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Pennsylvania Group 2 - Jan 2009

Pennsylvania Group 2 - Jan 2009

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Published by CAP History Library
Civil Air Patrol
Civil Air Patrol

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Published by: CAP History Library on Feb 18, 2011
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01/31/2013

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   C   I   V   I   L    A   I   R    P   A   T   R   O   L 
JANUARY 2009
PENNSYLVANIA WING — GROUP 2
INSIDE THIS ISSUE: SAFETY BRIEF-ING
2
COMMANDER’SCORNER
3
PILOT’S LOUNGE
3
 SO, WHERE DOWE GO FROMHERE?
4
MINI— ENCAMPMENT
5
WEBMASTER’SGUIDE
7
UNIT NEWS
8— 9
 STAFF ROSTERAND CALENDAR
10
RECURRENTCOMMUNICA-TIONS QUIZ
6
PROMOTIONSAND WELCOME
8
UPCOMINGEVENTS
5— 6
LESSONS FROMGEESE
9GROUP 2NUMBERS:
Senior Members : 185
Cadets: 151
Total Members: 336
This information is as of31 December 2009
COMMANDER: LT COL BYRON MARSHALL
On Monday, November 17th,2008, as light snow was fal-ling from the skies, nine ca-dets and seven senior mem-bers from the Hegins, Pa.based Black Diamond Com-posite Squadron 336 of theCivil Air Patrol, 31st Pennsyl-vania Wing, pulled up in frontof the Lycoming Aircraft En-gine Plant in Williamsport, Pa.What happened next was ahistoric first step when thegroup from 336 entered theLycoming Plant, as this wasthe first time anyone fromCivil Air Patrol has visited thefacility. After signing in withreceptionists Joy Gephart andDebbie Trimble they visitedLycoming’s onsite museum,where they were introducedto Lycoming’s storied history.The CAP Members were thenintroduced to Lycoming’s VicePresident of Operations, DonWagner, who talked with thecadets about their futureaspirations, which might in-clude careers in aviation. Healso talked about Lycoming’spast, present, and future inthe aviation industry.This was followed by a greattour of the entire plant, led bytour guides Ron Crain, PlantCommitteeman; Jack Caprio,Senior Web Content Special-ist and Marketing Person;and Dennis Coulbourn, FieldService Engineer. The mem-bers from 336 saw every-
Members of Squadron 336 toured the Lycoming Engine Plant. They are,kneeling, from left to right: Joe Dietrich, 1st Sgt. Ty Waizenegger, CadetCommander Jake Dewees, Tom Dewees, Dakota Deaven, Betty AnnDeaven, Richard Snedden, Nathan Keefer. Standing, from left to right:Steve Bixler PAO, Dave Long, Tristen Miller, Phillip Long, Evan Rajchel,Dave Rajchel, Squadron Commander Captain Todd Daubenspeck, BobMoyer AEO
CIVIL AIR PATROL AND LYCOMING ENGINESCOME FACE TO FACE
thing from how the parts of an engine are produced, tothe actual assembly of en-gines, including the testing and packaging of the finalproduct in preparation forshipment to the consumer.After the tour, everyone againgathered in the museum forphotos, a question and an-swer session, and to givethanks to everyone at Lycom-ing for graciously hosting thishistoric event. The people atLycoming thanked the squad-ron members for attending and invited them to return atanytime.Lycoming is the largest sup-plier of piston driven aircraftengines in the world, withover 70% of all general avia-tion aircraft in the world be-ing powered by Lycoming engines. They also supplyengines to several helicoptermanufacturers.2Lt. Steve Bixler, Public Af-fairs Officer at Squadron336, said “With the exceptionof a few special duty aircraft,most of the aircraft in theCAP Fleet are Cessnas, pow-ered by Lycoming Engines, sothis visit was special for bothLycoming and the Membersof 336. We really learned alot about how aircraft enginesare manufactured, and alsohow Lycoming has come to
Continued on P2,Lycoming Engines
 
 
Page 2
PENNSYLVANIA WING — GROUP 2
JANUARY SAFETY BRIEFING—COLD WEATHER SAFETY 
Exposure to cold can causeinjury or serious illness suchas frostbite or hypothermia.The likelihood of injury orillness depends on factorssuch as physical activity,clothing, wind, humidity,working and living conditions,and a person's age and stateof health. Follow these tips tostay safe in cold weather:
Dress appropriately beforegoing outdoors. The airtemperature does not haveto be below freezing forsomeone to experiencecold emergencies such ashypothermia and frostbite.Wind speed can createdangerously cold condi-tions even when the tem-perature is not that low.
 
