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48145670 Barriers to Communication

48145670 Barriers to Communication

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Published by Jaffar Ali

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Published by: Jaffar Ali on Feb 22, 2011
Copyright:Attribution Non-commercial

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01/31/2013

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BARRIERS TO COMMUNICATION
 
 
1. Physical barriers
Physical barriers in the workplace include:
y
 
m
arked out territories, e
m
 pires and fiefdo
m
s into which strangers are notallowed
y
 
closed office doors, barrier screens, separate areas for people of differentstatus
y
 
large working areas or working in one unit that is physically separate fro
m
 others.Research shows that one of the
m
ost i
m
 portant factors in building cohesive tea
m
sis proxi
m
ity. As long as people still have a personal space that they can call their own, nearness to others aids co
mm
unication because it helps us get to know oneanother.
2
. Perceptual barriers
The proble
m
with co
mm
unicating with others is that we all see the worlddifferently. If we didn't, we would have no need to co
mm
unicate: so
m
ething likeextrasensory perception would take its place.The following anecdote is a re
m
inder of how our thoughts, assu
m
 ptions and perceptions shape our own realities:A traveller was walking down a road when he
m
et a
m
an fro
m
the next town."Excuse
m
e," he said. "I a
m
hoping to stay in the next town tonight. Can you tell
m
e what the townspeople are like?""Well," said the towns
m
an, "how did you find the people in the last town youvisited?"
 
3
. Emotional barriers
One of the chief barriers to open and free co
mm
unications is the e
m
otional barrier.It is co
m
 prised
m
ainly of fear,
m
istrust and suspicion. The roots of our e
m
otional
m
istrust of others lie in our childhood and infancy when we were taught to becareful what we said to others."Mind your P's and Q's"; "Don't speak until you're spoken to"; "Children should beseen and not heard". As a result
m
any people hold back fro
m
co
mm
unicating their thoughts and feelings to others.They feel vulnerable. While so
m
e caution
m
ay be wise in certain relationships,excessive fear of what others
m
ight think of us can stunt our develop
m
ent aseffective co
mm
unicators and our ability to for 
m
 
m
eaningful relationships.
4. Cultural barriers
When we join a group and wish to re
m
ain in it, sooner or later we need to adopt the behaviour patterns of the group. These are the behaviours that the group accept assigns of belonging.The group rewards such behaviour through acts of recognition, approval andinclusion. In groups which are happy to accept you, and where you are happy toconfor 
m
, there is a
m
utuality of interest and a high level of win-win contact.Where, however, there are barriers to your 
m
e
m
 bership of a group, a high level of ga
m
e-playing replaces good co
mm
unication.
5. Language barriers
Language that describes what we want to say in our ter 
m
s
m
ay present barriers toothers who are not fa
m
iliar with our expressions, buzz-words and jargon. When wecouch our co
mm
unication in such language, it is a way of excluding others. In aglobal
m
arket place the greatest co
m
 pli
m
ent we can pay another person is to talk intheir language.One of the
m
ore chilling
m
e
m
ories of the Cold War was the threat by the Sovietleader Nikita Khruschev saying to the A
m
ericans at the United Nations: "We will bury you!" This was taken to
m
ean a threat of nuclear annihilation.

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