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Pennsylvania Group 2 - Mar 2009

Pennsylvania Group 2 - Mar 2009

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Published by CAP History Library
Civil Air Patrol
Civil Air Patrol

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Published by: CAP History Library on Feb 18, 2011
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01/31/2013

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   C   I   V   I   L   A   I   R    P   A   T   R   O   L
MARCH 2009
PENNSYLVANIA WING GROUP 2
INSIDE THIS ISSUE:
GROUP 2NUMBERS:

Senior Members : 194

Cadets: 151

Total Members: 345

This information is as of1 March 2009
COMMANDER: LT COL BYRON MARSHALL
January 5, 2009
—The U.S.military demonstrationsquadrons have announcedtheir 2009 air show sea-sons.TheThunderbirds, the AirForce squadron, are enter-ing their 56
th
season andwill perform 73 shows in 30locations in the UnitedSates, Puerto Rico and theFar East. They perform inF16-C Fighting Falcons.
 
TheBlue Angels, the U.S.Navy squadron, are enteringtheir 63
rd
season, and arescheduled to perform 67shows at 34 sites through-out the United States andCanada. In addition, theteam’s practices can bewatched at theMuseum ofNaval AviationatNAS Pen-sacola, which includes aviewing area for visitors.They perform in theF/A-18Hornet.
 
Both squadrons consist ofmore than the pilots flyingthe planes. The Thunder-birds, for example, consistsof 12 officers —six pilots,an operations officer, narra-tor/advance pilot, flight sur-
 
THUNDERBIRDS AND BLUE ANGELSANNOUNCE 2009 SCHEDULE
geon, executive officer,maintenance officer and apublic affairs officer —andmore than 120 enlistedairmen. The numbers aresimilar for the Blue Angels.Full Article The shows listed below arewithin 5 1/2 hours drivefrom the Harrisburg, PAArea
Thunderbirds show schedule
 
May
 15-17 Andrews AFB, Md. (2.5hrs)23-24 Wantagh, NY (JonesBeach) (4 hrs)
June
13-14 Ocean City, Md. (4.5hrs)20-21 Dover AFB, Del. (3 hrs)
August
8-9 Vienna, Ohio(Youngstown ARB) (4.5 hrs)19 Atlantic City, N.J. (3 hrs)
September
5-7 Cleveland, Ohio (5.5 hrs)
Blue Angels show schedule
 
May
20 & 22 USNA, Annapolis,Md. (2 hrs)23-24 Pax River, Md. (4 hrs)
Last month’s newsletter con-tained an erroneous announce-ment regarding a Command-ers’ Call meeting scheduled for18 April 2009.However, neither Wing, norGroup have confirmed this.We apologize for any inconven-ience this may have caused.
CORRECTION
Thunderbirds (above) and BlueAngels (below) demonstrationsquadrons
June
20-21 Pittsburgh, Pa. (4 hrs)
July
4-5 Binghamton, N.Y. (3 hrs)Thank you to 1stLt Dave Brid-dell for submitting this article.
COMMANDER’SCORNER
2
SAFETY BRIEFING
2
PILOT’S LOUNGE
3
LUNCH WITH HAPARNOLD
4
MINI—ENCAMPMENT
6
WORLD WAR IIWEEKEND
6
RECURRENT COM-MUNICATIONSQUIZ
7
TEAM AMERICAROCKETRY
7
RESPONSIBILITY,DEPENDABILITY,ACCOUNTABILITY
8
UNIT NEWS
9
PROMOTIONS ANDWELCOME
10
FYI’S AND ADS
10
STAFF ROSTERAND CALENDAR
11
 
 Do you want to learn about the F-16 from an F-16 pilot?Do you want to hear from a pilot that served three tours in Iraq?Do you want to have a chance of winning a remote control helicop-ter?Do you want to go to a pizza party?Do you want to fly and do ES training?Then, don't miss the mini encampment and Phase 1 Training witho-flights (Hosted by Group 2) on March 14th at Fort IndiantownGap!All CAP members are welcome!Group 2 staff meeting and CAC meetings will also be held at thesame time.
made a better tomorrow.Thank you!We are currently working onES training, a mini encamp-ment and a AE day. Checkthe web page for updates.gp2.pawg.cap.gov. Alsopleasekeep your email address upto date on e-services, so youdon't miss any emails.Brandon Parks, Major, CAPDeputy Commander, Group 2I want to think you for all ofthe hard work and time youspend in Civil Air Patrol.There are so many of you tothank for all of yourhard work. You all keep eve-rything pushing on to keepthe programs going. I hopeyou know that you have madea difference in otherslives. You help make leaders,you have saved lives, and
Page 2
PENNSYLVANIA WING — GROUP 2
MARCH SAFETY BRIEFING — GROUND HANDLING OF AIRCRAFT
The weather is beginning towarm, and we’re all gettingready for another busy year.It’s easy in the hustle andbustle of planning and help-ing at an event to overlookvital safety aspects. Warmerweather also brings out thehikers and private pilots thatkeep our Emergency Servicespeople so busy.One thing both of these ac-tivities have in common is thepossibility that CAP membersmight be performing groundhandling tasks for aircraft.This might be the excitementand fun at an EAA Fly-In orthe tense bustle of a busy airsearch incident.We talk about Risk Manage-ment, and have made safetybriefings part of our eventpreparations, but we mustalso remember to implementall known safety procedures.The picture at the right showsthe importance of tying downthe tail as well as the wingsof an aircraft.When he saw this photoonline,Lt Col Scott E. Lanis,CAPrecently posted the fol-lowingcomment, “A good tiedown is a mark of a true avia-tion professional. Like every-thing we do in CAP, we needto treat airplanes as thoughwe owned them ourselves. ANAV III 182 is worth about 2Ferraris -- ever see a Ferrariabused by its owner? Ofcourse not! Feel privilegedthat you have an opportunityto operate some world-classequipment and treat it assuch. Please don't be laxabout tying down the air-plane, or in anything else inaviation!”One scene in CAP’s “AircraftGround Handling TrainingVideo” illustrates the impor-tance of setting the brakeeven if you only plan to beout of the aircraft for a shorttime. It also explains anddemonstrates the correctprocedures for moving asmall airplane, and the FlightLine Marshalling signals.Please take the time to viewthe CAP video, and discussthe importance of proper tiedowns as your unit preparesfor this year’s events.Capt Barbara McCutcheon
 
