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20110225-Public Hearings on Shale Gas - Parliament UK Written Submissions

20110225-Public Hearings on Shale Gas - Parliament UK Written Submissions

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Published by Schaliegas
Written submissions for the public hearings on shale gas in the UK parliament. Submissions by Shell, Cuadrilla Resources, etc.
Written submissions for the public hearings on shale gas in the UK parliament. Submissions by Shell, Cuadrilla Resources, etc.

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Published by: Schaliegas on Feb 25, 2011
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08/12/2014

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Energy
 
and
 
Climate
 
Change
 
Committee
 
Shale
 
Gas
 
 
Ref 
 
Organisation
 
Page
SG
 
01
 
Department
 
of 
 
Energy
 
and
 
Climate
 
Change
 
2
 
SG
 
02
 
World
 
Coal
 
Association
 
13
 
SG
 
03
 
British
 
Geological
 
survey
 
22
 
SG
 
04
 
The
 
Old
 
Rectory
 
25
 
SG
 
05
 
Professor
 
Richard
 
Selley
 
29
 
SG
 
06
 
National
 
Grid
 
32
 
SG
 
07
 
IGas
 
Energy
 
33
 
SG
 
08
 
Cuadrilla
 
Resouces
 
Holdings
 
Ltd
 
38
 
SG
 
09
 
Campaign
 
to
 
Protect
 
Rural
 
England
 
51
 
SG
 
10
 
Scottish
 
&
 
Southern
 
Energy
 
53
 
SG
 
11
 
Scotia
 
Gas
 
Networks
 
55
 
SG
 
12
 
Tyndall
 
Centre
 
for
 
Climate
 
Change
 
58
 
SG
 
13
 
Ofgem
 
69
 
SG
 
14
 
Shell
 
International
 
Ltd
 
76
 
SG
 
15
 
The
 
Geological
 
Society
 
84
 
SG
 
16
 
Prof 
 
Stevens
Chatham
 
House
 
91
 
SG
 
17
 
CNG
 
Services
 
Ltd
 
98
 
SG
 
18
 
The
 
Co
operative
 
Group
 
105
 
SG
 
19
 
Philip
 
Mitchell
 
114
 
SG
 
20
 
No
 
Hot
 
Air
 
118
 
SG
 
21
 
Friends
 
of 
 
the
 
Earth
 
124
 
SG
 
22
 
WWF
UK
 
127
 
 
 
  Memorandum submitted by the Department of Energy and Climate Change(SG 1) Introduction UK Onshore Oil & Gas Activity in General 
1.  The onshore oil and gas industry has been operating in the UK for well over 60years and production, although currently only 1.5% of overall UK oil & gas total,nevertheless contributes usefully to UK security of supply and to the UK economy. 2.  Close cooperation between the industry and the planning authorities has allowedthe industry to develop with minimal environmental impact.  Alongside DECC licencesand consents, all exploration and development activities also need to be authorised bythe Health & Safety Executive . 3.  Recent years have seen continued interest in onshore oil and gas activity as theresponse to the 13th Round in 2008 proved.  That Round saw a good outcome with 97licences awarded in total confirming the continuing commercial attractiveness of onshore oil and gas exploration opportunities in the UK, and there was renewedinterest in coal bed methane. 4.  Current estimates suggest that overall onshore potential proven and probablereserves equate to around 1.5% - 2% of the UK's overall reserves.  Governmentwants to ensure that operators get the opportunity to explore and develop onshore -and licensing is the first part of this process. 5.  There are currently some 28 UK onshore oil fields and 10 onshore gas fields inproduction.  Overall UK onshore oilproduction is around 24,000 barrels per day(2009).  BP's Wytch Farm field (Dorset) is the largest onshore oil field in Europe, and,although production peaked over a decade ago, the field still produces around 20,000barrels a day (around 83% of UK onshore oil production). 
 UNCONVENTIONAL GAS
 6.  In the UK, as elsewhere, gas (and oil) is predominantly produced from permeablerock formations such as sandstones.   But there have been many attempts over theyears to develop other kinds of petroleum resources.   The commercial developmentof “unconventional” gas resources has been limited until the last decade, when newproduction techniques have enabled a rapid development of shale gas. 7.  Natural gas can also be extracted from coal deposits by drilling (“coal bedmethane” or CBM – also known as “coal seam gas”).   The energy of coal can also beexploited by gasifying the coal in the ground (“underground coal gasification” or UCG),though the gas produced is not “natural gas” (i.e., predominantly methane), but amixture of combustible gases.   
 1
 
 
Conventional versus unconventional shale gas, tight gas and coal bed methane (CBM)
   UK Potential & Licence Rounds 
8.  Although there may be significant resources of unconventional gas in the UK, thishas not so far been demonstrated.  It should not be assumed that the commercialsuccess of shale gas and CBM in the US will be transferable to the different geologicaland other conditions of the UK.  We are however encouraging exploration andappraisal actively for both shale gas and coal bed methane.  The Coal Authority issimilarly encouraging exploration and appraisal for underground coal gasificationactively. 9.  DECC aims to launch a new (14
th
) onshore round this year, and expects a fairamount of interest from the industry, for both conventional and unconventionalprospects. 10.  The map below shows the location of CBM wells drilled, the three approved CBMdevelopments, the Underground Coal Gasification licences awarded by the CoalAuthority, the current onshore licences and the area under consultation which may beoffered in the 14
th
licence round.    
 2

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