If possible, avoid being outside in the coldestpart of the day, or forextended periods of timein extreme cold weather.
 
Dress in layers so youcan adjust to changing conditions. Avoid over-dressing or overexertionthat can lead to heatillness.
 
Most of your body heat islost through your headso wear a hat, preferablyone that covers yourears.
 
Mittens provide morewarmth to your handsthan gloves.
 
Wear waterproof, insu-lated boots to help avoidhypothermia or frostbiteby keeping your feetwarm and dry and tomaintain your footing inice and snow.
 
Take frequent breaksand stay hydrated.
 
Get out of wet clothesimmediately and warmthe core body tempera-ture with a blanket orwarm fluids like hot cideror soup. Avoid drinking caffeine or alcohol if youexpect you or someoneyou are trying to help hashypothermia or frostbite.
Recognize the symptomsof hypothermia that can bea serious medical condi-tion: confusion, dizziness,exhaustion and severeshivering. Seek medicalattention immediately if you have these symptoms.
Recognize frostbite warning signs: gray, white or yellowskin discoloration, numb-ness, waxy feeling skin.Seek medical attentionimmediately if you havethese symptoms.American Red CrossCold Weather Article be the best at what they do.”Squadron Commander, Capt.Todd Daubenspeck, added,“When I called Lycoming tosee about visiting them, I wasreally surprised to find outthat no other squadron hadever visited. I think they wereas excited to have us visit aswe were to go. The profes-sional ties between the twoorganizations goes backmany years, but today’s visitbrings us together on a muchmore personal level. I hopetoday was just the first of many visits by CAP Squad-rons to this great facility.”For more information on Ly-coming Engines, you can log on to:www.lycoming.textron.comFor more information on TheBlack Diamond CompositeSquadron, you can log on to:www.bdcs336cap.comWhile at Lycoming, the groupfrom 336 was informed byLycoming’s Jack Caprio thatthe Piper Aviation Museum islocated just 20 miles up theroad in Lock Haven, Pa. Whileat lunch, a quick phone callto the museum got themscheduled for an afternoontour. Upon arrival at the mu-seum, they were greeted bythe museum staff, Andie Ben-nett, Tour Guide Russ Nelson,and the resident cat, Muffin.(Thanks to Stacy Young forproviding the names.) During the next 90 minutes, theylearned all about the evolu-tion of the Piper Airplane Co.,ending with a walk throughthe hanger, which containsabout seven or eight vintagePiper Planes, including theonly PT1 Trainer Plane Piperever built. (The Departmentof Defense cancelled thecontract before they everwent into production.)For more information on themuseum, you can log on to:
Lycoming Engines,Continued from P1Don Wagner, Vice President of Lycoming, spoke with the cadetsbefore the tour.Tour guides that Squadron 336around the Lycoming plant: fromleft: Dennis Coulbourn, Field Ser-vice Engineer, Ron Crain, PlantCommittee Man, Jack Caprio, Mar-keting and Senior Web Content.
www.pipermuseum.comSo if you are looking for afield trip for your squadron toenhance your Aerospace Edu-cation Program, these aretwo great establishments tovisit that can be seen in thesame day. And while you arethere, tell them the membersof 336 say Hi.2Lt. Steve BixlerPAO BDCS 336 CAP
W
ITH
 
