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Developing a Community Ownership DR Culture to Create Sustainability Within the Education Infrastructure. 1st Dujiangyan International Forum2010. - Garry de la Pomerai

Developing a Community Ownership DR Culture to Create Sustainability Within the Education Infrastructure. 1st Dujiangyan International Forum2010. - Garry de la Pomerai

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Published by Garry De La Pomerai
Key Note speech on Developing a Community Ownership DR Culture to Create Sustainability Within the Education Infrastructure. at the 1st Dujiangyan International Forum2010
Key Note speech on Developing a Community Ownership DR Culture to Create Sustainability Within the Education Infrastructure. at the 1st Dujiangyan International Forum2010

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Published by: Garry De La Pomerai on Feb 23, 2011
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03/04/2011

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The 1st Dujiangyan International Forum"Developing a Community OwnershipDR Culture to create Sustainability within the Education Infrastructure" 
 
 1 |P a g e  
 
"Developing a Community Ownership DR Culture to create Sustainability within the Education Infrastructure" 
 
 
Perception of your vulnerability is a good starting point if we are to develop community ownershipof a substantive Disaster Reduction Culture.As I review recent mega disasters such as the great 2004 tsunamis, the enormous bush fires more recently in Australia and California, the cyclone across Myanmar in2008 
Example of cyclone damage
and of course the very destructive earthquakes in Bam Iran 2003, Pakistan 2005 , Indonesia 2006 
Example Pedang Indonesia 2009
here in Sichuan 2008 and this year in Haiti 2010,
 
The 1st Dujiangyan International Forum"Developing a Community OwnershipDR Culture to create Sustainability within the Education Infrastructure" 
 
 2 |P a g e   
Haiti 2010
I notice that all of these seemed to catch us by surprise. Australians and Americans have had bushfires before and yet lives were lost. Tsunamis are not new, in fact the small Island of Simeulue, off Indonesia during the 2004 Tsunamis had its infrastructure destroyed but yet only seven of theisland's 70,000 people died. Chile recently experienced a 8.8 earthquake but lost less than 600people, but Haiti lost 230,000 with a magnitude 7.0 earthquake. The Caribbean experiences up toten hurricanes annually with few lives lost but Myanmar lost 4000 with one cyclone in 2008 and10,000 were lost during another cyclone in South Asia in 1999.So we must ask ourselves why do some communities survive well and others not. Why is it thatsome are resilient, prepared and able to recover relatively quickly but others take years, in fact somefail to ever fully recover.I turn to our understanding of the perception of risk 
Shimla India
, realising our vulnerability to the numerous potential hazards, which might affect a global region, anindividual mainland country or Island, a region within a country, a single community or simply oneschool within a community and to demonstrate this I sight the UKs Aberfan disaster
(appendix 5)
 within Wales in 1966 
Aberfan Wales UK 1966
 
The 1st Dujiangyan International Forum"Developing a Community OwnershipDR Culture to create Sustainability within the Education Infrastructure" 
 
 3 |P a g e  when a coal slag heap slipped killing 144 people, of which 116 were children within one school andthe more recent school collapse in Haiti in November 2008 
Haiti School collapse 2008
when an unauthorised building used as a school collapsed beneath them, killing 88.To understand the potential risks, we must make ourselves aware of the differing types of hazardslikely to affect us. Often these are passed down between generations within the collectiveindigenous knowledge; during more recent decades this knowledge is reinforced by formal disasterreduction education within schools and communities introduced by specialist advocators, constantlyencouraging the inclusion of DR within Education for all. We have a few key globetrotters with ustoday, including Marla Patal and Khizer Omer. Authorities also have a moral responsibility to ensurepublic buildings, schools and hospitals are built within Building Codes, to recognised high standardsof safety and resilience with Schools being licensed and monitored, with all alterations, additionsand developments being professionally assessed by qualified engineers. 
Engineer inspection
So, the first formal step is assessment; assessing what we know and understand; assessing the risks;assessing our preparedness, our potential resilience and assessing our management resources tomake change.However this can not be done purely by a single teacher or indeed purely by our Mayor, it has to bethrough the combined, managed and informed efforts of the whole community,
Community meetings
 

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