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HIS 500 Lesson One

HIS 500 Lesson One

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04/30/2011

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Fenwick
Lesson
One
Page
| 1
Lesson
Plan
#1 in
Unit:
Establishing Context
and
Visual Literacy
AP/Honors
U.S. History,
11
th
Grade
Unit:
Forming a Nation
Topic:
Establishing
a
Republic: Silencing Rebellion
and
Shaping American Political Culture
ISBE
Standards Addressed
16.A.5a
Analyze
historical
and
contemporary developments using methods
of
historical inquiry
(pose
questions, collect
and
analyze
data, make
and
support inferences
with
evidence,
report
findings).
16.B.4
(US)
Identify political
ideas
that
have dominated United States historical
eras
(e.g., Federalist,
Jacksonian,
Progressivist,
New
Deal,
New
Conservative).
Enduring
Understanding/Rationale
Not too
long after
the end of the
Revolutionary War,
the
nation experienced economic
turmoil,
civil unrest,
and
fierce political disagreements. This lesson
establishes
context
for a
week-long study
of the
period
in
which Americans were struggling
to
agree upon
the
nature
and
structure
of
their
new, independentgovernment.
By
watching three video segments
from
An
Empire
of
Reason
about
Shays's
Rebellion
and theFederalist/Antifederalist
debate, students
will
begin
to
understand
that
the
nation could hardly
be
called
the
"United"
States
of
America during this
time.
Objectives:
SWBATo...
Identify
and
explain,
in
writing,
key
points
of
three video segments
from
"An
Empire
of
Reason"
by
completing
a
viewing guide handout.
Using evidence, describe,
in writing, the
fragility
of the
nation during
the
period shortly after
the
Revolutionary
War.
Using evidence,
support, in
writing,
either
the
Federalist
or
Antifederalist positions
set
forth
in the
video
segments.
Materials:
PC,
Projector, Handout
24
Students;
45
minute
session
ProcedureEstablishing
Context: connections
to the
present
and
discussion
of
enduring themes
and
"big"
and
"essential" questions
(10 min)
1)
Anticipatory
Set
• The
following
three
"big"
historical
questions
are
projected:
o
What
is the
proper role
of a
federal government?
To
what extent should
it be
responsible
for
the
welfare
of its
people?
 
F
e n w i c k
Lesson
One
Page
|2
oShould therebemoreor
less
governmentin theeconomy?oUnder
what
circumstancesisprotestorrebellion againstthegovernmentor
other
authorities
acceptable?
Students
are
instructed
to
choose one,
write
down
an
answer,
and be
prepared
to
explain
the
answer.
Teacher takes attendance
and
monitors students' progress
2)
Debrief the Anticipatory Set
Teacher solicits
at
least
one
response
for
each
prompt
If one
question
is not
selected, teachers
poses
it and
waits
for
response(s)
Teacher
explains
that
we
will
explore these questions
in
depth this week
by
studying
the era
shortly
afterthe end of the
Revolutionary
War
until
a new republic is
founded
underthe
Constitution.
Westill
grapple
with
these
"big"questions
today.
Teacher present
the two
essential questions
for
this week
of
study:
o How
fragile
was the
nation
at its
inception?o How are the founders' political debates still played out today?
Teacher tells students
that
they
will be
able
to
answer these questions
in
depth
by the end of the
week.
Transition:
"Let's take
alookat amodern
interpretation
of the era we'regoingto
study...teacher
gives
students Viewing Guide Handout" [see
attachment].
Visual Literacy
Activity(30
min)
3)
Video
Clips
and
Discussion
• Cue
An
Empire
of
Reason
video
Play
Intro
(to
1:55)
Debrief/Discuss
o Identify
context
and
purpose
of the
film
Play
Shays's
Rebellion segment (1:55
to
5:55)
Debrief/DiscussoDescribetheAmerican economyatthis
time.
o Why is there fighting?o How does the commentator
John
Chancellor characterize the political climate of America?
What
message
is he
trying
to get
across?
o
What
is the
main
point
of
this segment?
Play
Federalist/Antifederalist
New
York
ratification debate segment
one
(9:42
to
16:45)
Debrief/Discuss
o
What
is the
main objection
to the
proposed Constitution
by Mr.
Yates
and Mr.
Lansing?
What
are
they accusing Hamilton
of
being? What
is
their
vision
of how
America
ought
to
be?
 
Fen
wick
Lesson
One
Page
| 3
o
What
is
Hamilton's position? What
is the
essential question
he
poses?
What
is his
vision
of
how
America
ought
to be?
Play
Federalist/Antifederalist
New
York
ratification debate segment
two
(30:28
to
37:50)
Debrief/Discuss
o
What
is
Melancton Smith's concern? What
is he
afraid
of?
What does
he
want?
o
What does Alexander Hamilton want?
Who
should
run
government? What
is his
complaint
about
the
Articles
of
Confederation?
How
does
he
describe
the
proposed federal government?
4)
Assign
Homework Formative Assessment-
Entry
Ticket
(5
min)
As a
homework assignment
and
entry ticket
to the
next
class,
students must respond
to two
questions:
o
Using evidence
from
what
you saw
today
on
Shays's
Rebellion, answer
the
essential question"How fragile
was the
nation
at its
inception?"
o
Right now, whose
arguments are
more
convincing
to
you,
Hamilton
(Federalist)
or
Yates,
Lansing,
and
Smith (Antifederalist)? Why?
Students
are
encouraged
to use
their
viewing guide
as a
resource
for
completing
the
entry
ticket.Source:
An
Empireof
Reason
(1998)
by the New
York
BarFoundation
http://www.courts.state.ny.us/historv/empire.asx

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