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Law to govern reproductive rights and surrogacy in India.

Law to govern reproductive rights and surrogacy in India.

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Published by 24x7emarketing
Rotunda-The Center for Human Reproduction is Ivf Clinic and fertility clinic in Mumbai,India,Asia.We are state-of-the-art IVF laboratory which is Mumbai's first ISO 9001-2000 facility. We are Infertility, Fertility & IVF ,Surrogacy Clinic for Male & Female in Mumbai,India. Our fertility centre provides the best affordable quality infertility,fertility treatments with advanced reproductive technologies like IVF,ART, GIFT, ZIFT, TET, ICSI,donor egg,surrogate and surrogacy services for all nationalities,All couples including lesbian and gay couples and even single men and single women can avail this facility to fulfill their dream of enjoying parenthood.

Rotunda-The Center for Human Reproduction
http://www.iwannagetpregnant.com
iwannagetpregnant9@gmail.com
+91 22 2655 2000
Rotunda-The Center for Human Reproduction is Ivf Clinic and fertility clinic in Mumbai,India,Asia.We are state-of-the-art IVF laboratory which is Mumbai's first ISO 9001-2000 facility. We are Infertility, Fertility & IVF ,Surrogacy Clinic for Male & Female in Mumbai,India. Our fertility centre provides the best affordable quality infertility,fertility treatments with advanced reproductive technologies like IVF,ART, GIFT, ZIFT, TET, ICSI,donor egg,surrogate and surrogacy services for all nationalities,All couples including lesbian and gay couples and even single men and single women can avail this facility to fulfill their dream of enjoying parenthood.

Rotunda-The Center for Human Reproduction
http://www.iwannagetpregnant.com
iwannagetpregnant9@gmail.com
+91 22 2655 2000

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Published by: 24x7emarketing on Feb 24, 2011
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01/16/2015

 
India's surrogacy industry under scrutiny
India hopes a new law will help regulate the country's surrogacy services and stop people beingexploited by 'rent-a-womb' medical tourism.Over the past decade, India has become a popular medical tourism destination and experts sayhundreds of surrogate births took place there last year.But there will soon be a law to govern reproductive rights and surrogacy in India.
IVF Treatment | IVF Surrogacy Centre | Infertility Treatment INDIA 
COMMERCIAL surrogacy in India
, dubbed as the “surrogacy capital of the world”, is projected tobecome a whopping US$2.3bil (RM7bil) industry by 2012, according to the Confederation of IndianIndustry.However, despite the gargantuan size of the enterprise, surrogacy-related fertility tourism has long beenfraught with ethical and human rights concerns in the country. Although the Indian Supreme Courtlegalised commercial surrogacy in India in 2002, there are still no clear laws governing such transactionsin the country.What passes off as “law” is a skeletal, 126-page document issued by the Indian Council of MedicalResearch (ICMR) in 2005, which lays down the National Guidelines for Accreditation, Supervision andRegulation of Assisted Reproductive Technologies Clinics in India.However, experts point out that these guidelines are legally non-binding, as they have not yet beenratified by the Indian Parliament. Besides, the current rules are ambiguous about vital issues like therights of the surrogate, their minimum age, details about the contracts, informed consent and adoptionrequirements. This opacity often leads to legal ambivalence for would-be parents or exploitation of poorIndian women who rent out their wombs to earn money.
 
Driving the demand for Indian surrogates amongst infertile couples in industrialised nations, are thecountry’s unique advantages as a low-cost surrogacy destination, its lax laws, mushrooming AssistedReproductive Techniques (ART) clinics and the easy availability of surrogate mothers.The Bill has incorporated several landmark stipulations. For instance, no surrogate mother shall undergoembryo transfer more than three times for the same couple. If a surrogate mother is married, theconsent of her spouse is mandatory. Only Indian citizens can be considered for surrogacy. No ART bankor clinic can send an Indian citizen for surrogacy abroad. Strict confidentiality has to be maintainedabout the donor's identity. Dr Gautam Allahbadia, medical director, The Rotunda Centre for Human Reproduction in Mumbai, hastold the bill regulates the industry, but also makes it easier for legitimate surrogacy arrangements.
IVF treatment specialist
"Surrogacy will be easiest to do in India," he said.
"Once it becomes law, there will be absolutely no legal tangles. A couple can take their baby away with abirth certificate that will carry the genetic parents' names, so all these rules, guidelines once theybecome a law, means that everything will become very easy."
 
Most Indian IVF clinics also have a strong Internet presence which helps them attract overseas patientswho have to grapple with long waiting periods for such treatments, especially in the West.Apart from a sizeable spurt in the demand for Indian surrogate babies from overseas wannabe parents,there’s plenty of domestic demand as well as India is home to 14% of the world’s estimated 80 millioninfertile couples.
IVF surrogacy India: the business of making babies,
 
India to regulate 'rent-a-womb' surrogacy trade
According to estimates, Indian clinics charge patients between US$10,000 and US$28,000 (RM30,400and RM85,120) for the complete package including fertilisation, the surrogate’s fee and delivery of the
 
baby at a hospital, airfare, medical procedures and hotels. This all-encompassing arrangement still worksout to a third of the price a parent would have to cough up in the West.However, the trade in India also breeds unscrupulous middlemen who entice and push marginalisedwomen into surrogate motherhood. There’s no protection against the misuse of a surrogate child forpurposes of terrorism, prostitution or unethical genetic engineering research.Fortunately, all this may soon change. The Indian Parliament has recently cleared the AssistedReproductive Technologies Regulation Bill 2010, which contains several landmark proposals tostreamline surrogacy practices in the country. The Bill, which will become a law as soon as it gets theLaw Ministry’s nod, proposes path-breaking changes in the way surrogacy transactions are conducted inIndia.For one, the Bill proposes that a candidate for a surrogate arrangement should not be less than 21 ormore than 35 years of age. This is a welcome step as earlier, many teenaged women or those above 40were offering their services for surrogacy purposes for monetary reasons.The Bill also suggests that no Indian surrogate be permitted to give more than five live births, includingher own children. If implemented properly, this provision will hopefully check the common malpracticeamongst Indian surrogates that compromises the health of both the mother and newborn.The proposed legislation also states that “no surrogate mother shall undergo embryo transfers for morethan three times for the same couple”. Also, if a surrogate mother is married, the consent of her spousewill be mandatory. The Bill stresses that only Indian citizens ought to be considered for surrogacy. Norcan any ART bank or clinic send an Indian citizen for surrogacy abroad. Over and above, clinics will haveto keep the donors’ identity strictly confidential.Another important provision in the Bill is that the surrogate mother will not “harm the foetus duringpregnancy or after birth”. As parents, the baby’s birth certificate will bear the names of the individualswho had commissioned the surrogacy and these commissioning parents will have to accept the child’scustody irrespective of any congenital abnormality.The newly proposed regulations have gladdened many hearts.According to the ICMR guidelines, a child born through surrogacy “must be adopted by the genetic(biological) parents unless they can establish through genetic (DNA) fingerprinting that the child istheirs.”This means the only option left open to them is to “adopt” the baby – which is a cumbersome process inIndia.

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Rotunda offers Gestational Surrogacy in India to people of all nationalities. http://www.iwannagetpregnant.com/surr...

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