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Com 490 - Chapter 4 - V2 Analysis of Data Weds 10-11-07

Com 490 - Chapter 4 - V2 Analysis of Data Weds 10-11-07

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05/09/2014

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Chapte r 4
Data Analysis

The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey
instrument. The statement \u201cI hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie
at theaters.\u201d was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since
79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot
to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.

Table 1
\u201cI hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie in theaters.\u201d by
age group.
A
ge
SA
A
N
D
SD
Totals
Under 30
10
(20%)
05
(10%)
5(10%)
15
(30%)
15
(30%)
50 (50%)
30 and above 20
(40%)
20 (40%) 2 (4%)
5
(10%)
3 (6%) 50 (50%)
Total
30
(30%)
25 (25%) 7 (7%) 20
(20%)
18
(18%)
100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely
to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data
was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more
accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole.

Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising.
1

Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more
frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all
advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often
than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they
expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate
enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent
viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended
when it does not fulfill their expectations. H1a: Affluent viewers who find TV advertising
intrusive are expected to dislike TV advertising. H1b: Affluent viewers who are offended by TV
advertising are expected to dislike it more (Alwitt & Prabhaker, 1994) . This idea would connect
the results of Nielson Media Research, 1997 of audience demographics of adult moviegoers that
shows that 44% are in professional managerial positions, 46% are college educated, 46% are
male, 54% are female, 50% of all moviegoers are ages 18-34, 70% combine dining out with
seeing a movie and 79% of all moviegoers are ages 18-49. Since education is often associated
with affluence and income, the household income of the respondent survey was

Data Analysis

The following twelve tables illustrate the data for the Likert statements on the survey
instrument. The statement \u201cI hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie
at theaters.\u201d was cross-tabbed with age, gender, income and education of the respondents. Since

2
79% of all moviegoers are age 18-49 (an overwhelming majority) 30 seemed a good middle spot
to create a demarcation of differing cultural and age differences.
Table 2
\u201cI hate advertisements and commercials that are shown before a movie in theaters.\u201d by
age group.
Gender
SA
A
N
D
SD
Totals
Under 30
10
(20%)
05
(10%)
5(10%)
15
(30%)
15
(30%)
50 (50%)
30 and above 20
(40%)
20 (40%) 2 (4%)
5
(10%)
3 (6%) 50 (50%)
Total
30
(30%)
25 (25%) 7 (7%) 20
(20%)
18
(18%)
100 (100%)

If the results were valid, it could be concluded that adults over age 30 are generally more likely
to be offended by advertising in movie theatres than adults less than 30 years of age. If the data
was from an actual survey, it would also imply that the younger demographic have a more
accepting attitude toward advertising as a whole.

Affluent viewers are popular targets for a lot of advertising, including TV advertising.
Because they are bombarded by promotional messages so often and because they are more
frequent purchasers, affluent consumers are likely to be more jaded in their reactions to all
advertising, including TV advertising. More affluent people tend to watch television less often
than less affluent people (Condry, 1989). When they do watch, presumably it is because they
expect to get gratification from the programming. Those affluent viewers who anticipate
enjoying TV programs are more likely to find TV advertising intrusive. Also, those affluent
viewers who are more sophisticated about television advertising are more likely to be offended

3

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