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CAVE - APWBRRP Final AMP

CAVE - APWBRRP Final AMP

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Published by mark_cave
For my first course towards a MS in Envir-nmental Policy & Management, I had to develop an Adaptive Management Plan (AMP) to address an environmental /ecological problem of my choosing. I had to choose the problem in the first week of the course, before I had any real understanding of the applicability of an AMP approach to the chosen topic...So, an AMP doesn't "fit" as well as other approaches would to my chosen problem - the fact that Camp Arifjan Kuwait relies solely on single serve plastic water bottles as the source of drinking water for the entire population at Arifjan, and the fact that all the emptied bottles - some 1 million per year - are discarded and not recycled.

Even though the AMP I developed, and attached here, won't be the best approach to fixing the problem, I will still use it extensively to draft and present, to Arifjan military leadership, a real proposal for a fix.

To anyone who by chance reads this and my AMP, please send me good luck wishes!
For my first course towards a MS in Envir-nmental Policy & Management, I had to develop an Adaptive Management Plan (AMP) to address an environmental /ecological problem of my choosing. I had to choose the problem in the first week of the course, before I had any real understanding of the applicability of an AMP approach to the chosen topic...So, an AMP doesn't "fit" as well as other approaches would to my chosen problem - the fact that Camp Arifjan Kuwait relies solely on single serve plastic water bottles as the source of drinking water for the entire population at Arifjan, and the fact that all the emptied bottles - some 1 million per year - are discarded and not recycled.

Even though the AMP I developed, and attached here, won't be the best approach to fixing the problem, I will still use it extensively to draft and present, to Arifjan military leadership, a real proposal for a fix.

To anyone who by chance reads this and my AMP, please send me good luck wishes!

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Published by: mark_cave on Feb 22, 2011
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09/11/2013

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The Arifjan plastic water bottle reductionand recycling partnership
Photo credit: http://www.trekearth.com/gallery/photo424646.htm
An Adaptive Management Plan for Use-Reductionand Recycling of Single Serve Plastic Water Bottlesat Camp Arifjan, Kuwait
Course: EVSP501Instructor: Dr. D’AndreaStudent ID: 1055740
 
“If the wars of the 20th century were fought over oil, the wars of the next century will be fought over water.” 
 —Ismail Serageldin, former VP, World Bank, Newsweek, 1995The world is awash in single serve plastic water bottles, up to 80% of which are discarded, ending up inlandfills, as litter that’s easily seen anywhere humans congregate, in oceans and other water bodies, insidethe digestive and other systems (as plastic pieces, or as chemical parts of or releases from those plastic pieces) of the entire hierarchy of sea-life, and in the atmosphere in the form of toxic gases fromincineration. At the same time, there is an ongoing and ever more serious global crisis in the availabilityof safe, clean drinking water. Additionally, there are concomitant and interdependent environmentalcrises; and social, sometimes armed, conflicts arising from obtaining the primary ingredient in the bottles – petroleum.Here are some more specific statistics, from The Container Recycling Institute Website, and links within:
Almost eight out of ten plastic water bottles end up in a landfill or incinerator. Hundreds of millions end up as litter on roads and beaches or in streams and other waterways.
The global consumption of bottled water reached 154 billion liters (41 billion gallons) in 2004, up57 percent from the 98 billion liters consumed five years earlier.
Also, here are additional jaw-dropping facts from the YouTube video,Water Disaster: plastic bottle problem, which cites, amongst other sources, The Earth Policy Institute and OneWorld.net:
Some 28, 000, 000, 000, 000 (28 BILLION) plastic water bottles are consumed in the UnitedStates ALONE per year.
 
o
1500
WATER BOTTLES PER SECOND end up as garbage
o
17,000,000 barrels of oil are required for those 28 Billion bottles EACH YEAR. That’senough oil to fuel about 100,000 cars for a year.
o
2,500,000 tons of CO2 are produced each year to make those bottles
o
$100, 000, 000, 000 (100 BILLION DOLLARS) per year are spent on bottled water 
o
Research shows that for a fraction of the $100 Billion, everyone on the planet could havesafe drinking water and proper sanitation.
Simply put, the global addiction to bottled water must stop. It is unsustainable!
We at Camp Arifjan and other military posts in Kuwait and Southwest Asia are adding to this horrific problem, in direct contradiction to the US Army mission of incorporating sustainability into all aspects of  planning and operations:“Sustainability connects our activities today to those of tomorrow with sound business andenvironmental practices. We have learned over the past decades that simply complyingwith environmental regulations will not ensure that we will be able to sustain our mission.We must strive to become systems thinkers if we are to benefit from the interrelationshipsof the
triple bottom line
of sustainability: mission, environment, and community. To sustainthe future Army we must implement effective policies and practices that safeguard theenvironment and our quality of life in a manner that our nation expects of us.”
1
Following is an Adaptive Management Plan for dramatically reducing the volume of plastic water  bottles used at Camp Arifjan, and for instituting a recycling program for the bottles that remain as part of the mix of drinking water delivery methods.
1
US Army Environmental Command (1 October 2004). The Army Strategy For The Environment: Sustain The Mission, SecureThe Future. Retrieved on 17 February 2011fromwww.asaie. 

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