COMMANDER’S CORNER
This aircraft was flipped by agust of windduring a storm.Photoused with permission from Doug Reevesdeltaromeo.com|vansairforce.net 
 
Continued on P3, Mini-Encampment
DONT MISS THE MINI-ENCAMPMENT
 
 
Page 3
PENNSYLVANIA WING — GROUP 2
rescue responders, narrowingthe search area. For moreinformation about the differ-ences between the two ELTs,read “Blind to the satellitesfrom the October 2008AOPA Pilot.“AOPA has worked hard toprevent a mandate to equipwith 406 MHz ELTs in theUnited States,” said AndyCebula, AOPA executive vicepresident of government af-fairs. “The choice to switch tothe 406 MHz ELT remains inthe hands of pilots, who webelieve are best positioned toevaluate their individualsituation and decide whatkind of ELT they need.”U.S. aircraft owners have theoption of replacing their121.5 ELTs with newer mod-els that broadcast on 406MHz. The new ELTs costabout $900 plus installation.Because of AOPA’s efforts,it’s up to aircraft owners andpilots to decide whether to
PILOTS LOUNGE — WHAT'S UP WITH 121.5 MHZ ELTS?
U.S. pilots should bewarethat satellite monitoring of121.5 MHz emergency loca-tor transmitters (ELTs) endson Feb. 1. However, existing121.5 MHz ELTs will continueto meet the FAA’s regulatoryrequirements after that date.Even though the satellites willno longer monitor 121.5 MHzsignals, the search and res-cue community will still re-spond when notified throughother means. ELTs were origi-nally intended to use 121.5MHz to inform air traffic con-trol and pilots monitoring thefrequency of an emergency. Itwill continue to serve in thatrole in a limited capacity,relying on fellow pilots andground-based radio facilitiesto monitor the signals.An upgraded ELT, the 406,will be monitored by satellitesand contains a 121.5 MHzELT within it. When linked toa GPS, it provides precisecoordinates to search andbuy and install new ELTs, usehandheld personal locators,or stick with their existing121.5-based ELTs. Thosewho continue using the121.5 MHz ELT should con-sider carrying other equip-ment such as personal loca-tor beacons, cell phones, orother devices in addition tousing flight plans and radarservices. Pilots should takeas many steps as possible toimprove their chances of be-ing located in case of anemergency.The decision to continue fly-ing with 121.5 MHz ELTs orto upgrade to the 406 MHzELT should be based upon anumber of factors, includingthe type of flying they do, theequipment they carry, andthe type of terrain they over-fly.Full Article By AOPA Publishing staffThank you to 1stLt Dave Brid-dell for submitting this article.
Emergency Locator Transmitter
Philosophy
The school can be the most significant and worthwhile trainingexperience of a CAP cadet's membership. Training is what theschool is all about. To achieve the overall goals, a positive atti-tude is essential. Each staff member has an obligation to learn asmuch as possible and to offer the highest quality of training toothers. The staff must always remember that their first duty is tothe other members and not themselves.Cadet Lt Col Redcay, the cadet commander, has been workingvery hard on the planning for the activity. I am looking forward toall he has put together for the activity. All cadet staff should e-mailCadet Lt Col Redcay at patriot@dejazzd.com for cadet staff posi-tions.C. Brandon Parks, Major, CAPDeputy Commander, Group 2For more information, please see the ad on page 6
Goals
The school is designed to provide cadets the opportunity to:(1) Apply knowledge gained in the cadet programs to practicalsituations.(2) Develop a greater understanding of CAP.(3) Develop leadership potential.(4) Enhance interpersonal skills.(5) Develop time-management skills.(6) Develop a spirit of teamwork.(7) Inspire a sense of discipline.(8) Learn how to overcome challenges and succeed.(9) Enhance their unit's Cadet Program.(10) Aid in retention and motivation.
Mini-Encampment , from P2

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