,000 jobs, includ-ing GE employees and sub-contractors, are linked to theproject in the Cincinnati area,GE Aviation spokesman RickKennedy said. The GeneralElectric Co. division has longbeen a major player in thesouthwest Ohio economy. Itstill has some 7,500 employ-ees in the region, though that’sless than half of what it had inCold War days.Kennedy said the work-ers will keep going on theproject.“They will continue tountil we get this resolved. It’sa setback, but it’s not over,”Kennedy said. “We will takethis fight to the Senate.”Republican Rep. SteveChabot, whose districtincludes the plant, pledgedWednesday to keep battlingfor funding, as did Ohio Sen.Sherrod Brown, a Democrat.
Ohio GE Aviation plantwill battle on for funding
COLUMBUS — Ata press conference at theOhio Statehouse, StateRepresentative Matt Huffman(R-Lima) today unveiled leg-islation to reform and expandschool choice within thestate of Ohio. When enacted,this bill will extend privateschool options to more low-and middle-income families,as well as open eligibility tofamilies currently attendingprivate school who are mak-ing sacrifices to pay tuition.The legislation will eliminatethe failing schools model asthe determining factor whenchoosing voucher recipients.“All Ohio families shouldhave choices to decide whateducation gives their chil-dren the best opportunity,”Huffman said. “It is my intentto open doors to more studentsby combining the Clevelandand Ed Choice voucher pro-grams. This program has nocap on the number of vouch-ers statewide.”Specifically, Rep.Huffman’s legislationwill designate scholarshipamounts that are 80 percentof the amount of the stateshare of education and varybased on the income level of the family. When a studentwho currently attends a pub-lic school utilizes the scholar-ship, the difference betweenthe full state funding amount($5,783) and the scholarshipamount (which may offer$1,157 to $3,470 per student)will render considerable sav-ings to the state.Huffman’s legislationwill also create the SpecialEducation ScholarshipProgram to provide scholar-ships for disabled children ingrades K-12 to attend alterna-tive public or private specialeducation programs.“No child should be deniedaccess to any school choiceoptions that best meets theirlearning needs,” Huffmansaid. “Above all, this legis-lation is designed to extendprivate school choice to morelower- and middle-incomefamilies who have eithernever had a choice or havebeen making tremendous sac-rifices to make that choice.”If the school’s annualtuition is less than the stu-dent’s maximum scholar-ship amount, the savings willbe rolled into an EducationSavings Account for the indi-vidual child, which wouldalso encourage parents to findthe best value for their child’seducation. Parents may usethe education savings accountto pay for private schooltuition and fees, school orcollege textbooks, or tuitionand fees at an Ohio college,university or post-high schoolinstitution.“For the first time, manyOhio school parents will havecontrol over how their child’seducation dollar is spent,”said Huffman.Participating privateschools must be chartered bythe state or have a letter of approval from the state, or bein the state chartering processand post a surety bond or let-ter of credit. Additionally, stu-dents must take the same stateassessments that are requiredof public school students,and the Ohio Department of Education is required to col-lect and report assessmentdata in the same manner thatis required of public schools.This legislation will soonbe referred to a House com-mittee, where it will undergofurther debate and consider-ation.
Huffman proposesschool choice bill
“For the firsttime, many Ohioschool parentswill have controlover how theirchild’s educationdollar is spent.”
— Rep. Matt Huffman,R-Lima

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