THE
 
EXCEPTION
 
OF
 
A
 
FEW
 
SPECIAL
 
DUTY 
 
AIRCRAFT
,
MOST
 
OF
 
THE
 
AIR-CRAFT
 
IN
 
THE
CAPF
LEET
 
ARE
C
ESSNAS
,
POWERED
 
BY 
L
 YCOM-ING
E
NGINES
 
 
 
cation train, he is always will-ing to step up.I especially want to thank LtCol Marshall, the Group 2Commander. It seems like heis always at work and stillmakes time to run the Group.It seems there is always aproblem or challenge to over-come and he always stepsup.I want to thank the rest of theGroup 2 Staff Team for all of their hard work and I amlooking forward to working with all of you in the future.C. Brandon Parks, Major, CAPDeputy Commander, Group 2get money from wing.I want to thank CaptMcCutcheon, the Group 2Public Affairs Officer. Shehas worked so hard putting the Group 2 newsletter to-gether and lets me knowwhen I need to update theweb page.I want to thank Maj Wilson,the Group 2 Finance Officer.She always makes sure allthe reports are in on timeand lets us know how muchmoney we have.I want to think Capt Inscho,the Group 2 CommunicationOfficer. If you need comm atan activity or need communi-Officer. We are usually onthe phone working on some-thing every week, sometimeseveryday.I want to thank Lt Col Bech-tel, the Group 2 Standardiza-tion and Evaluation Officer.He has done a great job mak-ing sure that O-flight numbershave been coming up andgetting people checked out.He has doubled the numberof both.I want to thank Lt Case, theGroup 2 Safety Officer. Hehas worked a number of hours trying to make sure thesquadrons turn in their safetyreports, so that they will stillI want to thank all of themembers for all of your hardwork and putting so much of your time into Civil Air Patrol.I especially want to thank allof the squadron command-ers. They not only have to dotheir job, but fill all of theother jobs in the squadronthat are open. They give a lotof time with very little in re-turn. They have to make surethat all the reports are turnedinto group and wing eachmonth, deal with any prob-lems that come up, andmake sure the program isrunning smoothly.I want to thank Lt Roth, theGroup 2 Emergency Services
COMMANDER’S CORNER
Page 3
PENNSYLVANIA WING — GROUP 2
recorded (marked with an S)by maintenance engineers.By the way, Qantas is the onlymajor airline that has neverhad an accident.Enjoy!P: Left inside main tire al-most needs replacement.S: Almost replaced left insidemain tire.P: Test flight OK, except auto-land very rough.S: Auto-land not installed onthis aircraft.P: Something loose in cock-pit.S: Something tightened incockpit.P: Dead bugs on windshield.S: Live bugs on backorder.
PILOT’S LOUNGE
Introducing a new feature!The Pilot’s Lounge is for arti-cles by, about, or of interestto our flying members. Pleasefeel free to contribute.To kick this off, I’m present-ing an oldie, but goodie.After every flight, Qantas pi-lots fill out a form, called a"gripe sheet," which tells me-chanics about problems withthe aircraft. The mechanicscorrect the problems; docu-ment their repairs on theform, and then pilots reviewthe gripe sheets before thenext flight. Never let it be saidthat ground crews lack asense of humor.Here are some actual mainte-nance complaints submittedby Qantas' pilots (markedwith a P) and the solutionsP: Autopilot in altitude-holdmode produces a 200 feetper minute descent.S: Cannot reproduce problemon ground.P: Evidence of leak on rightmain landing gear.S: Evidence removed.P: DME volume unbelievablyloud.S: DME volume set to morebelievable level.P: Friction locks cause throt-tle levers to stick.S: That's what they're for.P: IFF inoperative.S: IFF always inoperative inOFF mode.P: Suspected crack in wind-shield.S: Suspect you're right.P: Number 3 engine missing.S: Engine found on right wing after brief search.P: Aircraft handles funny.S: Aircraft warned tostraighten up, fly right, andbe serious.P: Target radar hums.S: Reprogrammed target ra-dar with lyrics.P: Mouse in cockpit.S: Cat installed.And the best one for last...P. Noise coming from underinstrument panel. Soundslike a midget pounding onsomething with a hammer.S: Took hammer away frommidget.

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